Symud i'r prif gynnwys
Cuddio Rhestr Erthyglau

9 erthygl ar y dudalen hon

THE CATTLE PLAGUE.

Newyddion
Dyfynnu
Rhannu

THE CATTLE PLAGUE. A 'Memorandum on the principles and practice of disinfection, as applicable to the present epidemic of cattle disease "has been prepared by Dr. J. L W. Ihudiohum, by direction of the lords of the council. The paper, which is of considerable length, commences with the following definition and general statement of principles: "The term disinfection signifies the removal or destruction, and the subsequent rem-oval of the products of destruction, of all matters actually being or containing products of disease capable of re- producing disease in other animals. If the same processes and means as used for this purpose are applied fe-the purification and deodorisation of places and things not actually infected, but capable or suspected of being infected, then these preventive measures are practically and properly included ■under the definition of disinfection. The re-pro- ducers of the infectious matter or contagion are all kinds of cattle of the ox tribe, which also are at present in this country the only animals liable to its specific effectfa It is probable that the contagion adheres with particular pertinacity to all secretions and discharges from sick animals. For this reason -aaces or droppings, urine, ruminated food, all secretions the mouth, nose, and eyes, and any sore parts of the aurrape of the diseased animals, must be considered the principal and primary carriers of the infectious matter or plague poison. It is also probable that many parts of animals which have died from the cattle plague, or have been billed during advanced stages of the disease, are infectious, some because they are primarily imbued with the contagion, others because they have been in contact with it after the death of the animal. Skins, hides, hair, horns, and hoofs must therefore always be treated with precaution. Tne chances of infection by flesh, fat, cleaned guts, and blood, are, perhaps, more remote, but aannofc be lost sight of. The cattle plague, although affecting every part of the animal, shows its visible edects most extensively in the intestinal canal. It is believed, and apparently upon good grounds, that the mtescinal discharges are the principal agents upon the distribution of which mainly depends the spread of the disorder. It follows from the above that all articles which have been in contact with a diseased aaimal or any of its discharges, particularly its feces, are capable of carrying the infection for an indefinite "imo; and must be looked upon as being actually infectious to other healthy animals. Such are racks of wood or iron; cribs or mangers of wood, iron, or stone; articles used for fastening animals, leather collars and straps, ropes and chains; all harness of any animals used for drawing, and all carts, wagons, and carriages which they have actually been drawing; the stalls or sheds in which animals have been stand. ing; the whole lengths of the gutters and drains ufirough whica their urine las been flowing; the entire surface over which their manure has been drawn, and fF which the removal has been ejected the entire dungheap upon which infected manure has been put, and the fluid contents of the manure pit, or of the special receptacle for the urine; yards or sheds in which cattle have been kept to tread aown long straw, and the whole of such straw and manure, as also the ground beneath them; paths and roaaa upon which diseased cattle have walked or been carried; fields and meadows upon which they have oeefe grazing j all carts, carriages, trucks, and railway J*ucks, m which diseased cattle have been conveyed, sua all the platforms, railings, bridges, and boards ufioa which they have been moved thereto; as also Mi apparatus which has been used to pen, tie, lift, iittai, fewer, and fix them; the clothes, and particu- larly shoes and boots, and iron-pointed sticks of drivers, and their dogs; the apparel of all cattle herds or attendants, particularly their shoes and boots; the shoes and boots of all persons visiting places where diseased cattle are or have been standing; and, in general, the clothes of all persons visiting infected psacfis, ships, and all parts of the platforms, stages, stairs and bridges, hoists and cranes used for embark- ing and landing the animals; markets, and all sheds arnd pens and implements used in contact with cattle; slaughter-houses, and all persons and implements in tkem which have been employed upon sick cattle, as &lso sundry parts or organs which come from sick ani- inals killeiJ in slaughter-houses; knackers' yards, trucks or eartd, hoi see, men, and iaipigments which have been ea^ployed in the disposal of sick or dead animals; wells aM ponds from which diseased cattle have been drinking, or into which any portion of thair excreta has had any opportunity of flowing directly or indirectly; all fodder, grass, hay, clover, &c., and particularly remnants of fodder, upon which diseased cattfe fiave been feeding;, aad, in general, all persons, aftimats, places, buildings, and movable things which have been in contact with matters proceeding from diseased cattle, or with such diseased cattle them- selves. To the above-mentioned places and things any of the processes and agents enumerated and described in the following may have to be applied." Dr; Thudicbum then sets forth in detail the several ,3>iractiees of disinfection, as by earth (burying); by "fine (burning); by chloride of lime, applicable specially to the surfaces of things and places; special directions for the disinfection of stables, sheds, vans, railway snicks, und cattle ships, and of persons and things connected with them; disinfection of live stock. „ A quarantine shed is next described and recommended, as well as a safety dress for inspectors and others who may come in contact with animals actually suffering from the plague. Measures which should be taken on premises where the plague has actually broken out are set forth at length, as well as a mode of disinfecting meadows, fields, roads, &o. The memorandum is con- cluded with the following general recommendations:— cl la conclusion it must be pointed out to farmers, dairymen, and all persons having charge of cattle, that the same great measures which are known to maintain and restore the health of human beings will also main- tain and restore the health of ca.ttle. Pure air dry, spacious, well-ventilated, and well-drained olean sheds; dleau and dry meadows; plenty of pure water; frequent ourrying and washing; the prevention of the develop- ment. by the destruction of the germs, of internal and ex- ternal parasites, particularly entozoa; proper food, in suitable quantities at proper times; protection from in- clement weather; the utmost cleanliness in the removal of manure; the storing of manure at a great distance from the cattle shed; and, in addition, the most con- scientious observance of the precautionary and disin- fecting Measures above described. All these measures agents together will secure the utmost possible he&Ifch Of stock, and the prosperity of the agricul- turist and dairyman. But the neglect of any one of them will make the stock liable to become infected, And the more so the more several or all collateral con- ditions of the healthy existence of animals are neglected. The negligent man is therefore certain to lose, to injure his neighbour by defeating his pre- caution, and to damage society but the watchful and painstaking man will be rewarded not only by the preservation of his property, but particularly by the consciousness that it has been preserved by his own care and attention, and that thereby he has also benefited the state." Meeting at the London Mansion-house. A meeting of the Sanitarium Committee of the Metropolitan Cattle Plague Committee was held at iihe Mansion-house on Saturday, Mr. Gibbins, chair- man of tba Corporation Markets Committee, presiding. Dr. Aldis, medical officer of health for the district of 13t. George, Hanover-square, attended with a memorial signed by upwards of forty of the principal inhabi- tants of Wilton-cresoent and the neighbourhood, one ef whom was Mr. Norton, the Lambeth magistrate, iDirotesimg against the establishment of a sanitarium; as contemplated by the committee, in Kinner- ion-etreet in that neighbourhood, on the ground of the inconvenience it would occasion the com- munity there. He stated that even in the open 'country the -excreta of aniinala affected by the disease was something fearful, ana that he him- self had been ill for nearly two days from the offensive odour which he had experienced at a place in Kent. The chairman (Mr. Gibbins) explained that the object of the committee in establishing sanitariums was to get cowkeepers, whose herds might be attacked, to give to the ceiamittee the earliest information of the attack, ao that the infected animals might be at once removed to an hospital, with a view to a possible cure, or at all events to separate them as early as possible from the rest of the herd which might be free from the disease; and he complained that the Government was thwarting their exertions.—Dr. Aldis, in reply to the chairman, said he did not object to the principle of sanitariums, and if the symptoms of the disease could be early watched by competent persons, and treated by them, great advantage might result in saving the infected beasts. He adverted to a barbarous remedy which was being resorted to in some. plases, viz., of bleeding the infected animals, and compelling them to drink a portion of their own blood, impregnated with salt. He thought the public should be guarded against all secret and barbarous remedies.—Professor Disk, of the Veteriniry College, Edinburgh, in a communication to the committee, stated that they had been very un- successful in their sanitarium in Edinburgh; thirty-six cows having died, and only one being likely to re- cover but in various cowsheds in the City they had twenty-two cows recovering. Much depended, he said, in taking the case as soon as the symptoms made their appearance, and that;it was owing to the loss of time in getting the cows to the sanitarium and to take the medicine that they had been so unsuccessful. He mentioned a remedy, which was being used there with advantage, viz., on the earliest symptoms to give a quart bottle of linseed oil, with half a bottle of whiskey or a half to a pound of salts, and repeat the dose next day if the medicine has not operated.-Dr. Whitmore, the medical officer of health for Marylebone district, reported that the number of cattle usually kept there was 1,313; the number disposed of since June 30, for fear of the cattle disease, 214; and the number disposed of since June 30, in consequence of the disease appearing among them, 112.—Eventually, on the motion of Mr. Rudkin, a resolution was adopted authorising a deputa- tion of the committee to the Lords of the Privy Council, on Monday, at three o'clock, to press the Government for an answer to the application of the committee to be allowed to establish sanitariums in the metropolitan districts. The meeting then separ- ated. „

SINGULAR OHARGE OF HOUSEBREAE-…

THE ELOPEMENT OF A CLEBGWMAW8…

ARREST OF FENIANS IN DUBLIN…

DEATH OF GENERAL LAMORIGIERE.

; VISIT OF THE FYCHOW PARTY…

A BAD CUSTOM IN NEWGATE MARKET.

[No title]

1.HE LATE CHARGE OF CONSPIRACY…