Symud i'r prif gynnwys
Cuddio Rhestr Erthyglau

27 erthygl ar y dudalen hon

rUE CONTEST AT OLDHAM.

THE RHONDDA DIVISION.

SIR HUSSEY VIVIAN'S CANDIDATURE.

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"A DIARY OF THE OLADSTONE…

DID MR. GLADSTONE OPPOSE THE…

THE AF L< ALLTS OF RICHARD…

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THE MEMBER FOR PEMBROKESHIRE…

MONMOUTHSHIRE ELECTIONS.

TI-IE IRISH LAND LEAGUE.

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CURE FOR HYDROPHOBIA.

FUNERAL OF MR. EDWARD BATH,…

FUNERAL OF MR. JOHN EVANS,…

THE "WHITE SLAVE" AT THE CARDIFF…

_.__---..---------ECCLESIASTICAL…

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SPIRIT OF THE WELSH PRESS.

- DEATH OF THE KEY. DAVID…

THE PONTYPRIDD DOG AND POULTRY…

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CURRENT AGRICULTURAL TOPICS.

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GARDENING NOTES.

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MR. B. FRANCIS WILLIAMS AT…

Newyddion
Dyfynnu
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i" issntlemen present would act with the same p°urtesy and good temper which he himself hoped t# Jo maintain throughout the fight. (.Hear, hear.) 11". e proceeded to say that the Liberal party went °l kf° P°wer *n 1880, and he had endeavoured to put ft t^lem his view of the way they had used ^eir power. They would remember that a few st ninths ago they suddenly abdicated their L jtower, although they had a great majority 0" theit back. They no doubt hoped that j* the other party got into power for a few ri eeks the country would forget what had taken f'ace before. The Liberal party was now again before the country, and they were pursuing the I :tne tactics as they had done before. They were b airing large promises. They were promising t4at people should have three acres and a cow. {"No, nof") A gentleman said "No." He thought 1 jjfot was because the cow had gone now. '■Laughter and cheers.) But, seriously, that Promise was nothing but a bribe to the agricul- tural districts. It was the experience of a great j "'any people that they could not make land pay 1 ""ore than 2 per cent. But he heard that a little j^ore light had been thrown upon the subject of *te, because Mr. Chamberlain. (Loud cheers and Winter hisses.) He was glad to see that they Peered Mr. Chamberlain, for a great number Of Us unemployed people at Birmingham did 40t cheer him. But Mr. Chamberlain had bought 10TAe land and let it out in small allotments, and 18 the result of Mr. Chamberlain's experience he he could not make it pay more than 1 per cent. *hey could not borrow money at less than 3 or 4 tef cent.; and were the electors of the country gOing to pay 2 or 2k per cent. more on their rates keep up that bribe to the agricultural popula- ti.on? Passing on to touch upon the proposal for free education, the speaker said it would be an Excellent thing if it could be obtained. But educa- tion, like everything else, had to be paid for. The Proposal was that all the expense should be paid Gilt of the rates, and, in doing that, they would 'hut up all the Voluntary Schools. Persons who j|ad no children would have to pay for those who jjad. That might not be a great injustice, bit the scheme would work in a much more Unfair manner than that. The poorer the person as the sooner he would take his children from School, and those who were better off would keep ;heir children in school longer. The person, there- iore, who was able to keep his child in school longest would get the most benefit, and it would :!ome out of the pocket of the poor people. The great hardship was that persons were deprived of the services of their children at a time when they Would be a help in maintaining the family, and if Iome scheme could be devised whereby this could ■Je altered he should be very happy to support it. These were the chief things in the Radical pro-1 jtamme, and the speaker then directed the atten- i :'on of the audience to the Conservative programme. They did not wish to stand still. that was not his idea of Conservatism lt all. There were many reforms which ere urgently needed, and which must come. ^irst of all he was as much in favour as anyone ^uld be of legislation which would simplify the Tansfer of land. The greater the number of land- )"'ner8 in the country the better, and he thought 1 great deal could be done to make land more ^sily transferable than it was at present. It never lJuld be made as easy as the transfer of a pound If sugar over the counter, but if they had compul- lory registration of title, which they would have If the Conservatives came into office, that would go long way. But if they made land as easily ransferable as it possibly could be they ould never get men to invest their savings '1 it so long as all the burdens of local taxation el'e heaped upon it as the Radicals proposed. :'1e was also in favour of a scheme for '^proving local government, and when this was "ccomplislied he hoped the bodies popularly lected would deal with the anomalies of local Nation—(hear, hear)—so that the men who in- vested their money in Consols or bought railway ^ares would not get off without paying. The '°cal bodies might also deal with such a question Is Sunday Closing. He himself was, and had been for some time past, a total abstainer, and he could ish that everybody else was the same. (Hear, ear.) He believed that half the pauperism—and j|e knew that half the crime—came from drink. couid wish that all were teetotalers like !*i*nself; but, at the same time, he did not ^lieve thej* could be made so by Act of -arliament. They could help on to that nd. but they could not compel men. He 'I(!\S not to say because he did not take beer that his ^ighbour who had a fancy for it and liked a glass 0<-igiit to be compelled not to. But he thought **here there was an overwhelming voice on the Dart of the electors of a district that Sunday Closing or Local Option should be tried for a year Ir two it should be allowed. At the same time flir compensa'ion should be given to persons "hose means of a livelihood had been taken away. Kvvy yn leicio chwareu teg i bawb." (Cheers.) wanted to see fair play to all. (Hear, ^ear.) He was also strongly in favour f a closer bond of union being estab- lished between this country and our great Zolonies, and hoped that the day would soon tne when they would see that greater Britain Which would be foremost in all civilisation and in 1111 arts and sciences. (Cheers.) He protested 4gainst the action of the Radicals in Boycotting tile Royal Commission on Trade, and said he had 110 fear for Free Trade. He believed the time must when they would see Free Trade in every Part of the world. In conclusion, the speaker lJudecl to Disestablishment, and said it would be J bad day, not only to the Church, but to Noncon- •°i"mist. bodies as well, when that proposal was arriod into effect. (Cheers.) The CHAIRMAN, at the close of Mr. Williams's id dress, thanked the audience for their attentive lr,d patient hearing. When, however, the occu- pants of the platform had left, some three or four teachers and a few others mounted it, and, •^andishing their umbrellas before an excited and Bering lot who remained behind, proposed resolu- tions of confidence in the Grand Old Man and the Radical candidate for the division, and these wert jeclared carried.