Symud i'r prif gynnwys
Cuddio Rhestr Erthyglau

19 erthygl ar y dudalen hon

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SEARCHING FOR GUY FAÙX,

EARL RUSSELL AND THE CATTLE…

THE RUSH TO THE BAR.

THE NEGRO IN JAMAICA.

A TRAGEDY ON THE HIGH SEAS.

Newyddion
Dyfynnu
Rhannu

A TRAGEDY ON THE HIGH SEAS. On Saturday morning, the Eliza, Captain Nickerson, from Mobile with cotton, arrived in the Mersey. She displayed the flag for the river police, and a boat put off to her. On the arrival of the police, the first mate, Henry Frederick Williams, surrendered himself to the police, on the charge 01 having, as he expressed it, caused the death of William M'Guinness, a seaman:— It appeared that the Eliza left Liverpool in 1864. Her last destination was Mobile, where the captain took on board several new hands, including the de- ceased, and the crew became what was termed a rough lot. The cargo consisted of 3,650 bales of cotton, of which a portion was stowed in the hatchways. She sailed from Mobile on the 28th of December last; and all went well until Wednesday, the 31st of January, when she was about 100 miles west of Cape Clear. About nine o'clock in the morning of the day some bales of cotton which were lashed on the aft hatches broke loose, owing to the listing of the ship. According to the testimony of Timothy Mc. Sweeney, a seaman, the prisoner then came forward and ordered the deceased and others to go and assist in making all secure. The deceased, who had joined the ship to come to Liverpool by the rud," refused to do so, and alleged that he had no right to do so, because he had not joined to interfere with the cargo, but only to assist in navigating the ship. It would then appear that the prisoner, who had previously heard of some things against him, went into his cabin and obtained a heavy oaken club, -which he had got the carpenter to make for him, and this he hid under his coat. He then went forward again, and, addressing the deceased, told him to go aft that he might "log him," meaning that he might enter his name in the log. Deceased replied, I know nothing about your log or your laws. What do you want me for?" Prisoner asked "Do you refuse to go?" and deceased said, "No, I shall not." Prisoner then drew forth the club, and struck deceased on the left side of his head. Deceased threw up his hands and grasped the prisoner by the arm and throat. Pri oner again struck him violently on the crown of the head, in- flicting a wound over an inch in length, which bled freely. The man then staggered, but prisoner recovered, and struck deceased a third blow on the right side of his head. Deceased fell to the deck, and the prisoner ran aft. The deceased got up and calling after the prisoner, applied a filthy epit to him, said he could not break his head yet, and lif he would come forward he would fight him nan fashion. Deceased was taken into the fora htle, and his head was washed by a seaman name I iraham. He soon became senseless, and lied i i >. I > before midnight. The next morning he body was sewn up in canvas and committed to he sea, the secoud mate reading the burial service. should be mentioned that all through the voyage, the aptain was suffering severely from ague fever, and WaS unable to leave his cabin. The captain has now charged three of the crew with mutiny.

THE A ST OF GORDON.

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THE WOES OF HAIRDRESSING.

AN EXTRAORDINARY TRIAL.

Ithemarket S.

NOBLE GIFTS AND BENEFACTIONS.

THE LAW RELATING TO BIDDINGS…

A NOBLE STUD!

THE CASE OF CHARLOTTE WINSOR.

UNLUCKY WEDDING DAYS.

MELANCHOLY ACCIDENT AT A SHOOTING…

A REMARKABLE WILL CASE.