Symud i'r prif gynnwys
Cuddio Rhestr Erthyglau

7 erthygl ar y dudalen hon

LITERARY EXTRACTS. -

Newyddion
Dyfynnu
Rhannu

LITERARY EXTRACTS. BEAUTIFULLY SIMPLig.-Necessity, being the mother jf invention, is responsible for some strange ex- Sclients, as is exemplified by some shoopkeepers in e foreign and poorer quarters of London. Their themselves consist largely of foreigners, Including all nationalities, who cannot read English, f id a few who can read no language whatsoever, et the shopkeeper has no difficulty in informing them of the price of his wares; and he adopts a jjethod beautiful in its simplicity. Let us suppose a Eocer desires to make them understand the price of 8 tea. On the top of a little tray of loose tea he will have an ounce packet made up, and a penny, j which we assume is the price, tied to it with a piece of cotton. It is quite clear, then, that the price of I 3D ounce of tea is a penny. Experience soon teaches the customers the size of aa ounce packet, that I quantity of this commodity being the standard, as it Is rare that anybody in such neighbourhoods buys a greater quantity at a time. There is also no difficulty ps to quality, for there is usHally only one kind sold -the cheapest. A window of a provision and Seneral dealer's shop presents a curious appearance, 'here can be seen a packet of half a pound of sugar frith three farthings on it, a bundle of wood with a halfpenny, a loaf of bread with two-pence, a half- pint measure of milk with three farthings attached, SC. Nearly all the things sold in the shop are dis- played in the window, from pins to putty, from peas 10 potted salmon, and with their curious substitutes for price tickets for a unique, if unpicturesque, con- glomeration. To show that there is a reduction on a quantity, a coin is placed on one article and near it jMre several of the same articles tied together, and their total price in coin shown. The reduction is thus made apparent to the dullest. The expedient is found to be quite sufficient for their purposes. They dgn!t find it necessary to post up such notices as Paqr Trust is Dead Bad Pay Killed Him," for the uncertainties of the credit system are unknown jthem, but they would be equal to the Occasion bhould it arise, and would probably be ingeniOUST eijough to express these East-end little trading mottoes in a language of a universality equal to that expmtbd-though not realised-of Volapiik, with the additional advantage of greater clearness n tnd simplicity.—'Cdsselts Saturday Journal. JUNE.—June is as a (fairyland in the kingdom of the year-so gorgeous its pageants, so delicate each Retail, so gentle every word that is borne on the wavering breezes; and, the longest day, if it chance to fall in fair weather, is the treasure-house—all Mature is so passing fair then. See the clouds as they sail in the azure sky—billowy masses of white §nd grey, such as are seldom seen earlier or later in the year. They were there in April and May, but the background of deeps of blue where the dew is ftored was not so pure, and they showed to less advantage. June is the month to paint those vaporous squadrons that a prose poet has called "the fleets of Heaven." How apt the metaphor! In March, when boisterous winds drove them along and tore their canvas into shreds, how they drifted and tossed like ships in a gale How they hurried forward in the scant time of February flays, scudding along like the ships of iEneas, when the wind drove them on to the hospitable shores of Carthage. Now they glide at leisure, float in proud state, or ride at anchor for the days are long in June, and glad, and calm. Even clouds are cheerful now. All the sorrowful imagery of clouds were false if these were typical. The very shadows they cast are full of light they seem to smile as they let fall a shade that only Colours the hills more richly as they pass, and dyes the green of field and wood to bright er hue. June clouds are not the storm-signals we borrow to show forth those phases of human sadness that clouds, in poetic language, betoken; they are scarcely less radiant than June flowers. June flowers bloom everywhere. In the grass there are still some spring blossoms; daisies grow taller, trying to get abreast with luxuriant grasses buttercups are golden in the meadow, a few violets linger in the later copses; herb-robert is pink in the hedge. The tender anemones and sturdy daffodils, that alike seem able to bear early cold and storm, are gone. but still from the woodlands the fragrance of fading blue- bells is wafted and the ugly scent of white garlic that lies like winter snow in the dappled light and hade that is so pleasant in the woods while yet the icreen of leaves in June is faulty. Spring and lummer meet, their flowers intermingle. Lone sDrays of Solomon's Seal, one of the loveliest of our wild ">wers, put forth their white bells in the woods. Ihere too the purple orchis blows, and tiny flowers If hay-scented woodruff, wild strawberry, and lilies I of the valley. There is no dearth of flowers in the woods as yet. Later, when the trees have put on their full verdure, and the leaves are broad and itrong, darkness falls in the long aisles where branching columns and arches support an impene- trable roof; and in the daik few plants bloOlll.- The Quiver. KILLALoi;The Bishop of the diocese gives the following description of his cathedral city liillaloe is a. little town on a great river. A few inns and public- houses stand by the river-side, and up from the river's bank climb two or three steep, straggling, and muddy streets. These form the town. There is a little bustle in it generally, on account of the passing | barges depositing their freights on the little quays ind there is much conversation and frequent laughter among the men who are always standing at the corners of the streets, always smoking clay pipes, always ready to greet a stranger with a kindly word and pleasant smile. The country around is not exactly mountainous, but very hilly. The hills rise to about a thousand feet, with pasture and tillage creeping as far as they can up their sides, leaving the rounded tops rugged with slaty •rags, softened by heather and gorse. Between the Qills flows the river Shannon, about as wide here as the Rhine at Coblentz. A mile higher up it has amerged from a vast lake 25 miles long, varying in breadth from eight to three. After its rest in this lake, beautiful with wooded banks and jutting pro- montories, studded here and there with islands, where j old towers and ruined castles stand amidst trees and brushwood after this rest the river comes forth Keep, swift, and flowing, dark in colour, like the eves of Irish girls, dark with a blue that is almost black. It pours itself between the steep town of Ivillaloe and the steeply rising hills on the opposite side. An old bridge with many arches; lomo wide and some narrow, steps over the her here-ci bridge quaint and picturesque, but strong and massive, which has for centuries breasted the swellings of the mighty river. After passing the I ghadows of the_bridge, the river breaks into foaming -w-i 0 0

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LITERARY EXTRACTS. -

READINGS FOR THE YOUNG. .