Symud i'r prif gynnwys
Cuddio Rhestr Erthyglau

16 erthygl ar y dudalen hon

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FEABFUL COLLIERY EXPLOSION'.

THE MYSTERIOUS DEATHS AT MILE-END.

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ITERRIBLE CONFLAGRATION IN…

I EFFORTS TO ESTABLISH PEACE…

RAISING THE SUNKEN STEAMER…

DEATH OF THE DUKE OF CLEVELAND.

TAKING LEAVE OF A CONVICTED…

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DEATH OF TWO FEMALES FROM…

Newyddion
Dyfynnu
Rhannu

DEATH OF TWO FEMALES FROM STARVATION. Great excitement prevails in Chelsea about a painful Ica ie which has just been brought to light. Two sisters, who had seen better days, have met with untimely deaths through the want of proper sustenance. Three weeks ago a man between thirty and forty years of age, and who then gave the name of Selby, took an unfurnished front room on the first floor, at No. 4, Durham-street, Chelsea, at the rate of three shillings and sixpence per week, as he alleged for the occupancy of two of his maiden sisters, but in reality it turned out afterwards that the room was hired for himself and three sisters. From that time to the present nothing was seen of the deceased by any persons in the house, and even the surviving sister and brother appear to have lived in a most secluded manner, as they were seldom heard except at night. The stench which latterly came from the room was so great that the landlord attributed it to the dirty habits of his new lodgers, and determined to see Selby, but never could do so until Friday morning last, when coming home from breakfast, Selby then told Matthews that he was in great trouble, that one of his sisters had died on the previous Monday at ten o'clock, and then pausing for a little time, added that his other sister had died on the Tuesday at ten o'clock, and that he did not know what to do, as he could not get an order for their burial without a doctor's certificate. He asked Mr. Matthews not to tell Mrs. Matthews or anybody else about the affair; but of course Mr. Matthews felt it his duty to take some steps in the matter, and communicated the facts of the case to his wife, requesting her, as he was compelled to re- sume his work, to call upon Mr. Green, the coroner's officer, which mandate she lost no time in obeying. I The coroner's officer arrived in the afternoon, and accompanied by Mrs. Matthews proceeded to the room, which was locked inside, and an intimation that if the door was not unfastened it would be forced open, gained them admission. A sad spectacle presented itself. Stretched before them lay the de;id bodies of two females, in such a state of decomposition that maggots were upon them, and they resembled skele- tons covered with green tissue paper more than human bodies. Both were naked, with the exception of a chemise; one was stretched out on an iron bedstead with web sacking, aud the other lay on the floor, crouched up like a dog in one corner of the room. The only other articles of furniture were two chairs. An inquest was held at the Surprise Tavern, Christ- church-terrace, on Saturday, by Mr. Bird, deputy coroner. The man Selby was called, and said that his right name was Moss. He had oeen a solicitor's clerk. The deceased were his two sisters, Emma Moss, aged thirty-eight, and Jane Moss, aged forty. The surviving sister, who lived with them, said.she could not get them to take any food. Mr. Thomas Dickinson, the surgeon who had made a post-mortem examination, said that he found no traces of food in either of their stomachs, and it was his opinion that they died fram exhaustion from fever, or the want <y proper sustenance. The jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical evidence.

A PANIC IN THE ADELPIII THEATRE.

DOUBLE EXECUTION AT LEEDS.

A MATRIMONIAL DIFFICULTY:…

IFATAL ACCIDENT TO A YORK…

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