Symud i'r prif gynnwys
Cuddio Rhestr Erthyglau

22 erthygl ar y dudalen hon

<9ur Ifonkit Cormptbtnt.

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Dyfynnu
Rhannu

<9ur Ifonkit Cormptbtnt. [We deem It right to state that we do not at all times: identify ourselves with our Correspondent's OplntODe.) Although the Queen completed her sixty-sixth year on Sunday, the official celebration of her Majesty's birthday will not take place until Saturday, the 6th June, when Ministers and members of both Houses of Parliament will again be in London after the recess. The Ministers and great officers of State give grand banquets to commemorate the occasion, the Prince of Wales generally dining with the Premier. The Government offices in White- hall, the clubs in Pall Mall, and the shops of the lioyal tradesmen in such thoroughfares as St. James s-street, Piccadilly, Waterloo-place, and Regent-street, are illuminated with devices of all descriptions. Fine weather, with not much moonlight, makes this spectacle one very well worth going to see, and the streets are always crowded for hours at such celebrations. Politicians, albeit we are in the Whitsun recess, are speculating on the probable events of the next few months, which under any circum- stances. cannot fail to be full of importance. What is Mr. Gladstone going to do ? He has declared that his intervention in public affairs can now be measured by months or even by weeks, and there is a belief that if he could bring about a satisfactory settlement of the Russian difficulty he would retire from office. One thing is tolerably certain, that the right hon. gentleman does not intend to sit in the new Parliament. He has hinted this over and over again. The work of the present Parliament has told severely upon ( him, and he has not now the physical strength which he possessed in IS79 and 1B80, when"he delivered his Midlothian speeches. The entire aspect of the man is one of weariness and a desire for rest. The session has been a most harrassing one for the Prime Minister. One vote of cen- sure after another has had to be beaten off, the Soudan Expedition has come to nought, the Russians hesitate over the negotiations, and the national expenditure has been raised for this year to the vast sum of one hundred millions sterling. Such accumu- lated anxieties tell upon a man who has lived in the world more than three-quarters of a century, and who began his official career over fifty years 0-- ago. After the death of Lord Palmerston Earl Russell came to the Premiership as a matter of course, for he had already held that office; but in the case of Mr. Gladstone's retirement no one can say who the new Prime Minister would be. The Marquis of Hartington has led the Liberal party in the Commons, where there is no doubt the head of tho Government should sit.' But the noble lord's father, the Duke of Devonshire, is a man of advanced years—the marquis himself is 52—so that Ms tenure of a sea £ in the House Qf Commons would not probably be a long one. p I Earl Granville has often been mentioned as having a reversionary right to the Premiership but he is 70 years of age, and younger men are now required for the exacting duties of the State. Each political party believes that the General Election will give it a majority; but never was an estimate more difficult to make in the face of the extended franchise and the multiplication of electoral divisions. By the adjournment of the House of Commons to the 4th of June the annual wrangle over tho Derby holiday was saved. Many members objected to a branch of the Legislature sus- pending its business because a horse race was being run on Epsom Downs, holding that a sort of legislative encouragement was thus given to the sport; but if the House had sat it is doubtful whether a quorum of forty members would have assembled to discuss the contents of the notice paper. The House, therefore, invariably adjourned for the Derby on a division. The people of London read of the Queen's journey along Deeside in an open carriage, and in splendid weather, while a pitiless rainstorm was passing over the metropolis. It was not one of those gentle showers of midsummer which are often so welcome, but a cold descent mixed with hail, which lasted several hours. Steamboat trips from the Thames had been advertised for that day in all directions but excursions of this sort naturally had to be given up. It has been a strange ungenial season. The absence of sunshine has retarded the growth of the fruit to an extent which is perceptible at a glance at any fruiterer's shop in a principal London thoroughfare. Oranges are now practically past, apples are not much better; cherries and straw- berries cannot come to maturity without sun- shine. One suggested reason for the long con- tinuance of chilly winds is the presence of icebergs in the Atlantic, where they are found in targe numbers. The Inman steamer City of Berlin ran into one of these in a fog, and narrowly escaped destruction. On the 1st of June there will be opened to the public the largest caravanserai which has yet been attempted in London. At one time New York carried off the palm for vast hotels but in this respect the British capital is now competing with the Empire city. The Grand, at Charing- cioss, at the Corner of Northumberland Avenue, is of immense extent and imposing dimensions. Next was raised the First Avenue, iri Holborn, and now comes the Hotel Metropole, an enormous structure extendingfrom Northumberland Avenue to Whitehall-place with dining accommodation for a thousand guests and with 600 bedrooms. I ZD Charing-cross is rapidly becoming the centre of large hotels. Thcse are Morley's, the Golden Cross, the South-Eastern, the Grand, and the Metropole. A stranger coming to- London ought not to be under the slightest apprehension as to obtaining quarters. A cab fare to Charing- cross will present him with such a variety of temporary homes as can be found in no other part of the metropolis. The crickfet season is now getting advanced, as already some important county matches have been played. The sport lately has been much interfered with in several parts of the country, through the rain. When we have had a long spell of warm dry weather, and the wicket becomes^ hard, a few showers are beneficial; but continuous heavy rain saturates the ground, and renders play an impossibility. Oxford have lost their second trial match by fifty runs, their antagonists being Lancashire. The rival L niversities are likely to be strong this year in batting, but weak in bowling. But, apart from this, both sides will endeavour to put a thoroughly representative team into the field to do battle on the eventful day at Lords. Last year, it will be remembered the Light Blues were defeated. Nottingham, the champion county for the last two years, can now play their full eleven, as all the members of Shaw's Australian team are back in England. They started last September, and have had a very successful tour, winning most of the contests they were engaged in. A county that may be mentioned as having commenced the season well, is Surrey: this eleven up to the present has been successful ia all their engagements. G. R.

DARING DIAMOND ROBBERY IN…

SAD DEATHS IN A LIMESILIT.

[No title]

, REPORTED MASSACRES ON THE…

STRAITGE CONDUCT OF A GENTLEMAN.

CHURCH BUILDING SOCIETY.

ITHE MINT.

A VENERABLE JOURNAL.

COMPULSORY INSURANCE IN THE…

BREWERS' PETITION.

! SAD DEATH OF A CLERGYMAN.

| RUSSIA'S NEW SUBJECTS-

THE REBELLION IN THE NORTH-WEST…

HERALDS OF SUMMEER'S APPROACH.

IRISH COTTAGE INDUSTRIES.

!RECREATION GROUNDS AND THE…

LUNACY LAWS.

SHOCKING SCENE AT AN EXECUTION.

t DEATH OF VICTOR HUGO.

COMMUNISTIC RIOTS IN PARIS.

EPITOME OF NEWS.