Symud i'r prif gynnwys
Cuddio Rhestr Erthyglau

19 erthygl ar y dudalen hon

latnorgttnüírt.

fttonmouthgiure.

TO THE EDITOR OF THE GAZETTE…

[No title]

Family Notices

[No title]

[No title]

[No title]

MERTHYR POLICE.

Brccoughtrc. »

TOTIIE EDITOR OF THE GAZETTE…

TO THE EDITOR OF THE GAZETTE…

"'TO THE EDITOR OF THE GAZETTE…

TO THE EDITOR OF THE GAZETTE…

TO THE EDITOR OF THE GAZETTE…

[No title]

- NEW SHERIFFS FOR WALES.

DEATH of the Hon. Sir THOS.…

Newyddion
Dyfynnu
Rhannu

DEATH of the Hon. Sir THOS. PAKENHA31. G. C. B. ADMIRAL OF THE RED. The demise of this distinguished Officer took place at his seat in Ireland on Tuesday last. The deceased Admiral was son of Thomas Lord Long- ford by Lady Elizabeth, who was made a Countess after his death, and brother to the late Duchess of Wellington. He was certainly one of the most distinguished Officers of the British navy, rema-ik- able for talent, prompt decision, courage and judg- ment. He first went to sea in 1770, in the South- hampton frigate, with Captain Macbride, and in 1774 proceeded to the coast of Guinea with the brave Cornwallis on his return he was appointed acting Lieutenant of the Sphinx, Captain Hunt, and sailed for North America. Early in 177(; General Lord Howe had evacuated Boston, and Lord Cornwallis had airived. It was of the utmost importance that he should be apprised of the cir- cumstance immediately, and Mr Pakenham was intrusted with the despatches of General Clinten and sent in the armed sloop General Gage to Hali- fax which port he reached, having narrowly escaped capture by an American squadron. Admi- ral Shuldam was so pleased with his skill and ability that he instantly made him a Lieutenant in the Greyhound frigate in which he was actively employed and severely vounded. On the return of the Greyhound to England Lord Mnlgrave took Mr Pakenham as Second Lieut, of the Courageuc, from which he was removed to the Europe, Admiral Arbuthnot's flag ship, and proceeded with him to North America. He was soon after made a COIn- mander, appointed to the Victor, and dispatched to the West Indies with the intelligence that Count d' Estaing had arrived on the American coast with a large fleet. On his arrival at Jamaica Captain Pakenham was transferred to the Ruby, Sir Peter Parker's flag ship, and was soon after appointed to the command of the Bristol. He then sailed with Commodore Cornwallis, and fought in those defen- sive actions which covered him with immortal honour. In these engagements Captain Pakenham distinguished himself by his coolness and judgment, for which Sir Peter Parker promoted him to the rank of Post Captain in the San Carlos, a ship taken from the Spaniards. His career was for a time suspended: the wounds he had received in the Greyhound broke out afresh, baffled all medical skill, and forced him to return to England. As soon as he recovered he was appointed to ti e command of the Crescent, of 28 guns, in which he accompanied Admiral Digby to Gibraltar, and thence to Minorca, for the relief of the garrison. He returned in company with the Flora, Captain Williams, and they fell in with two Dutch frigates of guns each which they brought to action. For two hours did Captain Pakenham comend against the superior force, but having lost his mainmast the ship became unmanageable, and lie was forced to strike but Captain Williams, hav- ing reduced his opponent, bore up to the assistance of the Crescent, and prevented the enemy from taking possession of her. Captain Pakenham came home in the Flora, leaving 1113 either killed or wounded out of 198. The Court-Martial came to the unanimous opinion "That the Honourable Captain Pakenham throughout the action behaved with the coolest and ablest judgment, and with the firmest and most determined resolution-that be did not strike till he was totally unable to make the smallest defeiiee and the Court do therefore honourably acquit him. They cannot dismiss him without expressing their admiration of his conduct, wherein he manifested the skill of an able and judicious seaman, and the intrepidity of a gallant Officer." Captain Pakenham was appointed to the Minerva in the Channel Heet, under Lord Howe, and continued her until the conclusion of the war. When the trench revolution renewed hos tilmes, Lord Chatham gave Captain Pakenham the command of the litt-incible, of 74 guns, and in the complete defeat given tothe enemy on the 1st of June he bore a distinguished part. He was mr ticularly mentioned by Lord Howe, and received a medal. Lord Chatham offered him his choice of the captured ships and he chose the Juste, the one he had himselt taken la n95 he a Colone! ot Marines and served under Admirals Waldegrave, Cornwallis, end'Allan Gardner In 1799 he was advanced to the rank of Rear-4dm; ral, in 1804 to that of Vice-Adiniral, 181;) to th I of Admiral, and in 1820 was created a Grand Cross of the Bath.

[No title]