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--.-BARRY DOCK ROMAN CATHOLIC…

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BARRY DOCK ROMAN CATHOLIC SCHOOL. TTHE APPLICATION FOR OFFICIAL RECOGNITION. ALLEGED RELIGIOUS PERSECUTION BY THE SCHOOL BOARD. At the ordinary meeting of the Barry District Trades' and Labour Council, held on Friday evening last, at Barry Dock, Mr F. Walls (the flce-president) asked whether he would be allowed at the next meeting, when the School Board labour candidate (Mr John Rees) would be present, to put questions to Mr Rees with reference to the xecent action of the School Board in regard to the Application of the Romaa Catholic School to the Education Department for official recognition as a public elementary school. He (Mr Walls) felt very warmly on this subject. He was a strong tielieTer in religious freedom, and he felt that the treatment which the Catholic School had received At the hands of the School Board was couched in anything but a fair Christian spirit. Mr Walls was proceeding to state what would happen if a similar application had been made to the School Board by the Wesleyan body, when he was interrupted by the president, who remarked that if Mr Walls only intended giving notice he should not deliver a speech.—The Secretary (Mr W. P. Clark) con- sidered he was not in order. Besides, it was not fair to stab anyone in the dark.— Mr Walls denied any attempt whatever at stabbing in the dark. He had no desire to blame Mr Rees at all. All he wanted to do was to raise the matter by putting certain questions to Mr Rees. The day was past. lie believed, for religious freedom to be interfered with, and he felt the subject was one which should tJr dealt with by the council.—The President said Mr Walls was in order in giving notice of motion, and the matter could be raised at the next meeting in connection with the report of the labour member.—Mr Walls expressed satisfaction, and the matter then dropped. INTERVIEW WITH THE REV. MONSIGNOR WILLIAMS, CARDIFF. The Rev Monsignor Williams, of Cardiff, has fteen interviewed on the subject by a Pressman. The position of the question is briefly this Some years ago Monsignor Williams, seeing that Barry would delelop into a large place, procured land for the erection of a denominational school on a piece of ground which then stood in the middle of a farm, and which is now the centre of a popu- lous district. These schools were erected at a cost of £ 2,000, and opened in May, 1892, five months after the opening of the board school. Monsignor Williams then applied to the Education D part- atent to have the school recognised, so that they should receive the Governmental grant. This application, after reference from the Department to the Barry School Board, was refused..Vow, in view of the further necessary accommodation and the enlargement of the town, Monsignor Williams has renewed his application that the Roman datholic Schools be officially recognised. In reply to the reporter's enquiries. Monsignor Williams explained that the whole matter resolved itself into an objection to the voluntary system, and amounted to persecution. Our schools," Mons. Williams continued, were erected by ourselves, a certificated teacher was engaged, teaching was in strict accordance with the regulation code. and everything was free. Now each scholar in the Barry school costs the rates 18s and receives another 18s as Government grant. We don't ask for the 18s from the local rates, but we do ask for <he grant, because we provide for a necessity and for the children of our own people, and as they are part of the commonwealth, we consider they should benefit thereby like the board school. In any case each scholar in our schools, supposing we aaould receive the grant, would cost the rates 188 leas than the board school children." How has the matter arisen again ? In this wav. The district was increasing so rapidly that fresh accommodation will ilrnus^ immediately be required, and, this being so, I renewed my former application for the recognition of our schools." Then your previous application was refused, on the ground that there was already sufficient accommodation? Yes, it was but now this resolution of the board is certainly acknowledging that there is a lack of accommodation, and I have asked again that our schools be recognised. We are actually providing room for 200 children, for whom the board seeks to obtain accommodation. Under the circumstances, they cannot now assert that there is sufficient provision. Hence my application." I- What is the object in this continued objec. tion ?" -That they will not consent to our being acknowledged :i public elementary school, and a •i^aire to stamp out voluntary schools. Therefore, ,to means that they will put the public to the cost not only of providing the extra room, but of all the amount that will have to be paid out of the rates for their children, viz., 18s 4d each." By recognising your position this sum would be saved so far as it concerns the 240 children for whom you have room." Just so, but as I remarked they don't want ..Ienominational schools and they are determined to oppose them. and that is what we call persecu- tion." In answer to further queries, Mons. Williams explained. The position in this country is a dual one. viz., denominational and board, and the law allows -each parent the choice of a school. In Cardiff the feoard schools and denominational schools work .Mide by side, and. indeed, in all large towns the denominational schools receive the grant. The fact of our not getting the grant, I say again, aaakes us term it persecution. The Cardiff Board has never opposed the recognition of denomina- tional schools. Why. in Cardiff, we are educating 3,t>00 children, for whom we receive Government grants." The matter is not settled yet ? No yeu see the Barry School Board will send their reply to the Education Department who will, in their turn. forward me their decision, whatever 4hat may be. upon the matter." INTERVIEW WITH DR. LLOYD-EDWARDS. BARRY DOCK. Interviewed on the question, Dr W. Lloyd Adwardg, the seconder of the board's resolution, stated that the opposition of the board was not .-ne prompted out of a desire to interfere with the Roman Catholic School as a Roman Catholic insti- gation. The religious question did not tnter into the matter at all in the giving of his vote; and he and his fellow Nonconformists would vote against ithe establishment of any denominational school in the district which sought to obtain State aid. He regretted that Dr O'Donnell and Monsignor Williams had raised that point, and could Only -explain it by saying that they were following the practice of introducing asides which were likely to influence public opinion owing to the weakness of 4heir arguments. At the last school board election there were thirteen candidates, and of these ten were pledged against voluntary schools of any descrip- tion,S&nd one—a Church of England gentleman— liad declared himself against a State-aided Roman Catholic school in the district. The remaining 4bwo were in favour of voluntary schools, and one of them, who was very popular in the district, was defeated. The votes cast at the election showed 4hat the ratepayers were overwhelmingly against the establishment of denominational schools. Under these circumstances, he claimed that his colleagues were bound to take the action they did, ,and he would resign his position rather than vote contrary to his conscience. In this case the electors had decided that there should be no schools obtaining State aid, unless they were .der proper control. The Roman Catholic school would be privately managed—it did not matter to him by whom-and he could not be a Radical and vote for taxation without representa- tion. Mons. Williams had stated in effect that the Barry Board was not so liberal as the Cardiff School Board. That, too, did not matter to him. The Barry Board did what they were pledged to As, and what they would do if they were not so pledged. It would be inconsistent for Noncon- formists seeking for the Disestablishment of a State-aided Church to abstain from opposing the grants of State, and to a school which would be used in the propagation of dogmatic teachings. But all this, added Dr Edwards, was simply in reply to the asides of those who differed from the majority of the board. The chairman (Mr J. Lowdon, J.P.) had shown that there was sufficient accommodation for the present needs of the district in the board schools, and that, therefore, the Roman Catholic school was not a necessary school. The board, ton, had taken steps for the growth of the district in view of the new dock works. It was not a question of sentiment, he concluded, but of fact and principle, and he was positive the action of his colleagues would be upheld by the great bulk of the electors.

THE PROPOSED INCURSION OF…

BARRY DISTRICT TRADES' AND…

THE STRANDING OF THE VANDUARA…

A BARRY SAILOR CHARGED WITH…

BARRY HARBOUR AND THE BOARD…

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BARRY TRAINS TO CARDIFF DOCKS.

QUARTERLY MEETING OF DISTRICT…

A BARRY SAILOR MISSING.

APPOINTMENT OF OVERSEERS FOR…

THE SMALL POX CASES AT BARRY…

BARRY BOUND VESSEL IN COLLISION.

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