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---------HINTS FOR ALLOTMENT…

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HINTS FOR ALLOTMENT HOLDERS. By SPADE-WORKER. SOWIN(I BROAD BEANS. 1\ is a favourite practice with many p^unlf:uerti to make a sowing of broad beans al this time of year, and, providing the plants pass through the winter safely, the re.itsits fully justify the kibour. The plants 'fivioiue well t'stabhsiicd by spring, and. at the n,min» of milder and warmer weather. th«*y .start to grow vigorously, thus the pod* are well sot. luefure the chief, and in the only, enemy <tt this veietable--thc-I blarfc aphis--piits im an appearance The broad bean is orw "f the hardiest of vege- table crops, and. even 111 heavy land, usu- ally survives neve re weather But Novem- ber-sowmg is chiefly valuable on light land, wiiHfe there is no danger of loss during the winter, ami where it is essential that the plant* sbiill t >*• well rooted before hot wc.ither s4-1s in during April and May It is usit.il to "ow hroad licans in a double row the seeds about 5111 apart-, and the line- of lh" row a Unit Hitt from each other. A small variety railed Beck's Green Gem is often chosen lor autumn sowing, but it is better to grow one of the fitter longpod HOOT CHOI' IN STOKE. Complaints' have reached Ole that various roots. in store. especially potatoes. onions, and shallots are keeping badly, many hav- ing been lost through tlccay Nothing iø more atitioying than to lose crops in this way after so much time and lahour have l.ell expended upon their cultivation It is difficult to understand why this should happen during the present season, for the autumn was generally warm and dry and favourable for lifting and storing. The chief ea"ses of loss among stored roots nre: (1) putting them away before they, have l^en pro|>erIy dried. (2) storing in too large a heap. Gty keeping them in too warm aDd "close" an atmosphere, and (4) failing to examine them periodically for the purpose of removing unsound specimens. It is. of course, most important that unsound roots Iw not stored among sound ones I find it is a far safer plan to store vegetable roots in Rmall quantities together than in consider- able bulk, for one can then look them over' frequently with convenience. Unless diseased jjpecimens are taken out others will be affected. TAKING CUTTINGS. At this time of year most hardy trees and shrubs can be increased by means of cut- tings, such, for example, as roses, currants, gooseberries, privet, ivy, and so on. Even apple trees can be raised in this way, though some varieties are more reliable thiui others It is generally found that a cuttting having a piece of the older branch attached (a "heel," as it is called), forms roots more readily than a cutting without » "heel." The accompanying illustration shows the matter clearly. After the cutting has been detached, as shown by the dotted line, the "heel" must be pared smoothly with a sharp knife. the cutting is then inserted as usual. It is advisable to put the cutting in at such a depth that half or two-thirds is beneath the soil. Cuttings may be inserted 111 the soil out of doors, or in pots and boxes of soil placed in a frame. MORE ABOUT POTATOES. With reference to the yields of potatoes grown by readers of this column and re- cently published, Mr E Heather writes: "As an experiment last spring we cut one large potato into seven pieces and planted them- the result from this one tuber has given a yield of 221b of excellent potatoes That is. of course, a remarkably good re- suit; much better than would have been obtained had the large potato been planted uncut It us perhaps just as well to point out that although it p*ys to cut larger potatoes into several pieces, it pays still better to plant medium sized whole tubers. If Mr Heather had been able to plant seven tubers of from 2 to 3oz each and had given ¡ them the same treatment, he would have obtained an even larger yield, if the results t of experiments are to be relied upon. I PIUZEWINNING HINTS Those who may wish to raise seedlings of various sorts and find that flower-pota are scarce, will be interested in the following hint from Mr Arthur Kirkbright (to whom a copy of "Garden Work for Every Day is awarded Save all eggshells and fill them with light {jotting mould, sowing the seed in due course Place the eggshells close together in a shallow box, scattering a little fibre between them When a seedling is ready to transplant, lift up the eggshell, break it gently, and plajit out It is often difficult to keep vegetable mar. rows after late autumn, because they com- mence to decay at one end, and when that happens the fruit is soon spoilt. The best way to use them is to make marrow jam. Here is a recipe from Mrs Lowe (to whom a prize of "Gardening Difficulties Solved" is awarded). Take one large vegetable marrow —after being peeled and cut up in con- venient lengths, weight about 5U>.—21b of apples, weighed after being peeled and cored These should be put in the oven with a little water, and cooked until they fall, using a Tittle bruised ginger and rind and juice of three lemons and about one pint of water The net weight would be alxmt 7llh. if about 4tb of sugar if added it makes it a very good jam that will set: PRIZE COMPETITION FOR ALLOT. MENT HOLDERS. Every week two prizes are offered for the best allotment hint or recipe The prizes consist of useful gardening books. All en- tries for this competition must be addressed "Spadeworker," care of Editor of this paper ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS Potato—Potatoes will keep well if pitted or clamped in the garden. Dig a circular trench one spit deep, and place the soil in- side the Qjrcle On this place 4in or 5in. of ashes, then a layer of straw. Then ar. range the potatoes on the straw. building np a cone-shaped "heap Cover the potatoes with a good layer of straw, and on this put 5in. or 6in. of soil, well beaten down with the spade A few wisps of straw must be allowed to come through at the top of the clamp for ventilation O. S. W.—Keep the shallots in a cool. airy, and dry room. yet where they are safe from frost. "Spadeworker" is open to give practical advice, free of charge, to readers of this paper. Hsplies will be sent by poet if a stamped addressed envelope is enclosed. Address your inquiries to "Spadeworker," care of Editor.

YSPYTTY YSTWYTH.

ABERFFRWD.

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