Symud i'r prif gynnwys
Cuddio Rhestr Erthyglau

21 erthygl ar y dudalen hon

IHK FLEET RUNNING THE GAUNTLET…

[No title]

THE VICTORIA CROSB AND ALBERT…

THE TOWNELEY FAMILY.

[No title]

COLLIERY DISASTER IN SCOTLAND.

THE VALUE OF THE CLEOPATRA.

[No title]

THE CAT TAX.

BOAT RACE ON THE TYNE.

[No title]

SCENE AT THE SIGNATURE OF…

[No title]

EXTRAORDINARY DIYORCE CASE.

THE VOLUNTEERS AND THE NEW…

A PRESTON WILL CASE.

[No title]

THE^QUEEN AT THE ROYAL TAPESTRY…

REMARKABLE BREACH OF PROMISE…

CHARGING AT FOOTBALL.

Newyddion
Dyfynnu
Rhannu

CHARGING AT FOOTBALL. A PLAYER COMMITTED FOR TBIAL. Mr. Deane held an inquiry at Aahby de-Ia-Zouch, Leicestershire, as to the death ot Herbert Dockerty, a young man who received fatal injuries while play- ing at football. Mr. George Dean Orchard, captain of the Ashby F.O., stated that Dockerty was one of the players in a football match at Ashby on the 27th ult., played under "Association "rules. In the course of the game a man named Bradshaw charged Dockerty, who was "dribbling" the ball. The witness stated that Bradshaw put his knee up, and jumped towards Dockerty with his hands clenched close in front of him. Dockerty was knocked down by the charge and Bradshaw went down also. Bradshaw charged Dockerty in a way totally different from the usual manner of play. The witness added that Bradshaw could, at all events, have avoided ccming into col- lision with Dockerty notwithstanding that ho was running very hard. The witness did not think the charge was fair and legitimate football. Mr. N.J. H. Hallett, solicitor, who took part in the game, stated that Dockerty was following the ball up when Bradshaw met him. Dockerty kicked the ball on one side past Bradshaw, who, however, still charged Dockerty, and jumped at him with his knee protruding very much. He was completely off the ground when he met Dockerty, and his knee ap- peared to catch him in the stomach. From what the witness saw, the charge was a most unfair one; in fact, he had never seen a more unfair charge although he had played football for the last fifteen years. Such a charge must of necessity be exceedingly dan- gerous, and was certainly intentional. Selina Dock- erty, sister of the deceased, said he died on the 28th ult., his last words being, "Forgive Bradshaw, all of you, as I forgive him. He has done you ft great wrong." Dr. Betts said he had made a post-mortem examination and found that death was caused by rupture of the intestines. Dr. Oots corroborated this evidence. Mr. Fowler, of Lei" cester, contended that the occurrence was accidental, and pointed out that there was an entire absence of malice or motive for injuring Dockerty. The jury returned a verdict That the deceased died from daØ undue violence used by Bradshaw," which the coroner held to be a verdict of manslaughter. The jury eX" Eressed the opinion that the game of football ought t* a erased from the pastimes of England. BradshaW was committed for trial by the coroner. He ws* immediately afterwards arrested by the police and brought before Mr. Leith, who remanded him on charge of causing Dockerty's death. He was ad- mitted to bail.

[No title]