Symud i'r prif gynnwys
Cuddio Rhestr Erthyglau

21 erthygl ar y dudalen hon

.-THE TERCENTENARY OF HARVEY.

Newyddion
Dyfynnu
Rhannu

THE TERCENTENARY OF HARVEY. "Williara Harvey, the illustrious discoverer of the circulation of the blood, was born at Folkestone on the E 1st of April, 1578, and an endeavour is being made to celebrate the tercentenary of his birth by the erection of a statue to his memory in his native town. Harvey I was a great benefactor to the College of Physicians, and an oration in his honour is annually delivered in the college; but this is primarily in memory of his gifts to the institution rather than of his labours in the causa of suffering humanity or of his great dis- covery, by which he laid the foundations of the whole of the modern sciences of physiology and medicine. The Memorial Committee, of which the Earl ef Deroy 18 chairman, has now been at work forsomeyears, having been appointed at a public meeting which was held at Folkestone in September, 1871. On that occasion Mr. John Simon, O.B., then chief medical officer to the Privy Council, was present, and seconded one of the resolutions. In doing so, he said it was almost needh-ss, before an educated audience, to speak in detail of Harvey's discovery or to insist on its high importance to the human race. To medical practice it stands much in the same relation as the discovery of the mariner's compass to navigation; without it, the medical practitioner would be all adrift, and his efforts to benefit mankind would be made in ignorance and at random. Any one c".n imagine what the practice of medicine, and es- pecially of surgery, must have been before Harvey's discovery, when men's conception of the working of the different parts of the human frame in relation to one another was littlo clearer than the child's physiology of the sawdust in its doll's body. Harvey, in teaching the fact of the circulation of the blood, in teaching what duty is done by each beat of the heart, in relation on the one hand to tho function of respi- ration, and on the other hand to the nourishment of all the textures of the body, gave us our first ground- wark of animal physiology. It is no exaggeration to say that in giving to the world that first precise knowledge of the circulation of the blood he laid the indispensable foundations for all physiology that has followed or can follow; and surely this achievement by our countryman is something for us all to honour and be proud of.

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ERUPTION OF MOUNT HECLA.

A REMARKABLE CASE.

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THE AUSTRIAN ARMY.

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RUSSIAN VIEWS OF WAR WITHj…

THE CALLING OUT OF THE RESERVES.

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HOW THE GREEh. INSURRECTION…

5 BREACH OF PROMISE CASES.

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THE MILITARY SITUATION IN…

THE CHANGES IN THE CABINET.

TURKISH REFUGEES.

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THE BURNING OF THE SPHINX.

DEPUTATIONS TO LORD GRANVILLE…

ON BOARD HOBART PASHA'S FLAG-…

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