Symud i'r prif gynnwys
Cuddio Rhestr Erthyglau

15 erthygl ar y dudalen hon

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Newyddion
Dyfynnu
Rhannu

Th e German Papers speak of Greece as The erati"g' day by day, into deeper beggary. l0t^natives indignant at the preference shown -Germans—the Germans disgusted with 1h knavery of the natives, and, among t. "1 a 1, the poor boy, whom the wisdom of the C|Ur°Pean Cabinets sent to govern this race of •Is*8'0 ^an(''lti>'s at bis wits' end. Yet, what th have been expected from sending him first a mere boy to meet the difficulties of fresh from the crudities of a Civil War, next, K crowd of Bavarians, notoriously ^onne^8 de nuit'" of all Germany,—itself the prejudiced, purblind, and conceited of all tOns. notwithstanding its eternal boast of :Qdlill philosophy, metaphysical Government, Mystical religion-the land of the School- e **er» and where nothing b«t the Schoolmaster —the whole amounting to a mass of con- ^rb"1' Greeks must be ten times the Hr,ans they are, not to despise. iMie result natural. The Government defied in 4* COrners of the country—Robbery goil'g with I Ibuch spirit as ever, where there is anything Of ||'° —Mainotes sweeping away the beeves fcUu'8 ^°'on'sts from the valleys—Klepts, with *nd dagger, startling the Bavarian bat- r IOns out of their first sleep-a general dissolu- 10n" 1 0j. tjthaw of the political courage of the men C'^ar a,l(^ ^,e ,neersc''aum, until Sultan jje ,lri°ud, cossacked as he is, begins to think f,X his claws on the Greek soil a^ain, 'eid his Boy King and his heavy barbarians, L te 80 many of their compatriot broom-girl)., to the laud of their ancestors. Of course, bas her share in all this combustion, Uj etween tl»e bribery, which no Greek since *bl Themistocles or before, was ever e ^0 withstand, and her intrigues with the Pulaee and the priesthood, she may raise a at what time and place she will. Her i» now raised against General Church, the British subject who has acquired any in- j: 'e'lce tn the sountry, and whp_, being an intel- •hn Personage, as well as a gallant soldier, An" pec,,liarly displeasing to the Autocrat. ab,0t'i€r loucb of the imperial finger is discover- lr> the appointment of Colocotroni, an old ari«»n of the oldest stamp, to the Council of beti ^,ate tl,«s more of such aopoiutments the r 'or the cause of confusion and the Czar. It 1 att Wokild, we presume, be hopeless to call the I enti(ill of Uø Cabinet to the dilapidated con- 1 vTreece and its tottering Monarchy j he an enlightened Cabinet, Greece would a<stiv ^'S m°meut, a natural object of the most hj high-minded policy. Nothing can that arer to any man of common sense than fl)u he battle for European snprcmary must be Nu and speedily fought too, in the Mediter- ^'ie 7ru,t-q are already undone. That hl Ion 's as fully decided as if we saw Sultan ''4»it nou packillg up his piano, his Parisian there- 118 and his Russian cap, and moving Y, and all to his native Tartary. A few Anjj, of trHfficking and memorialising, of empty assa or,, ii), and the grimacing of the Orei the i 11 Office, may bolster up the Brother of ft*Ulier an<^ Moon, but his horoscope is drawn; ^re*t g^ars nor Venus will save him, and the Jr*,rs f.ear's 'n the ascendant. Within a few will be divested of all its dis- •tOtj ^'e Autocrat of all the Russias will allenge to the English Fleet to fight him for Constantinople. We say. and hope, the English fleet alone, for we know enough of the Continent and its alliances to feel assured that if we underiake the struggle in any other shape than as the leaders of the whole, we shall have only the old pleasure of wasting our millions on every intriguer from Calais to Constantinople, being deserted by every one of them in succession, and finally, after having paid for half-a-dozen years of defeats with English blood, trea ure, and fame, worth ten Continents, we shall have to try the experi- ment again of recovering our lost ground by our- selves. The only true obstacle to Russia would be neither an Embassy to the tardy Sovereignty of Prince Metternich, nor to the whiskered Guard-room of Frederick WTilliain, nor to the very slippery and smiling Court of the Citizen King. We must prepare a civiiized Government to take the place of furred and bearded barbarism —the horde of Viziers and Muftis, that have now degenerated into so many trembling old women. When his and their short day is done, the Government must be GREEK. It must be an expansion of the power which now holds the feeble sway of the Morea, but which, for such a purpose must be imbued with new wisdom,(Vi- gour, and vitality. If King Otho is not the man for this, we must find one who is. With the Fleet of England to protect and enlarge the rising state, English commerce to give the coun- try the substantial strength essential for the conflict, English minds and bodies to colonize and recruit the decaying and dishonoured popu- lation by the spirit of legitimate freedom and the courage of national defence, Greece, fostered by a truly British Government, would become fit to resume her ancient rank as the bulwark of tlie European world against the invasions of the Barbarians of the Desert and the Polar Circle. The Crown of v onstaulinnple should then be placed on the brow of the Greek Sovereign, thus the Throne of the Greek Empire would be restored and Russia left to glut her ambition as she might, in hunting down the Kalmucs and domineering over the sands of Babylon. One of our Contemporaries, the Welshman, terribly at a loss for mirth, tries to make it by our help out of the very dull affiir of the Municipal Elections. We selected the Mavor of Garratt as the true picture of the wisdom aid Radicalism of the 19th century, and left our reader to amuse himself with the living likeness of our Legislative Heeltaps, Slugs, and Prim- mers,' the pleasant fictions of our aTce writer a century ago. Our matter of fact friend, how- ever, seems to take this all for history, and de- claims with a gravity suited to himself, on the crimes of our forefathers. Now we distinctly said that we quoted a farce, and what is any farce in its own day at least, but an exaggera- tion—a burlesque-a caricature of something that exhibited and required the humour of the farce writer to turn into ridicule. We have no burlesque of Joe Miller, for people never waste their wit in attempting to ridicule tililt which is redicutons in itself. ,'e have no caricature of Grimaltli-we have no urlesque of Fox's History of the Revolution, unless perhaps it is Lord John Russell's; the plain fact is, that the Farceur, taking hold of the principal features of a Town Election, coloured, twisted, and metamorphosed them into the pleasant mockery that makes the food of a'l farce. Unluckily, what was farce to him is fact to us, and the illumination of this cen- tury of Penny Magazines, and universal States- manship has been employed in exhibiting, both in our writings and Common Halls, the Mugs the Heeltaps, and Primnierq, whom his in- vention once treated as too absurd even for comedy, and fit only for the broad exaggeration which sets the gallery in a roar. Shall we give our friend another, for fear he should fall into the awkward mistake of taking the history for a farce, as he took the farce for a history. We shall tell him that it has been exhibited within the last fortnight, Mr Leaky in the Chair, at the Prince William's Arms, in the Council of Barbers, assembled to debate the ,Sunday Shaving Act. Chairin,in.-I tells you if you keeps open you'll be fined. Mr Lloyd.—I wont shut up for nobody. Chairman Then keep open and be Lloyd.-l wont shut up, I'll see them all first; if they summonses me I'll stick the summons on the shutters and appeal to the people. I'll breed a revolution. (Cries of yon're drunk—sit down). I wont sit down; I'm a news vender, and sells the unstamped. Mr Pott.—You arc a liar. Lloyd.—I'd advise you Mr Pott to shut your pot up, or else I'll spoil your Mug for you, &c. &c. Now we have not a doubt that these deliberative Gentlemen regard themselves as perfectly fit to discuss the aflairs of State from pinnacle to foundation, and who can doubt but that they are politicians of the first witlt,r-to a man indig- nant atlhe g-uilt of tile last hundred Parliaments, bristling at the corrl\ pt iOIl of all possible courts, critical on the eloquence, labours, a d accom- plishments that qualify men for representing the great interests of Cities a"1! Nations, and every soul of them regarding himself as perfectly fit to fig-ure in one of tile new Municipal Councils. We seriously believe that they are. Their speeches prove their capacity. Ilr Lloyd will certainly be entitled to regard himself as ;111 injured man if he do not attain the honors of Mayor, and set a pattern of wig wisdom Of own. e

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BrecongJm-r.

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Family Notices

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CIRCUITS OF THE COMMISSIONERS…

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SPADE HUSBANDRY.

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