Cuddio Rhestr Erthyglau

19 erthygl ar y dudalen hon

PROFESSOR MAX MULLER AT BIRMINGHAM.

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PROFESSOR MAX MULLER AT BIRMINGHAM. On Monday night Professor Max Mtiller delivered, in the Birmingham Town-hall, the president's inaugural address on the opening of the winter session of the Birmingham and Midland Institute. He began by comparing the measure of social and political freedom which we now enjoyed with that which qbtained twenty years ago, and observed that even in the brightest days of Republicanism and freedom in Athens and Rume there was never a time when the liberty acoorded to the individual was larger than at the present day—at all events, in England. Hip Ger- man and Italian friends, however, while recognizing that full political liberty reigned here, thought there was little intellectual freedom, and that, however it might be in London and a few other large cities, the Universities—the nurseries of thought and learning- were fettered by the mediaeval spirit of monastic institutions and the principles of scholastic philo- sophy, which contrasted ill with the freshness and freedom of Continental Universities. He insisted on the necessity of making education compul- sory and congratulated Birmingham on having been a tyrant in this respect. Yet compulsory education was not without its dangers. It was like a powerful engine that required careful watching lest it should produce monotonous uniformity. He characterized English spelling as a national misfortune. It handicapped the English child to an extent that would be thought in. credible if it were not demonstrated by statistics. He knew the difficulties of spelling reform, but they were not insuperable. Academical education, the Professor urged, should be aa free as possible. He dwelt at some length on the evils which resulted from examinations conducted in a wrong manner. He was a believer in examina- « condemned their being made the end instead i» Vr8^.8' should rather be taught to take delight in the acquisition of knowledge for its own sake. In reference to scholarship prizes, the Professor re- marked that the plea usually advanced for them was that they enabled the children of poor parents to obtain the highest University education, but in practice be generally found that those who secured those prizes were the children of parents who were well able to pay for their education. The end, he thought, would be more effectually obtained by cheapening education so as to bring it within the reach of the poorest.

OPENING OF FIRTH COLLEGE BY…

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THE FIGHT WITH THE UTE INDIANS.

THE EARTHQUAKE IN HUNGARY.

TERRIBLE ACCIDENT BY FIRE…

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MR. GLADSTONE INTERVIEWED.

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THE ACCIDENT ON THE MICHIGAN…

PEASANT PROPRIETORS IN IRELAND.

THE MASSACRE AT CABUL.

FREE TRADE M AMERICA.

ARTIFICIAL BREEDING OF FISH.

THE LATE CONSUL HOPKINS.

SCIENTIFIC AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION.

DINING EN ROUTE.

A HOG-SCRAPING MACHINE.

■ & The FOREIGN COAL and IRON…