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WHAT THE PAPERS SAY OF THE…

THE CUSTOMERS AT OUR SHOP!

A HINT TO VOLUNTEERS.

A SKETCH OF THE POPE IN PUBLIC…

A PERSECUTED PRIEST.

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PARLIAMENTARY SCRAPS.

A MYSTERY TO BE UNRAVELLED.

AN ODD PARLIAMENTARY SCENE.

Newyddion
Dyfynnu
Rhannu

AN ODD PARLIAMENTARY SCENE. The Parliamentary limner of the Illustrated Times thus de- scribes an odd Parliamentary scene In the House of Commons last week, when the.May- nooth debate was on, there was a scene that no one ever saw before, and which we hope will never be seen again. Mr. Spooner was at all times an odd-looking man. His features are strongly marked; he has a wonderful nose, and a not less remarkable chin. He is short, round- shouldered, and his clothes, which look as if they were made by a village tailor, hang loosely upon his oddly- shaped person. But Mr. Spooner, as he addressed the House on this occasion, was the strangest sight we ever saw. He is, as our readers have been before in- formed, nearly blind, and, therefore, he was obliged to come down from his usual place and stand at the table, that he might have the advantage of a couple of can- dles, which had been brought in for his special use. And, further, he wore a pair of large goggles (i.e. round projecting spectacles, guarded at the side by black silk to protect his eyes from the glare of the light); and as the old man stood there in the blaze of the gas from above, and the light of the two extra candles shining full upon his strange features, and in hollow, pulpit tones poured forth his discourse, there was some- thing almost weird and ghostly in the scene. Mr. Spooner spoke for nearly an hour and a half, and we suppose that the reporters in their loft above must have heard him, but very few of the members, we venture to say, heard a word; for, in the first place, nobody listened; and, in the second, there was such a buzz ot conversation pervading the House from the be. ginning to the end of his speech that it was quite im- possible for even the most attentive to catch more than now and then a word. It has become the practice of late years to allow Mr. Spooner to exercise: his hobby- horse alone. Nobody has supported and nobody an- swered him. Maynooth has long been voted a bore which is thoroughly hated in the House, and excites now no feeling out of doors. On this occasion, how- ever, the rule was relaxed. Mr. Newdegate and Mr. Pope Hennessy got up to support, and Mr. Patrick O'Brien to reply; and Mr. Hadfield said something, but what it was we have not the smallest notion. We saw him standing high up near the wall, throwing his arms about violently, and could see that he was in a great passion; and now and then we were conscious of some inarticulate shriek above the elemental row, but nothing more, for as soon as Mr. Spooner sat down the buzz of talk broke out into a storm. It was near dinner- time, and the members were determined to have the division before they went to feed. Mr. Pope Hennessy is bidding high for the ear of the House, but he cannot be said to have fairly gotten it yet; and we question whether he ever will prove an effective speaker. Mr. Patrick O'Brien's quotation of a saying of O'Connell, that there is nothing so dangerous as a pious fool," though true ought to have been kept in. A young man should never try to wound an old man. Mr Spooner, though weak, is sincere; and, as he has no long to live, it is as well to let him ride this broker winded, spavined old hobby of his for an hour or tv; every year in quietude. It pleases him, and does litfe harm to any one now. It is a curious fact, that a that very night the poor old gentleman lost his wi. She had been imbecile, or something worse, for a l<g time, and took her flight to better worlds that nighf

A GOOD TIME COMING! '

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