Symud i'r prif gynnwys
Cuddio Rhestr Erthyglau

18 erthygl ar y dudalen hon

THE AMERICAN SILVER BILL.

A COURT TORCH-LIGHT DANCE.

OUR MILITARi RESOURCES Itf-IWDIA*/

OFFICIAL CORRESPONDENCE.

.,"A FIGHT AT ODESSA.

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n ITHE LAW AFFECTING INSANE…

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, DEAN STANLEY ON THE POPES…

Newyddion
Dyfynnu
Rhannu

DEAN STANLEY ON THE POPES OF ROME. This Dean ef Westminster addressed a crowded congregation at the Union Chapel, Oomp ton-terrace, Mington, on The Popes of Rome." He was, how- ever, so indisposed daring the evening that he had to pause in the delivery of his lecture, and the con- cluding portion of it was read by the Rev. Dr. Allon. 'The dean said he did not desire to speak ef either the late or the future Pope, because the former had so recently passed away, and 88 to the latter there was still great uncertainty. Treating the Pope as an hia*»rical office, he said there were points connected therewith- which were of interest to every Christian Roman Catholicor Protestant, Churchman or Nonconformist. The Pope could be considered, first, as the representative of many customs of Christian antiquity.; secondly, as the representative of the ancient Roman Empire; thirdly, as an Italian prince and bishop; fourthly, as the Pope, or chief oracle of the Roman Church; and fifthly, as the head of the ecclesiastical profession of Western Europe. The Pope had had the character of an Italian prinee and bishop for many centuries, and was such a prince and bishop 88 the Bishop of Durham or the Mitred Abbot of West- minster had been. But whereas theseand similar prince- bishops had disappeared, the Pope remained. Since 1870 he had lost the dominion over a large portion of his territory. He was, still, however, the Sovereign Prince over the Vatican, ench as was the Prince of Monaeo, and had his guards and ambassadors. Refer- ring to the election of the Pope, the Dean said that in the earty days that election was in the hands of the populace, and in the fourth century it was con- ducted with such violence as to cause blood- shed. Si ace the twelfth century it had been conducted by the College of Cardinals. The title of Pope originally was not confined ex- clusively to the Bishop of Rome, but belonged to all the teachers. It was afterwards applied, to all bishops, and in the seventh century it dropped from the other Western bishops, remaining only with the Bishop of Rome. The claim of the Pope to infalli- bility was conceded by a large part of Christendom. He, however, became Pope simply by the election of the College of Cardinals, and he really need not be a clergyman to be elected by them. In fact, on two occasions laymen had been elected Popes, and those who imagined that the Pope inherited his office by virtue of episcopal succession laboured under a great mistake.

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A ROMANCE m JteEAh LIFE.

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A COSTLY SOLDIER.

HUSBAND AND WIFE.

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ENGLAND'S FIELD ARMY..

A PLEA FOR "BREACH OF PROMISE."

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