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" THE WAR IN AMERICA.

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THE WAR IN AMERICA. The Royal mail steamship Africa, which sailed from Boston on the 16th, and Halifax, on the 18th nit., has just arrived in Liverpool. The summary of her news had been anticipated. We extract, however, the following from the latest papers :— Capture of Culpepper. A correspondent, writing from the Rappahan- nock, on the 14th Sept., says :— « MíLjor-General Pleasanton, with his cavalry force under Generals Buford, Gregg, and Kil- patrick, crossed the Rappahannock yesterday, and advanced to the banks of the Eapidan. Buford's division came up with Stuart's rebel cavalry and artillery on the heights this side of Brandy Station, ■and drove them from crest to crest by a series ofbril- liantand gallant charges, General Kilpatrick's com- mand connected with Buford's on the left at Brandy Station, having crossed at Kell's Ford. General Gregg left Sulphur Springs at daylight, and joined Pleasanton and Buford at Culpepper, having found Jones's brigade of rebel cavalry at Muddy Run, and scattered them by shells and a charge, but not until they had fired the bridge. Gregg's men put it out, however, and replanked the structure in a few mo- ments, so that the whole command crossed upon it. General Gregg continued to drive Jones before ff1 reached Culpepper at the same moment with the rest of the command. Here the advance arrived just in time to see a train of cars, with stores, leave for the South. Our men charged through the town with the most splendid gallantry, capturing 104 prisoners and three guns, two 12 and one 6-pounder. These latter were posted on a commanding eminence just beyond the town of Culpepper, and were charged upon by General Custer, of General Kilpatrick's division, and taken, with nearly all their men. The charge is described as having been one of unequalled gallantry. The brigade was obliged to dash through the town and down a steep hill, through a ravine, and then up a deep and very high hill to the battery, which, meanwhile, was belching forth its shell and canaster upon their ranks. But it could not retard the speed nor daunt the spirit of the I Boy General of the Golden Locks' and his brave troops. Buford's division passed on in pursuit of the flying enemy. Col. Chapman, of the 3rd Indiana Cavalry, commanding 1st brigade, pursued them past Cedar Mountain, and the whole command followed up to the vicinity of the Eapidan, within two miles of which they encamped last night. The fight was. opened by Buford, who had the centre advance, and who knew exactly where to look for tne enemy, as he has fought the same ground over several times. General Custer was slightly wounded by a shot, which killed his horse and came near killing the general. Lieutenant Benjamin Hutchings, 6th United States Cavalry, was grazed by a piece of shell which took off the 5F °. -^is.r0rd?r^- Tho lieutenant colonel of the 15th^ Virginia Cavalry was captured in a skirmish three miles this side of Culpepper. The bugler of company E, 8th Illinois, was killed. We captured a large quantity of ordnance stores in the railroad depot at Culpepper. The guns were English, with sabre bayonets. The citizens of Culpepper say that Stuart reviewed '6,000 rebel cavalry there on Saturday, and that he was in com- mand yesterday." Peace Resolutions in Virginia Legislature. ^r^the Virginian Senate on the9th of September, Mr. Collier submitted the following preamble and resolutions :— «lW!I?ea^t^e constitution of the Federal Union oi the late United States was established bv the sovereign separate action of the nine States by which it was first formed, and the number of the United States was afterwards, from time to time enlarged by the admission of other States sepa- rately, and whereas that constitution failed to in- corporate or indicate any method by which any one or more of the States might peaceably retire from the obligations of Federal duty imposed by it on each and every other State in the Union- and whereas it is consistent with the Republican creed, on which the whole complex system is founded, that a majority of the States might peacefully disannul the compact as to any party to it; and whereas a conjunction in the Federal relations with the United States did arise in 1861 then culminated in a crisis, in which certain of the si&veholding States, by conventional action of their several sovereign people, in solemn form, declared and promulgated their desire and determination no longer to yield obedience to the constitution ana laws of the Federal Union, as authoritative over them, in that specific form, and whereas the executive branch of that Government, with the oc- casional sanction of the Federal legislature, in the progress of belligerent events, has proceeded by force of arms to attempt to execute its laws within the disaffected States, without applying to the States remaining in the Union to ascer- tain whether they would agree that the dis- affected States might depart in peace; and whereas these disaffected States are not, nor ever wepe, under any obligation to that general Govern- ment, except such as were self-imposed and ex- plicitlydefined is concert and comity with the other States, each being a contracting party with every other; in a compact to which there was and is no-other party; and whereas the war waged on these States by that general Government, which is the" creature of the States who armed it with power, deemed adequate to the common protection of thep all, no less in their reserved rights than in. their foreign relations—a war into which these Sta;tQa were thus precipitated-is yet being prose- cuted with aspiring pre-eminence of craft and crime, although some of them, -by large and earnest expressions of public or party opinion within their borders, have shown that they are constrained to contribute to its prosecution very much against their will, and to their own great de- trj^ent; and whereas any appropriate means, the tuiiely use of which was omitted in the outset to pr.&Keiit the war, is not only a proper resort in its progress, but is dictated and constrained to by all thfe sanctions of Christian civilisation. fIe'1, Easolved, therefore, by the General As- .sCTWHy of Virginia, That three commissioners from, this State to each of the States remaining in tlWUnioll be appointed by the joint vote of the 1 t jro.houses of the General Assembly, whose duty it ■, shafts be, under instructions to be prepared by the < Governor of the State, and approved by the con- 1 ctflrfent vote of each house of the General Assembly J tojepair forthwith to the capital of each of the 1 that remain in that Union, and make known c .8. Governor of each,, that the State of C V.ii-ginia, appealing from the usurped power of the, -n!Qr.. who are charged with administering the f Gwemmerit of that Union, exercised in' the con- s duet; of this war, demands of those States with t jfrhom she contracted, that they severally will, by t the ballot box, as the Union was formed and'en- 0 iarged, decide, as solemnly andf ormally astheydid in a that transaction, whether they will consent that she ° ■oe allowed thencerorth to beseparated from them in J peaee; proviaed, however, that this State, having a » ot'ier States m forming a Confederacy, and a -I.MT to rsS"ard scrupulously the obligations tl oon.— a with her Confederates, shall not proceed -A "^proceeding into full execution until a IiG'iii shall agree to co-act in insfcitu- ir ^'a commission, and to this end the .] e -ofTO-HOi- is Authorised to communicate this pro- *-e eeedmg-to tne governor of each of the Confederate w a7 ocsues, inviting taeir several concurrence and ai coacion m tins proposed mission to the late co- di States, but not to the Government of ,that Union, because it was and is the creature of the States, and should be their servant to do their will when certainly ascertained. 2. Resolved,—As the opinion of this General Assembly, the undertaking to speak and to act for the sovereign people of Virginia, although we are but the ordinary legislature thereof, that in case the men who are charged with administering the Government of the United States shall refuse our commissioners transit and sojourn into and in those States for the exclusive purposes of this mission, which are avowed, such failure of our effort will but demonstrate to them the fearful extent of absolute rule over them by those men, and make our effort a more memorable instance of patriotic exertion and peaceful magnanimity, dis- played in a well-meant attempt to cultivate peace on earth and good will among men. "3. Resolved,-That in initiating this mission for peace, this General Assembly doth unequivo- cally disavow any desire, or design, or willingness, that the Confederate administration shall relax its exertions, ^or tne people theirs, to advance and establish the cause to which we are pledged in our fortunes, and by our victories, to the utmost of our talents, to use them in support of the separate independence of the States." The offer of the resolution excited some debate. The question on the adoption was laid over. A resolution was offered by Mr. James, of Bote- tourt and Craig, for confiscating or sequestrating the property of deserters from the Confederate army. JYh. Hall, of Wetzell, said the constitution would not allow confiscation beyond the term of life. But the remedy for desertion did not lie in that direction. The evil was caused by the shameful conduct of those who have the oversight of the soldiers, and particularly the officers in Richmond. lie proceeded to speak with much severity and bitterness of General Winder's department, and also that of the Surgeon-General. He hoped, too, that the Legislature would rebuke Jeff. Davis before it adjourned.

L ALLEGED- CRUELTY BY A SCHOOL;…

MM, BEhTWCK, M.P, ON THE AGRI..CULTURAL…

WITHDRAWAL OF THE CONFEDERATE-COMMISSIONER.

THE HON. CHARLES SUMNER'S…

[No title]

NEGLECTING TO BURY A CHILD.

SIR ROBERT PEEL AT TAMWORTH.

THE GREAT EASTERN IN ANOTHER…

OCCUPATION OF FORT WAGNER…

COMPLETION OF THE GEARING-CROS8.…