Cuddio Rhestr Erthyglau

5 erthygl ar y dudalen hon

Notes from South Wales.

Newyddion
Dyfynnu
Rhannu

Notes from South Wales. (From our Special Correspondent). The Battle of the Sites. It was generally anticipated that the real competition for the location of the National Library and Museum would lie between Cardiff and Aberystwyth. Swansea, however, has now entered the lists, and Sir J. T. D. Llewellyn is vigorously championing Abertawe. There is a consensus of opinion, however, that Aberystwyth will secure the National Library, and that either Cardiff or Swansea will secure the National Museum. Veteran Welsh Actor. The number of Welshmen who have become prominent on the stage are very few. Perhaps, Mr. Lewis Ball, who died at Teignmouth, the other day, was the only one who attained to anything approaching success during the last decade. Mr. Ball was born at the picturesque little town of Builth Wells, in Breconshire, in October, 1820. He made his first appearance on the stage when he was only three years of age. He acted, as a child, with Mme. Celeste and Ira Aldridge, the black tragedian. In subsequent years he played with Miss Faucit (Lady Martin) and G. V. Brooke, and in the year 1852, he joined Samuel Phelps at Sadler's Wells, and as a Shakesperian clown he attained quite a reputation. In 1881, he joined Mr. Edward Compton's Comedy Company, and for seventeen years played old men in old English Comedy. Mr. Ball retired from the stage seven years ago, and died at Teignmouth as just stated. Prince Llewellyn. We are getting very enthusiastic in Wales in reference to the proposed National Library and Museum. This is most laudable and satis- factory. At the same time it is to be regretted that our patriotism has not yet been strong enough to ensure the erection of a suitable memorial to gallant Prince Llewellyn. It is, indeed, a reflection upon us as a nation that such a memorial has not been erected. I am glad to notice that the reference to the subject made in these notes some weeks ago, has given rise to a coirespondence in the LONDON WELSH- MAN, and it is to be hoped that some practical scheme will be evolved as a result. The North Wales Welsh Conservative paper, Gwalia, com- menting in its leading notes on the correspon- dence, observes :—" Mac Cenedlaetholdeb yn swnio'n dda ar Iwyfan, ond rhyfedd mor ddieffaith ydyw i gynyrchu haelfrydedd hyd yn nod at amcanion teilwng." There is much truth, alas in that observation. Still, I cannot see why we cannot do something to ensure the erection of a memorial to the last real Prince of Wales. Of course, I admit that we have in Wales a class of people who will not raise one finger in a patriotic cause unless they can be the ceffyl blaen, but surely it is not always necessary to consult the recognised leaders." This is a matter which could well be taken up by Young Wales. We have plenty of young Welshmen who would get a memorial erected, if once they can be induced to make a start in the matter. Would it not be possible to have a monument to the dead Prince erected at Llanwrtyd, in the vicinity of which place Prince Llewellyn made his last stand for national independence ? There are thousands of Welshmen visiting Llanwrtyd every summer. Why not arrange to hold a meeting there next July or August, and start a subscription list at once. From my intimate knowledge of Llanwrtyd I am confident that

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WELSH FOLK IN THE WEST.

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Notes from South Wales.