Symud i'r prif gynnwys
Cuddio Rhestr Erthyglau

16 erthygl ar y dudalen hon

49ur IMwt Corrtspoittat.

THE VOLUNTEER REVIEW AT BRIGHTON.

[No title]

DEPARTURE OF EMIGRANTS.

BANQUET TO MR. GEORGE HUDSON.

THIEVES' SUPPER.

[No title]

THE COLLECTION OF TAXES.

DEATH OF PROFESSOR MAGNUS.

BABOO KESHUB CHUNDER SEN.

:GOOD FRIDAY IN THE EAST-END…

DEATH OF THE DUCHESS OF BERRI:

Newyddion
Dyfynnu
Rhannu

DEATH OF THE DUCHESS OF BERRI: On Sunday last, there died in Styria a Princess who m^ny years ago played no unimportant part in the fffairs of Europe. Caroline Ferdinanda, Louisa, Duchess of Berri, daughtrr of Francis I., King of the Two Sicilies, sister of liomba, and aunt of the ex-King Francis II., was born towards the close of the last ceutury. At the age of eighteen she was married to the Duchess de Berri, younger son of Charles X., then Due d'Artois. Her married life barely lasted three years. When her husband was assassinated in 1820, the Duchess was expecting the birth of the Due de Bordeaux, known to the Legitimists of France as Henry V., and to the world at large as the Comte de Chambord. Throughout the reigns of Louis XVIII. and of Charles X. the widowed Princess took no active part in public life. After the Revolution of July she quitted France and took refuge at Rome, where she con- tracted a secret marriage with the Marquis Lucchesi Palli. In 1832 she suddenly landed in France, and headed an abortive insurrection in La Vendee, the object of which was the dethronement of the Orleanist dynasty, and the restoration of the legitimate branch of the House of Bourbon. But the times had gone by whm such a rising was possible, and the Legitimist crusade of 1832 was an almost contemptible parody of the great insurrection with which the name of La Vendue is inseparably associated in history. The Duchess, who travelled about Brittany in peasant's costume, was arrested, happily for herself and her adherents, before any st rious outbreak had taken place. Kept as a State prisoner in the Citadel of Blaye, under the custody of Marshal Bugeaud, the difficulty of how to deal with her was a source of extreme embarrassment to Louia Phillipe and his Ministers. The difficulty was, however, solved by the sudden discovery that the widow of the Due de Berri was in the family-way. The pathos of this unsentimental ending to a romantic enterprise afforded the French Government a happy excuse for releasing their prisoner, who, in order to preserve her reputation, confessed the fact of her marriage with the Marquis Palli, After her relase from prison, the heroine of the second La Vend 6 d rising led a very quiet and retired life. She has lived to see the House of Orleans in exile, the Bourbons expelled from Spain, Naples, and Parma. She has witnessed the ri^e and fall of a second French Republic. She has beheld another Napoleon reigning as Emperor in Francs. Indeed, well nigh the only member of the Royal houses of Europe with whom she was connected, either by birth or by marriage, whose fortunes have experienced no change during the last forty years, is her son, who remains in 1870 what he was in 1830—Count of Chambord, of Frohsdorf, in Lower Austria.

THE UNIVERSITY BOAT RACE.

CHARGE AGAINST A BOY OF THIRTEEN.

AMENDMENT OF THE GAME LAWS.

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