Cuddio Rhestr Erthyglau

11 erthygl ar y dudalen hon

".-----[ALL BIGHTS RESERVED.]

A CABINET MINISTER OF HEALTH.

SOME FACTS ABOUT THE RUSSIAN…

GOSSIP ON DRESS.

Mlt. LOWELL ON INTERN ATION…

[No title]

----CHILD MURDER AT TRAME.

THE BOARD OF TRADE RETURNS.

A SAD DOMESTIC STORY.

Newyddion
Dyfynnu
Rhannu

A SAD DOMESTIC STORY. William Charles Patten, 31, a florist, was charged on a warrant, at Marylebone Police-court, London, with threatening to stab Lilla, his wife, whereby she went in fear of some bodily harm. The prosecutrix said she bad been living apart from her husband for about two months. On Tuesday last she met him, and under threats used by him she went to 50, Foley- street, where he lived, and remained with him until eleven o'clock on Wednesday morning, when she determined to leave. When she left the house he followed her, used bad language, and said he would dig her eye out with the penknife he then bad in his hand. He had threatened to throw vitriol on to her face. In reply to the magistrate, the prosecutrix said she had quietly submitted to the will of the prisoner as she was afraid of him. He had got into her room, and taken some of her things away. War- rant Officer Clyde spoke to apprehending the prisoner, who told him that he knew nothing about the threats. The prisoner, who spoke with some emotion, said his wife bad been a misery to him ever since he had been married. They were married while he was a member of the Metropolitan Police Force, and in consequence of her bad conduct he was transferred to other divisions. She had summoned him so many times at Clerkenwell Police court that, although not once convicted, he was com- pelled to leave the force. By the influence of gentle- men who knew his character he got an appointment at Holloffuv Gaol, but she continued her annoyance, and in the end he had to resign that appointment, leaving with a first-class testimonial. After this he found it extremely difficult to get employment, and in his trouble he committed himself, and was sent to prison. After his release some detective officers used i their influence on his behalf, and he secured a good appointment. His wife, however, soon found out the gentleman who gave him the appointment, and in consequence of her going to that gentleman he (the prisoner) was very soon afterwards told that he was net wanted any longer. Now, he added, with deep emotion, he was selling flowers in the street for a living. He produced a testimonial he had received from the Countess Enniskellen, which he handed to the magistrate for examination. His reason for leaving his wife was because he had seen her associa- ting with strange men. Officer Clyde said the pri- soner resigned the police force in 1880. Mr. Cook said the story, as placed before him by both sides, was very inconsistent. Under all the circumstances he should deem it sufficient to call upon the prisoner to enter into his own recognisances in £50 to keep the peace for six months.

CORPORATE PROPERTY AND LEGACY…

[No title]