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*1 I .1-Wisdom of the Wise…

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I 1- Wisdom of the Wise -I The life that is poured out is always lifted up. j Freedom and Right,—The one form of incanta- tiou which controls spirits.—Menzell. Every noble life leaves the fibre of it inter- woven with the work of the world.—Ruskin. Humour.—A sense of the ridiculous, softened and ameliorated by a mixture of human feelings. -ftare. Gratitude is the fairest blossom that springs from a soul; and the heart of man knowetli none more fragrant. Pleasure may pall, luxury may clog, fame may nau-seate; but the call to sacrifice, hard- ship, devotion, chivalry, never fails.—C. F. Aked. Very few men have the opportunity of being great.' but all can be true, just, honest, and faithful, even in small things.—Smiles. Those who live on the mountains have a longer dav than those who live in the valley. Some- times all we need to brighten our day is to rise a little higher. If love is not worth loving, then life is not worth living, Nor aught is worth remembering but well forgot; For store is not worth storing and gifts are not worth giving If love is not. How is it that the kingdoms and common- wealths most renowned as well for their wisdom as antiquity, are those whose piety and devotion hath been the most observable? That even man himself is never so well disposed to serve the Deity as in that part of life when reason be'ars the greatest sway." Thousands and thousands of laws there are, mightier and more venerable than those of passion; but in common with all that is en- dowed with resistless force, these laws are silent and discreet, and slow moving, and hence it is only in the twilight that they can be seen and heard, in the meditation that comes to all of us at the tranquil moments of life.—Maeterlinck. I see all things as a growth, a sublime unfold- ing by the laws of God. The race ever rises toward Him. The old things which were its best once die off from it as no longer good. Its charity grows, its justice grows. All the nobler, finer elements of its spirit come forth more and more-a continuous advance along the paths of law. The development of man is itself the great revelation of-Him.—James Lane Allen. We have heard it said that the greatest land- scape painters have been men whose eyesight was bad for details. Nature dazzles the eyes she would enchant. The seer misses many sights. The men who open the eyes of the world know when to close their own. We are not likely to find very much feeling for Nature in a gifted watchmaker. Whether this theory is actually true or no, it is certainly true metaphorically. The microscopic view of life is always an un- happy one. Sometimes one is tempted to be- lieve that almost all beauty is built up of ugly atoms. It ought to be one of the first objects of life not to see them separately. Even when the peculiarity of an animal or bird is slight—a wound, or deformity—they drive the poor victim from their midst remorse- lessly. It is a cruel instinct, but part of one of the oldest in creation, the instinct which pre- serves the species. This explains why the banned beaver never finds a mate; none of the beavers will have anything to do with him. This occasional lack of instinct is not peculiar to the beavers. Now and then a bird is hatched here in the North that has no impulse to migrate. He cries after departing comrades, but never follows. So he remains and is lost in the storms of winter. But a man is never born without the impulse to the eternal life. It has to be throttled in order that he may see his friends dying one by one without thinknig that lie too must follow. It is no longer a negative power we have, but positive; we cannot prevent, but we can do. This age, far beyond all previous ages, is full of powerful men. men who might, if they had the will for it, achieve stupendous things. The things that might be done to-day! The things, indeed, that are being done! It is the latter that give one so vast a sense of the former. When I think of the progress of physical and mechanical science, of medicine and sanitation during the last century, when I measure the increase in general education and average eiticiency, the power now available for human service, the merely physical increment, and compare it with anything that has ever been at a man's disposal before, and when I think that a little straggling, incidental, undisciplined, and unco- ordinated minority of inventors, experimenters, educators, writers, and organizers has achieved this development of human possibilities, achieved it in spite of the disregard and aimlessness of the huge majority and the passionate resistance of the active dull, my imagination grows giddy with dazzling intimations of the human .splen- dours the justly organized State may yet attain. I glimpse for a bewildering instant the heights that may be scaled, the splendid enterprises made pc-ible. T-f. G. Wells. There is doubtless a great deal of worldly suc- cess won by men who are not reliable as far as r g'iter.usness goes. But .such success has its drawbacks. It works for a while, but is apt to break down like an unreliable engine. The un- scrupulous man gains power or position, but not the respect of the better elements of the com- munity; and in the long run, his life breaks down. Every town, every city, every nation rests on the shoulders of the reliable people in its borders. They may not be its' most promi- nent or most wealthy citizens, but they are its absolutely necessary ones. The individual who determines to be reliable, determines thereby to be valuable to all around him. How did he come to be the head of the concern?" was asked about a peculiarly quiet man who forged to the front in a growing business. "Why, it was thin way," was the reply. All anybody had to do, in case of things going wrong, was to refer matters to him. He was always attentive, always cleared up the tangles, always could an- swer questions, always was ready to do more than he was eXDected to do. He was not ambi- tious; he did not want the head place especially; but what was the use of making anybody else the head when we had him?H His reliability made everyone denend upon him, and he be- came head in title because he was first the head in fact. As one follows up reliability one finds how it includes and accompanies other fine til of i-ac, Ier. In its best form it is always urisrlfr-h, rsn.llr humble, and allied wirh U a true sen e of honrur. Reliable people are apt to bo harder on themselves thiii on others, and given to bearing other folks' burdens for- them. F tienc-e beco-v.es second nature to the reliable s ul, and so do sincerity ard neighbourly kind- ness. On the other IVMHI. to be unreliable is never a fault of character that exists alone. It nraiis scU-mdulgence or d:sloy"ltv or shirking or insincerity. The unielable f 11 to the rear of life, and de-r -ve it. The "blessed company of faithful people are the ranks of the ad- varc, nnd to march among them is to find life woith living. A woman never considers love and passion as an abstract. It is associated always in her imagination with the man or with the men she has I n-fd.: with the man or with the men who have hvfd her. Love is the perrm and ways of her lover; and the subject—its significance, its philosophy—depends wholly on the quality of her own affection and -011 her experience of men in the character of wooers.—Mrs. Craigie.

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