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[All RIGHTS ISSSBTIO^ NO; EOBB HENRY FRITH. iL Jivihor of The Mystery of Moor Farm" Ojt the Wings of the Wind," Through Flood, Through Fire *$c.t &e, .eo- CHAPTER XV. ■ —«-" OHS SUP N EAR Bit." SIR WALTER WATSON was very indignant, and can we wonder at it ? His pet locomotive-the one engine on which he had permitted his august name to appeat P-had been roaming about upon the railroad by itself, like a common ":pilot "sent before the Queen. Preposterous! But this runaway had done some service. Edward Watson had escaped, and by the prompt interven- tion of the signalman. He had also been indebttd to the young lady," as he called her, in the gignalman's hut; and what was more natural than that he should tell his friend, Lady Deane, at the Hall, the circumstances of the case. I He was a generous lad, and wanted to award the signalman and the young lady who had somehow got into the signal-box. He knew quite well that young women in the boxes were against regula- tion, and yet sho had been instrumental in saving his life. Had she not been ready at hand to work the levers the sigealraan could not have left his box, and the engine might never have been followed and Overtaken. No doubt he owed her much but how was he to pay his debt ? Sir William had already prohibited him from wandering about the shops," and many a run had been nipped in the bud, so to speak, in conse- quence of thAstern n-andate. Edward could not ride his ho shy his engine—until he had obtained his father's sanction. Tn his d'stro-s he tuixed to bis flidld Lady Deane for assistance. She han not long before returned from Tndia with a son and heir, and o-, e t,, were the rejoicings at the Hall wh, n it was announced that the "colonel's lady ha'! manasred matters so well as to present her husband, at last, wi-h a son. o her triumphant went young Watson v. i.h all the confidence of youth. Oh, Lady Deane, I'm in such a fix; it's a re- gular scape this time the governor's in a dreadful way." What have you been doing .isk-d his friend, (Smiling hs sv e took his hand, and retained him by the chair in which she w as seated. You are a very J'eckless toy, I'm :-¡Jrai,]," "No, indeed, 1 I,d.: one, I'm not. I only took out father's new ell.1JW by accident. I fell asi ep somehow, and i went away by it elf. I can't explain." "You fell asleep! To you mean j h:-1t you got upon the engine sleepy, or were permitted to remain there ? Well, this is how it was. Sandy rii I "Who r" exclaimed Ladv D-ane. n surpii-e. r "Sandy Sam. Don't yon know who he is?" in- quired Edward in astonishment. Lady'Deane replied that she had not the honour Of his ac uaintance. It's no great honour anyway," iepl cd the boy. "Sauely Sam is the fore-nan in the shops, and he let, me do as I like. IL put me on the Watson,' and "The Watson! What is that, ? I don't quite understand yo i, dear," Ea:d her adyship. "Why, the fnirine, of course," replied the lad. f My father has had it cancel after him, you see, and nobody but the governor had any business upon it. But Sandy Sam—well he doe n't care much for the governor—and let ne <o." "Docs your father know !hit inquired Lady liid li, r Xo. but. I shall tell him some day. Sam iso" a pM fellow, but he and the pater don't hit it off, and And so this nnn acted in dire t opposition to your father's ord. rj, permitted, ou to go upon an engine, and took no care to see that it was secure ? I on't much like Mr. S ndy Sam. I will speak to Sir Walter mys It." Oh, please, don't. Sam will get into a row, and 8i) shall I. Dear Lady De me, listen a moment. I feU asleep I can't tell how, b.-cause I had only a gla-s o" gii jp -V eer. "Who gave you the gingerbeer. Edward?-' 41 AVhy, old Sam, of course. There's plen!y at the sLall near the gate, arid then I must have gone to I sleep, and never woke till the engine was under way" You were very fortunate to be rescued so promptly Yes, wasn't I And that is what I came about. The signalman in the cutt'ng follow, d me on another engine, and actually saved my life." Wh t, and left his po..t ? "Yes; and here is tbe rations tlr'ng. A woman was in the signal-box, and all the work while he was away. v Perhaps she is his wife. At any rate she is very nice and prettv, and has a lovely child, just. like the o'eber you showed me the Othe- day." 'Vhat soldier, dear ? in pnred Lady Deane, I'stlesslv, for these detads did not much interest her, and she "as thinking of her husband far away in Tndia, fighting perhaps own then, or lying dead upon the field of battle. What soldier ? Whv, the soldier in your dbum-the colonel- your husband, i.,n't he. ? My husband, boy! Do you know what you are Saying r" Of course I do," replied the unsuspecting and ingenuous youth. This girl or woman—very pretty she is -has a baby like him, and she saved my life. Now, I want you to tell me what I ought to do about her. I have money —— "Like my husl and," murmured Lady Deane, without takir g any noti e of the boy. Quite im- possible," she added aloud. I have, indeed," continued Edward. I can give her money but! wish you would tell me. I ouppose, you like to see herP" Lady Deane smiled at the idea of her calling upon a signalman's wife arid daughter. Yet there was (Something curious about this woman who had sud- denly arrived fiom abroad, as Edward informed her, with a child bearing so striking a resemblance to the fIOlonel that even the lad had remarked it. Would it not be worth while to send for her. And then the remembrance of the shipwreck and her preser- vation came upon her, and the recollection of the < ftrange woman who nursed her in her illness pre. 'f!i! viyidlv before. 0 0 0 0

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