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UP TO DATE.

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UP TO DATE. 1 BY PETER.] The statistics of the last census have just come to hand, and it is interesting to know that in the Southern Division of Glamorganshire the popula- tion has increased to 75,772, the figures in 1881 being 4S,10S. -0- In my notes last week I dealt with the question of the appointment of county magistrates, and the evils attendantupon the present system. I now find that a Bill has been introduced by Mr. Morton, Sir C. Dilke, Mr. Lloyd-Morgan, and others, the object of which is to do away with the property qualifications of county magistrates in England and Wales, to give all classes an opportunity of being represented on the county benches, and to put England and Wales on an equality with Ireland and Scotland with respect to the qualifica- tion of county magistrates. There is no statutory property qualification for either county or borough magistrates in Ireland ard Scotland, nor in England and Wales tor borough magistrates. I certainly think that all classes should be placed upon an equal footing, and that every man who by his actions or public service has entitled him- self to a seat on the magisterial bench should have a chance of reaching that position of honour. -0- One bit'of good work has been done this session by the Liberal Party, who have passed the Bill to remove the disabilities of the police, which has been introduced by Mr. C. E. Schwann, M.P., for North Manchester. This Bill-or Act as I may term it—enables the police to exercise the franchise in Municipal, School Board, and other local election in cases in which they possess the qualifi- cations which are necessary to enable any other citizens to vote. It is a matter of gratification that a highly respectable and deserving body of public servants are admitted to the full rights attaching to British citizenship. Ic is, too, in accordance with the fitness of things that this right should have been secured to the police by the Liberal Party. Under the Bill police men are prohibited from formal canvassing, a restriction for the possession of which they are to be envied. There was at first some opposition to Mr. Schwann's efforts after enfranchisement for the police, but when it appeared that alike in England, Scotland, and Wales they were earnestly desirous of posses- sing political right the opposition soon ceased. I congratulate the police on being admitted to the franchise, and felicitate the hon. member for North Manchester on the legislative success he has attained, notwithstanding the chamption obstruc- tionism which has prevailed in the House of Commons. I am pleased to record the fact that there is now every probability of the Charter for the Welsh University being granted during the course of the present session. The Welsh University Conference have held a meeting in London under the presi- dency of Lord Aberdare, and afterwards met the members of Parliament for Wales and Monmouth- shire at the House of Commons to consider the Charter which had been adopted by the Confer- ence and approved by the three University Colleges and the County Councils of Wales and Monmouth- shire. Mr. Stuart Rendel was in the chair. Several Welsh members of Parliament were present and representatives of the Welsh University Colleges. The discussion resulted in cordial agreement, and it was confidently believed that the Charter will be granted in the course of the present session. -0- In these days of legislation for the working classes one is not surprised to find any Department of the Government displaying some anxiety as to the whereabouts of children after they leave school. With the object of obtaining some" infor- mation as to what has become of the larg%number of scholars who annually leave school thgsEdlwa- tion Department has addressed the following circular to School Boards and School Managers :— With a view to obtaining more specific infor- mation than is at present available on the sub- ject of the employment of children, my Lords desire to obtain a census, complete as far as possible, of the employments to which children, both boys and girls, from public elementary schools go immediately on leaving school. In the admission registers there is usually a column for remarks,' and my Lords would suggest that the teachers, who will doubtless fully appreciate the importance of the inquiry, might be instructed to enter in this column, in the case of each child who left the school, the nature of the employment (if any) into which the child was immediately about to enter. It is desired that the return should be for one year from the 1st June next, and my Lords request that at the end of that period you will be so good as to forward to this department the information asked for. A specimen is enclosed showing how the forms should be completed. A further supply of focms will be sent if desired. The specimen indicates the kind of entries which should be made in the admission register. -0- That the Star has many volunteers among its readers I have not the least doubt, and it may be interesting to Know that Thursday last completed the thirty-fourth year of the existence of the Volunteer Force the circular of General Lee, then Secretary for War, authorising the enrolment of corps of riflemen, each not exceeding in strength a hundred officers and men, having been issued on the 12th of May, 1859. The authority for these companies to amalgamate as battalions was not given till some months later. Whilst dealing with the Volunteer Forces I might mention the fact that great anxiety is being expressed in many quarters at the exceedingly large number of commissions now vacant in the Volunteer force of the country. In many regiments not more than half the subalterns' posts are filled, whilst in others the deficiency is still greater. It is computed that not less than fifteen hundred commissions are vacant, and it is felt that the time has arrived when steps should be taken to remedy what is regarded as a serious state of things. By some it is argued that greater induce- ments should bo given to young gentlemen to join; by others it is suggested that in case of Army officers who retire from the service for their own convenience, one of the provisions should be their willingness to accept a commission in the Vol un- teer force. -0- An important resolution has been taken by the Government with respect to the extension of electric light. It is resolved to appoint a joint Committee of Lords and Commons to consider and report whether the granting of statutory powers to use electricity ought to be qualified by any prohibition or restriction as to earth return circuits, or by provisions as to leakage induction or similar matters. If the Joint Committee are of opinion that any such provision be necessary, clauses will be drafted for their enforcement. -0- The forty-second annual report of the Amalga- mated Society of Engineers informs us that the society has now 522 branches with a membership of 70.909, and an income of nearly a quarter of a. million. This sum was not sufficient for the needs 0' of the year by £ 23,000, which deducted from the reserve balance, leaves them with a balance of £ 214,344. —o— An M.P. has given notice that on going into Committee of Supply he should call attention to the report of the Royal Commission regarding electrical communication with lighthouses, and move a reduction of the vote. -0- Those who have had anything to do with the patenting of inventions know of the difficulties and delays which beset them. I find that Mr. Mundella received a deputation at the House of Commons from the Associated Chambers of Com- merce, who asked for a departmental committee to inquire into means of the speedier and more effectual registration of trade marks and designs. The deputation complained of delays and difficulties at the Patent Office, the method of payment, and uncertainty as to the use of words being allowed. Mr. Mundella said traders were too prone to go as near as possible to, instead of as far from, their neighbor's trade marks. He would have searching inquiries made. Sir Albert Rollit remarked that the answer was an eminently satisfactory one.

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