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i DEATH OF MR HAYDN ! PARRY.|

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DEATH OF MR HAYDN PARRY. A BRILLIANT WELSHMAN SUD- DENLY PASSES AWAY. HIS FATHER IS DR PARRY, OF PENARTH. It is with profound regret that we have this week to chronicle the death of Mr Haydn Parry. The sad event took place at 2.30 on Thursday morning at his residence, 87, Broadhurst-gardens, Finchley-road, N.W., after a comparatively brief and sudden illness. On Friday last the young musician returned home from a friend's house complaining of chill, which he thought he had caught on the way home. No serions effects were anticipated, but the next morning, after a restless night, he was seized with severe shivering attacks, and in consequence Dr Waite was sent for. He gave it as his opinion that his patient was suffering from a recurrence of an old complaint-American ague-which Mr Parry caught in 1884 in the States and pre- scribed accordingly. The invalid would have liked to have gone downstairs, but his wife and mother (Mrs Joseph Parry), who had come up from Penarth to spend the Easter, prevailed upon him to keep to his room. Mr Parry, however, got up, but did not leave his apartment. During the day he was seized with a nasty cough, and on Sunday it would seem that pleurisy and pneumonia were complicating the original attack. On Monday about five o'clock poor Parry's cough became so dis- tressing, almost shaking him to pieces, that it was deemed advisable to call in Dr Hardwicke. But, though considering their patient's cundition somewhat serious, no danger was apprehended. On Tuesday, how- ever, Mr Parry began to be delirious, and it was at once recognised that his condition was critical. Dr Hardwicke, in fact, paid six visits that day, so alarmed had he become. At this time Mrs Hydn Parry was assisted not only by her husband's mother, but also by Mr and Mrs Mendelssohn Parry, and every care and attention that man could have was given. On Wednesday, as the delirium appeared to increase, Dr Sir Frederick Roberts was called in. After examination and consultation with his colleagues, he could offer the anxious relations but little hope. The sufferer, he ieared, had not the strength to cope with such a complication of diseases as had seized hold of him. But effort was Dot relaxed, and physicians with coats off fairly fought with death all the day and into the greater part of the night. Poor Parry, though at times recognising those around him, was in the throes of delirium. In one of his calm moments he kissed his sorrowing wife and children and spoke cheerfully to the other members of the family, but it was for a brief period only. The physicians, knowing that delirium would attack him again, administered a sleeping draught. The poor suffering form was calmed he slumbered for a couple of hours, and at half-past two gently passed away. BIOGRAPHY OF THR DECEASED. Wherever the fact of Mr Parry's death has be- come known, the sincerest regret was expressed. All classes felt that a young life full of brightest promise had been cut down, they felt, too, of the young widow's loss, of the mother's sorrow, and of the blighted hopes of the father who had dreamed of brilliant achievements which he knew the future had in store for his eldest son. From baby- hood Mr Haydn Parry was a musician, and, under the guidance, or. shall we eay, with the inherited enthusiasm ? of his father he soon developed a gift given but to a few. Born at Danvil, Pensylvania, U.S.A.. on April 8, 1864, the early part of his education was received in America, where his father lived for many years. On their return to this country Mr Parry completed his course at the University College, Aberystwith. He early showed an aptitude for composition, and at the Liverpool Eisteddfod in 1884 he took the JE20 prize for a sonata. Two years later Mr Parry, out of 300 candidates, was appointed assistant-master at HAITOW, q,nd a year later received the apoint- saent of organist at the parish church. In 1890 he was also elected a professor at the Guild-hall. The same year his cantata, Gwen," was produced at the St. James's-hall, where it met with great success. His most important venture, however, was the production of a comic opera, Cigarette." The experiment was watched with some anxiety, both by the young composer and his wide circle of friends. Undoubted success was attained both in Cardiff and in London, critics and public com- bining in praising the piece and believing -that the author of such melodious and stirring music would produce really great work later on. In August, 1892, "Cigarette" was produced at the Cardiff Theatre Royal. 'The next worn was on somewhat similar lines. Miami" was produced in the Princess Theatre, London, in 1893, and failed, according to the unanimous opinion of the critics, through no fault of the composer. On the contrary, it was predicted that a man who could create the music found in "Cigarette" and Miami was worth watching. This now is finished. Death has laid its hand on the life that seemed fated to be great, and the work that might have been done is left undone, or done by others. Part of this is a piece ,on which Mr Parry was at work for the next musical festival at Cardiff. All Wales will grieve at the loss of its brilliant son. The deceased, who was assistant professor at the Musical College of Wales, was a successful song writer, his best known being Strive, Wait, and Pray (words by Adelaide Procter). Regret," and Abide with me."

PENARTH CONSERVATIVE CLUB.

LORD BUTE AND BARRY HARBOUR.

HECHABITISM AT PENARTH.

PENARTH LOCAL BOARD. i :

THE CONTINUITY QUESTION.

THE ALLEGED PRIZE FIGHT AT…

EASTER VESTRY AT PENARTH.

PENARTH POLICE COURT.

ITEMS FROM BARRY DOCKS

LOCAL FOOTBALL.

BARRY DISTRICT SCHOOL BOARD.

CONGL Y CYMRY. .

PERMANENT INFECTIOUS HOSPITAL…

THE BARRY BURGLAR ON HIS TRIAL.

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