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OUR NEW SERIAL.

THE PENTRE MUUDEll CASE.

FALL OF A CLIFF.

HOUSING IN SOUTH x WALES.

Newyddion
Dyfynnu
Rhannu

HOUSING IN SOUTH x WALES. IMPORTANT CONFERENCE AT MERTHYR. As an outcome of the articles on the ques- tion which recently appeared in the "Wes- tern Mail," a conference of representatives of Trades Unions, trades councils, co-operative societies, and other lahour organisations in South Wales and Monmouthshire was held on Saturday afternoon in the Town-hall, Merthyr, for the purpose of considering the housing problem. The conference was called jointly by Mr. David Davies, secretary of the Merthyr Trades Council, and Alderman Fred Knee. secretary of the Workmen's National Housing Council. There were about 280 delegates present from all parts of the area intended to be covered by the conven- tion, on the platform being several ladies. Mr. J. Keir Hardie, M.P., presided. The Chairman said the importance of the question could scarcely be over-estimated. There were three essentials to a well-condi- tioned hfe-a good wife. a good house, and good wages. (Hear, hear.) There was a diiference of opinion as to whether or not overcrowding was on the increase. The recent census appeared to indicate that the number of people per room was not so high as it was ten years ago. Probably that was so, but whilst the number of rooms might have increased, the size of the rooms had very much decreased. He was one of those who held that from every point of view- moral, physical, and sanitary—it was better to have two or three large, well-lighted, well- ventilated rooms than four or five rabbit hutches separated by partitions. (Hear, hear.) With the increase of population and the increase in the rental value of land in and near la.rge towns the question tended to heoome mote and more acnt, and it was becoming more and more difficult for the private speculator to build houses at a rental which the least well-paid portion of the work- ing classes could afford. What seemed to be assumed was, where that state of affairs existed—where they had a class of low-paid workmen unable to pay the rents charged by owners of slum property-the council of a town or district, as the case might be, should build houses for these very poor. He objected to that. He held that it was beginning at the wrong end. If houses were to be built by councils, :18 they were, in ever-increasing num- bers, he submitted that the class to be catered for was the well-to-do and well-paid working claw. Relieve the pressure at the top, and every class would take a st-ep upwards. (Hear, hear). Mr. Aifrcd Onions, Tredegar, treasurer of the South Wales Miners' Federation, moved the first resolution, which was as follos:- Th.at this meeting of representatives from Trades Unions, trades councils, co-operative societies, and other Labour organisations in South Wales and Monmouthshire, desires to place on record its emphatic protest against the bad housing conditions prevail- ing generally in the industrial districts. with the waste of human life, the spread of disease, and the moral degradation involved there-by. and pledges itself to use every e-ideiavour to secure for every man, woman, and ohild decent and healthy habitation. The question they had come there to dis- cuss, said Mr. Onions, was one of the highest importance. He never went into any mining centre or mining village but what he heard complaints of scarcity of houses. This scarcity in mining centres was taken advantage of by private owners to raise rents unduly. ("Shame.") He had heard some bitter com- plaints of this, and some very strong lan- guage. There were hundreds of houses in the mining districts with only one room downstairs, and in this room the miner had to ta.ke his bath. This sort of thing tended to destroy all sense of decency in the minds of the people. Mr. Robert Williams, F.R.I.B.A. (London), in supporting, said that considering the mighty fortunes that had been made in Wales it was shameful that so many hovels existed. Citing a number of figures, he pointed out particularly that the percentage of infantile mortality last week in Merthyr was 307 per 1.000-:1 much larger percentage even than in London. Infantile mortality was a test of the healthiness or unhealthiness of a district. Coming down to Merthyr he had been read- ing the "Western Mail." The "Western Mail made a good point that there should be a planning beforehand of towns and vil- lages. He had advocated this for years. One of the "Worst examples of a new town, he thought, was Barry. Councillor Evan Thomas (Hhymney) moved the next resolution :— That steps be taken to have local com- mittees formed to urge upon the local authority in each district the necessity and urgency for the fullest use of the powers at present vested in them, not only for the abatement of nuisances and the destruction of insanitary property, but also for the crection of comfortable homes for all the people who are to-day without, and, further, that representations be made to the mem- bers of Parliament for South Wales and Monmouthshire, and also to his Majesty's Government, that more extensive powers should be granted to local authorities for these purposes.. Mr. Coulton (Clydach Vale) proposed the addition to the resolution of the following words, and, further, that these reforms be made test questions at all local and Parlia- mentary elections." The rider of Mr. Coulton was accepted, and the resolution as amended was unanimon.sly passed

IIUSH DEVOLUTION PLANS.

AMERICAN RAILWAY SMASH.

CHILDREN'S COUGH'S.

MARRIAGE COMPLICATIONS. .

~~"I FOREMAN BEATEN.!

A SCENE IN COURT.

SAILORS WHO CANNOT SWIM'

TO AVOID MORGANEERING.

-FIGHT WITH A BURGLAR.

BIRMINGHAM'S WELSH WATER.

PICTURE PUZZLE i SOLUTIONS.…

INHERITANCE FRAUDS.

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