Cuddio Rhestr Erthyglau

14 erthygl ar y dudalen hon

FASHIONABLES, LITERATURE,…

OX THE COMMERCE Of FRANCE…

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OX THE COMMERCE Of FRANCE 'In' THE YEARS 1 s29 aii rl 1S32. dI (From the Journal tie Commerce.) We h ave already spoken of the general review offareign trade in 1832. Wc have pointed out all the improvements, introduced by the administration of the Customs in this new publication, naming, besides the changes which might he carried into effect, to render these offices more cow j>h:ti*, easier of access, and consequently more useful for information. We have also niven the principal iesult-i which appear, and the conclusions which miicht he drawn from them. But as may be imagined we have not ex. plained all. touching these very interesting tables, and that we more than once, have to return to the sub- ject. INr, do so now for the purpose of setting forth a fact which has been disputed for some months, when we had not official Jigiires to produce, tianiely -tbat the actual prosperity was only in comparison to the distress of 1S30 and 1S31, and that the amount of our consumption in lti32 scarcely equalled that of 1829, Let us take first the imports of the two years and com- pare them I Articles necessary to in- 1829 1332 dustry 5507.907,1'Of. 280,988 356'. Articles of > in a raw state J t0.2S3,42Sf- 19fi,U7.755f, consumpt. j manufactured 35,162,581f. 27,987,377f. T-Hal 483,353, lJ9f. 505,093,4881'. Looking generally at the figures, the balance would ap- pear in favoui of 1U3*2 j but if on one side we deduct fifty- six millions °f t'rain, excess of importation of J832 a3 compared with 1829, and on the other part tie millions for excess of imports of raw sugar in 1S32, compared with the re-exportation of refined (on account of the high bounties), it will be found, these circumstances being duly considered that dw Imports of IB32 have I)ceii less by 10 iniltions of francs. This diminution is thus divided:—Twenty-seven millions i" articles in a raw state for the manufactories six millions in articles 01 consumption in a natural state, and seven in those for consumption after manufacture. Among the principal raw materials for manufacture in which the year 1832 is deficient, diamonds and precious stones must be first noticed, which in Id2) amounted to twelve million". anJ in 1S32 was RU entire blank. Next imports of skins, reduced to five a six millions. Of raw silk, in 1829, 45 millions, and 38 millions in 1S32; and of wool. which has decreased from 9 200,000f. fo 7,800,009i. Among the objects of consumption unconnected with industry, it is deplorable to notice the enormous falling oil ;n t\.n —,>f 1, «»<■>t • 1S29 1632 Heads. Heads. Rams, Ewes Sheep, and Lambs.. 190,000 96 000 Oxen. 14.131 6,599 26,825 8610 Calves 16,265.. 9,914 Thus the importation of oxen and alieep are reduced more than a half. Thus the import of cows (the meat used by the poor) has diminished inure than two-thirds I Will M. de St. Cricq dare again to say from the Tribune that the imports of cattle have not decreased? Now let ns take up the export side of the qucstion for the two periods under consideration EX PORTS lo29. 1832. Natural proùuce 15S.269.519f U6,622.345f Manufacture 350.978,1 lOf 360,792,629f Total 50.1,217,629f 507.,Ill,97 11, The year 1832 would appear here to have the advantage; hut deducting "ten millions for the overplus of counties (primes ) which were paid in 1So2 on the exportation of refined sugars, the preponderance will rather lean towards 1829. The totals of other articles are similarly affected. Piece "oods and felts which arc most prominent articles, amount in each year to about two hundred and thirty millions. A mong the exports fallen off brandy must be noticed in 1S29, above 32 millions of litres were exported, and in 1832, 23,7h7 ,OOO. only-a reduction of nearly a third. We wish that so important a fact may induce M. Thiers no longer to resist the reclamations from the South, and at length to conclude a commercial treaty which would open the ports of England to the natural produce of France. A third document serves to compare the relative pros- perity at the two periods, namely, the navigation returns :— SHIPS ENTERED. 1829. 1832. No. ofl No.ofi Ships.j Tons. Ships Tons. Direct from French. 3,018 831,049 14,290 399,918 L their own J Foreign >ountry. "A 4,342 4o7,739 4,625 557,985 ° > /with their own Flags Othcr Flags 728 94,016 1.026: 156,658 Tc,tal 8.1 IS j 912,804 9 94i;i,114,586 SHIPS SAILED. lo29. 1832. N"* ofl So. ofl Ships, Tons. Ships, Tons. French 3,101 316,462 4,015 347 285 f For their} Foreign J own Conn- < 3,698 311,286 3,817 437 118 ttry } Other Flags 792 108 912 S19 424.5S6 Total 7,591 j 736 690 8,681 801,989 The increase in the number of ships and tonnage must be chiefly attributed to the corn trade in fact, on the one part the imports of wheat by sea in li-32, exceeded those of 1529 by at < ast two millions of hectolitres, and on the other hand, a s up carrying the average quantity of from 200 to 250 tons, or 000 to 3,700 hectolitres, it follows that the transport of tl-is ai ticle alone must have occupied 600 ships at least. These navigation tables prove besides, that in spite of the increase ot t e total of shipping and tonnage, our marine has continued to decrease in proportion to the foreign vessels, which we have already proved in an article pub- lished some months ago. After all this detail what becomes of all the phantas- magoria of prosperity, with which the country has been deluded? The fact 'fat after the kingdom had for two years suffered many privations, the happiness of a revival of consumption was the more felt; and it is also true that capitalists, alter aving kept their money long inactive, recovering *'°™ tlle,r panic, were impatient to make up for lost time and niteiest, and entered into speculation with eagerness, ca!'s.in? that stir in money, paper, and mer- chandize, which lias gone on with increased briskness up to the present period, '['bis caused much activity in our i. commercial department, hut which relating so much to spcclllaljon, (lid not so tnllch apply to consumption. Finally, \\c do not wish our motives to be mistaken. We have not brought forward these facts in any un- friendly feeling to the existing authorities; but we have endeavoured to make them comprehend that that prosperity of which i £ makes so much noise is not so astonishing an affair as they would make it appear; that. there is some- thing factitious and casual in the rffair, and if affairs looked uncertain and threatening iu 1829, there would have been great imprudence in holding back, under the last admiuisjj tration, now that we are returned to about the same rate of consumption as at that period. What we require is, that the experience of past years be not lost, and that the errors committed against the interests of our growers and manu- facturers should be acknowledged, and, in fine, that there should be a reform in our financial system. The same causes which brought on the crisis of 1830 still exist, and though not perceptible, are still in action in our social system. Shall another crisis be waited for before steps are taken to set them aside?

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-----------------F ~ WEANINGS-…

- UNIVERSITY JJS TELLlUKiWE,'…

" i^ |l[ THE MARKETS.J !

U .DUiCU VEH Y OF A HOMICIDE.…

HORRIBLE MURDER. ..

SHIPWRECKS. -0.

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SCKi fi'UIiE ILLUSTRATIONS.…

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-i' ----FBOM FRIDAY S LONDON…

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