Symud i'r prif gynnwys
Cuddio Rhestr Erthyglau

11 erthygl ar y dudalen hon

TIPYN 0 BOB PETH. ......

Newyddion
Dyfynnu
Rhannu

TIPYN 0 BOB PETH. The funeral of Mr. T. Williams, well known in the Welsh literary world as Trebor Mai, took place on Thursday afternoon, August 9, at Llanrwst, and was very largely attended. The Denbigh Corporation have Anally decided to provide a Smithfielcl for the town. It was resolved to borrow the money of the Local Government Board instead of the Treasury. In a paragraph in a Welsh contemporary about the coming-of- age of Mr. T. E. J. Lloyd, that gentleman is mysteriously de- scribed as Mr. the heir of Plas Tregaiau. The balance sheet has been published of the Wrexham National Eisteddfod of 1876. The receipts were Z3,907, and the expenditure £ 3,844. „ Through the representations of Mr. Osborne Morgan, QAJ., M.P., the post office authorities have consented to open an office ^M^orBirch and Mr. P. H. Chambres are the Hun Secretaries of the Committee formed to obtain subscriptions towards the deficiency of £ 1,500 in the fund of the late Art Treasures Exhibition at Wrexham. ,r Af the meeting of the British Medical Association at Man- chester on Wednesday, Aug. 8, addresses were presented to the Pontypridd surgeons who a sisted in the famous rescue. They are also to receive medals. Lord Newborough has resigned the chairmanship of the Car- narvonshire Quarter Sessions which he has held for many years. The annual festival of choirs forming the Mold Choral Union was held on Tuesday, August 7, in Mold Parish Church. The sermon was preached by the Rev. J. W. Knox-Little, rector of St. Alban's, Manchester. In the evening there was a Welsh service at which the Bishop of St. Asaph preached. The annual exhibition of stock in connection with the Pem- broke Farmers' Club, was held on Tuesday, August 7th, at Monktoii. The lihow was a, very good one, but considerable in- convenience appears to have been occasioned by the absence of any printed catalogue of the entries. Mr. Brinley Richards, with a talented musical party, including one of the rescuers at the Tynewydd Colliery, is making a tour of Wales and some of the principal English towns._ A feature in the programme is Mr. Richards's new composition, "The Men of Wales," and the now celebrated hymn sung in the mine by the entombed colliers. Mr. G. D. Dew, the deputy coroner for Carnarvonshire, hold an inquest at Bangor, on Thursday, Aug. 9, upon the body of Alice Myers, aged seventy-one, a married woman, living in New- lane, who diel from the effects of a fall downstairs on Tuesday, Aug. 7. Medical evidence was given by Dr. Lloyd, and a ver- dict of Accidental death" was returned. On Thursday, August 9, a large meeting was held at Bodfari, Denbigh, for the purpose of forming a district branch of the Church Association. Amongst the speakers were the Rev. Mr. Concanon, secretary of the parent Association, the Rev. J. Williams, Glanmor," South Wales, and several of the local clergy and laymen. The Academy states that Mr. W. St. Chad Boscawen, son of the Rector of Marchwiel, near Wrexham, has just started on a prolonged scientific tour in Babylonia. He will visit the site of Karchemish, discovered by the late Mr. George Smith, and will spend a considerable time in Babylon and Nineveh, with a view to excavating, copying inscriptions, and determining the more important sites. At the Carmarthen police court on Saturday, Aug. 11th, David Joshua, a boy aged nine, was sentenced to six weeks' imprisonment and to receive twelve strokes with a birch rod, for placing a stone between the points on the railway near Llan- pumpsaint station, on the previous Tuesday. Two excursion p MP trains from Aberystwyth were due only a few minutes after the stone was discovered. On Wednesday, Aug, 8th, the marriage of Captain Longcroft, son of Mr. C. R. Longcroft, Llanina, near New Quay, to Miss Catherine Alicia Holcombe, eldest daughter of the late Rev. Essex Holcombe, Casheston, Pembrokeshire, was celebrated at Llanwenog Church. There were great rejoicings, and the bride- groom was presented by his father's tenantry with a massive silver candelabra and five branches. Conwil Church, South Wales, has been re-opened by the Bishop of St. David's, after a restoration, completed through the exertions of Mr. and Mrs. Morgan, of Alltygog, and the vicar, the Rev. J, Morgan, who is also incumbent of Abernant. An ineffectual attempt at restoration was made about fourteen years ago. About £.480 was then laid out, but so badly was the stone work done that it crumbled away, and the church again fell into a dilapidated state. On Thursday, Aug. 9, was brought to a close a grand bazaar, held in the Town Hall, Rhyl, under the patronage of Lord Richard Grosvenor, M.P., Mr. P. Ellis Eyton, M.P., Sir Francis Lycett Sheriff of London, Lady Lycett, and Mr. W. Allen, M.P. for Newcastle-under-Lyne. The profits were in aid of a new parsonage house for the English Wesleyan minister of the Rhyl circuit. The contributions of articles made to Mrs. F. Payne, who superintended the bazaar, were numerous and costly, and a good sum was realised. A writer in Mayfair says thaf Clough's lines- Stoutest and rashest of creatures, mere fool of a Saxon, Him I see frisking and whisking, and ever at swifter gyration Under brief curtain revealing broad acres—not of broad cloth"— refer to the late Mr. Ward Hunt, who was one of the memorable reading party in the Highlands. Mr. Whalley, M.P., has written to a Wrexham paper replying to the statement that he had styled the Irish obstructionists as my honourable friends." He says if he used such expressions, of which he has no recollection, it was to mark his sense of the services rendered by them to the cause of Protestantism, by their candid and manlyexposition so that all who care for their country may now read in it the true intention and design of Popery viz to break np institutions and openly set at defiance all that is understood by AW and order. This is the design of the obstruction, At the last Flint Petty Sessions one woman charged another with using threatening language towards her. It appeared from the evidence that the-defendant had the misfortune to be con- fined of twins, and, strange to say, she attributed that mis- fortune to the compitinant, with whom she had previously been on bad terms. She went to the complainant, and, using a,n oath, threatened to kill her because she had been praying that she (defendant) might have twins. The complainant added In all serioneness, And I never did, your worships." The magistrates dismissed the case, on the payment of costs. On Thursday, August 9, the annual meeting of the Vale of Clwyd Church Sunday School Union was held at Denbigh. There was a large gathering from the schools in union- Henllan, Llanrhaifwte, 1.1anynys, Llandyrnog, Prion, Nantglyn, Bylchan, and Denbigh. The rector of Denbigh presided. The report of the Diocesan Inspector of Schools showed that they had been carefully examined in the Life of Elijah and other subjects, and had passed a thoroughly good examination. Addresses upon the imDortance of Sunday-school work were delivered by the Rev. Canon Wynne Edwards, the Rev. E..Smart, and the Rev. T. W. Vaughan, secretary of the union. An excellent musical pro- gramme was gone through. In the evening a full choral service in Welsh was held in St. Mary's Church, the preacher being the Rev. W. Morgan, St. Asaph. At the quarterly meeting of the Chester Town Council, on Wednesday, August 8, the conditions of the lease of the Roodee to be granted to the Grand Stand Committee came under con- sideration.—Alderman T. Q. Roberts moved an amendment on the printed conditions, to the effect that the Cheterrces should be continued for four days at each May meeting. Mr. Ellisseconded the amendment. After a. long and excited discussion, it was stated that the amendment would be a restriction upon the lease, the dausesas printed leaving the matter open. The motion was therefore withdrawn.—It was agreed that booths on the race- course-should close at seven o'clock each evening.—Mr. J. P. Cartwright moved that the yearly rent for the fieodee should be :£500, and not 9250 as previously agreed.—Alderman R. Frost moved that the subject be referred to the next council, with a view of rescinding last year's vote. This amendment was carried 'by fourteen to seven.—It was resolved that the Council memo- rialize the Privy Council to make Owens College into a nniver- ■sity. The Chester magistrates have recently investigated a charge against Frederick Huxley, described as a solicitoiyof 23, Nelson- street, Manchester, of having used threatening language to- wards his aunt, Mrs. Frances Jane Huxley, widow of the late Mr. Joseph Huxley, a gentleman who carried on a large whole- -sale business in Chester, and who held also a high position in the city. By the will of the late Mr. Joseph Huxley the de- t endaatwae appointed a co-trustee, with the widow, of the estate, and soon after the administration the defendant's conduct was made the subject of some criminal proceedings, which were subsequently abandoned, the estate being thrown into Chancery. Since that period defendant had systematically annoyed :his aunt, arid had threatened that if she exposed him he knew those who would take htr life away. Defendant denied the ^use of airrthreatening language, but the magistrates ordered him to be bound over in L100, and to find two sureties in £50 each, to keep the peace for six months. The defeefiant was removed in custody, the sureties not being forthcoming. A Masonic Lodge has been opened at Khyl. An especial meeting of the Provincial Grand Lodge of North Wales and Shropshire was held at the Town-hall, on August 3, at which brethren from all the lodges in the province were present to "witness and take part in the ceremony of 'consecrating the Caradoc Lodge," No. 1,674. The Grand Lodge was opened by the PBOV G. Master, Sir Watkin W. Wynn, ANA then the lodge was consecrated by Bro. W. H. Spaull, Prov. Grand Secre- tary. Afterwards the Prov. G. Master requested Bro. George Owen, P.G.S.W., to take the chair and install the 'Master Designate, Bro. J. B- Salmon, P.G.J.W: This ceremony over, the Provincial Grand Master, attended by the officers of the province and about 150 brethren, formed in procession and proceeded to St. Thomas's Church, where a large congregation had assembled. A short choral-service took place, and-the sermon was preached by Brother the Ven. Archdeacon Morgan, M. A. The offertory was, by command of the Provincial Grand'Master, in aid of the North Wales and Shropshire Masonic Charitable Association and the Rhyl Ragged Schools and Women's Convalescent Horn?. After service the procession re- formed and proceeded to the Town-hall, where.a banquet was served. • On Tuesday afternoon, August 7, a private meeting of the •clergy arid laity of Shrewsbury m s held at the residence of the Rev J. Colley, vicar of St. Julian's, to hear an address by the Rev. G. Collins protesting against the practice of vivisection. 'The Rev. G. Collins, in the course of his address, called atten- tion to the report of the Royal Commission upon the subject, -which, foe. said, he had read with the very deepest interest. The -more he went into the evidence there given the more satisfied lie was that vivisection was utterly wrong — scientifically, morally, and scripturally. The practice was a new one in this .country, for the older medical men had done without it, and yet-some of these men had attained to the very highest rank in their profession. That showed, he thought, beyond all doubt, that vivisection was not necessary. Cruelty, he contended, was a sin, and should not be legalised, yet twenty-three licences had ^been issued to persons permitting vivisection, and thirteen of them were fomemonstration purposes before medical students. The reverend gentleman exhibited an engraving of an apparatus ■which lias been-advertised for cooking a live rabbit or any other animal, and at the same time witnessing the effect of heat upon it- He also reftd what he described as a most horrible list of tlse operations which are performed, from the Blue-book. Scien- tifically, the eXPcPnY ,s resulted in little or no benefit, for the results arrived at were contradictory. Vivi- section was being lE ttoduced even mto ladies schools in Lon- don, and also into fc.ie hospitals. What was toe difference, he askedL between the poor man who worked a horse or a donkey when it waeln-an unfit state in order to help to his starving family and the man whe still more cruelly llltrettert an animal in tofb^pe that he might possibly discover something to alle- disease brougkt onbynmseir; W^ it right-to tor- ture the weak for the1 tenefit of the strong.. He hoped all present would do what ihey could to stop ,*uch horrible races bv petitioning Parliament, and supporting the society oFwhicIi he wafctiw local-co-responding secretary for this dis* trict.

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