Cuddio Rhestr Erthyglau

23 erthygl ar y dudalen hon

[No title]

THE WELSH PEDESTRIAN.

RECOLLECTIONS AND ANECDOTES…

Newyddion
Dyfynnu
Rhannu

RECOLLECTIONS AND ANECDOTES OF IOLO MORGANWG, THE BARD OF GLAMORGAN. (By Elijah Waring. I2mo, pp.224. London, Chas.Gi)p)n,&c.) It is, we believe, about forty years since Mr. Waring settle Swansea-II young man, and a native of Hampshire. HIs t.st. I for the history of race, as well as his excfcl>ent education, com > with his ardent and sanguine temperament, soon tnripe t to cherish a deep interest in the antiq«i"es and h.era.u.e of the Kymry. He is a descendant of the Earl de Warren whose name is found among the" Barons Hold," who compi. English tyrant to sign Magna Ghana and the family in duo time becoming amalgamated witii the Saxons of Hants, mat tained for generations a high respec'^bility in that part o e kingdom. He had u0t long been settled in Glamorgans lire, before he became a diligent s'uJent of Welsh llis'.oty an general lore, aod endeavoured to make such knowledge av.ii a e to English readers, by establishing the Cambrian IV] iscellany. Of that excellent periodical he was priocipal editor, and cer tainly principal contributor. At no small cost of labour, and, we apprehend, at some coniiderable loss of money, it was kepi in existence, tilt ^|| hopes of a circulation tliut would e-tn pay the printer, perished. Mr. Waring resided Hlter^aids for many years at Neath, with a heait and a buu>e open for every scholar and good nno. He took a lung antl active share ia ilie battles of parliamentary reform, and of civil and religious liberty. Some of the most stirring "leaders" on the former question thtlt appeared in the Cambrian newspaper, were writien by him; as also several articles in favour of the equal rights 01 nonconformist' of all grades, with members ot the established communion. No man has better understood, and no man more eloquently, or more disinterestedly, enplamed and advocated the great and gloricus principles of mutual religious tolerauoo. Arr.nDT; the notabilities" 10 whom Mr. Wa line's excel lent qualities introduced, him whom he cheerfully entertaioed at Plas-y-lelm, !,nd with j whom he became cordially unittd, was Edward Williams, or 1 Iolo Morganwg, the ancient Baid of Glamorgan. He never came near Neath, during many ye*r«, without making the I author s house his home, where good tea, and bread and butter, regaled him, aod where, from the ample larder of his own mtnd, he refreshed and exhilaia'ed the family and such visitors as may have been pre»ent. When I..lo died, Mr. Waring wrote to the Cumbrian newspaper, a senes oi letters, under the title of Kecollections of 1010 Moraanwg," He was, at the time, importuned 10 enlarge th-se letters into a book, by many frteoda in England and Wale», and by nobody with more earnest- ness than the late Robert Southey. That veteran in letteis had known old loto, in London, aod in Glamorganshire, and had always held him in the highest esteem while his letter;) in this volume prove that he regarded his memory with the highest vene- ration. Our author would gladly have addressed himself to this Cask, but for the hope 00 his part, and the expressed purpose on the part of Mr. Taliesin Williams, son of the old Bard, and himself a Bard of no mean celebrity-to prepare and publish memoirs of his father. Years after years elapsed, aod still nothing was done, when, at last, the period of the son's removal from this earthly scene arrived, and his remains were consigned to the same grave with those of his celebrated father. Mr. Waring now, urged again by his friends, put his pen to the work and here we have the result before us. To review this book, is a monstrously difficult task—uoningted praise is like too much honey, it cloys and sickens. Still, what can a reviewer do.when there is no fault to had. True to the habit of our fraternity, ever since the time of Zotlus, down to Pope, and thence to this mo- ment, we have read this book with lynx-eyed attention, ar. can neither "hint a fault," nor "hesitate dislike." We cannot make blemishes in the book, aod as we find none in H, "e ca report none. Of its atirac.ions and excellencies, wa could «• "from morn to noon, from noon 10 dewy eve. with a capital portrait of the Bard, seated, aod the law." After this protrait is another of bun as a re es wallel on (boulder, and staft' io hand. The book consists o se^ chapters, covering 133 pages, and 90 pages in smatterprtnt. ine style is Elizah WaFing's. What need is there to add t>a 1 s that of the true aod varied scholar, clear as the untroub e< a e, reflecting the beams from its bosom. The spirit is a so > Waring'g—kindly, candid, and tolerant, pure as a serap aD' penile as a lamb." The contents are so varied, and yet o sue commanding interest, and referring to so many subjects. 01 literary, social, and political importance, that their classification even is quite beyond the range of our space for such purposes, this week. We must, in two weeks or so, return to it again meanwhile, we most cordially recommend it to every Welshman, every scholar, every gentleman, aid every Christian, be be a Welshman er not—" Yn saw Duw a phob Daion)."

THE WESLEYAN CONFERENCE.

------+-BARWJFAD.—SMCFHAS.…

RUPTURE IN THE WESLEYAN SOCIETY.

----+---MAGISTRATES' OFFICE,…

NEWPORT BOROUGH POLICE.—Monday.

NEWPORT TIDE TABLE. * I

SOUTH WALES RAILWAY TIME.

TAFF VALE RAILWAY TIME.

\GREAT WESTERN RAILWAY TIME.

■II--,I---I---> ---------BRISTOL…

----I LONDON WARKET59 &c.…

AGENTS FOR THE MONMOUTHSHIRE…

t LET ME NOT DIE IN SPRING.

BESSIE GRAY.

THE FEUILLETON OF THE MERLIN.…

GENERAL NEWS.I .

THE CHOLEA.—IMPORTANT WARNINGS.

t THE LATE EXECUTION AT YORK.…

NEWPORT FREEHOLD LAND SOCIETY.

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