Symud i'r prif gynnwys
Cuddio Rhestr Erthyglau

23 erthygl ar y dudalen hon

WHY WE LOST.

0 A NEW CYCLING DANGER.

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CHESTER CATHEDRAL.

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MRS. CORNWALLIS WEST. ———*———

CHESTER TRAINING COLLEGE.…

CITY POLICE COURT. ♦

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PUBLIC RIGHTS IN FLOOKERSBROOK.

CYCLISTS AND THORNS. ♦

Newyddion
Dyfynnu
Rhannu

CYCLISTS AND THORNS. ♦ ARE THE HIGHWAY AUTHORITIES LIABLE ? At the meeting of the Highways Committee of the Wirral Rural District Council on Monday, a letter was read from the Cyclists' Touring Club, stating that complaints had of late been rife in all parts of the country of the damage done to the pneumatic tyres of cycles by thorns which had been left on the highway, by the parties responsible for the up-keep and trimming of the adjoining hedges. It was stated that the council of the Cyclists' Touring Club (a body now numbering nearly 50,000 members) had taken legal opinion on the point, and were advised that to allow objectionable hedge trimmings to remain on the highways was an offence under section 72 of the Highways Act, punishable by a fine not exceeding 40s. The hope was expressed that the necessary instruc- tions would be given by the Council to the proper authorities, to see that the provisions of the Act were observed. The CLERK (Mr. W. H. Churton) said no doubt this was really a great nuisance in some places, especially in the Chirk district, where he resided. He bad actually had to carry his bicycle over a great many parts of the road in consequence of their being absolutely covered with thorns. It was a most disgraceful state of things, and simply a question of negligence and carelessness. Mr. G. W. ZEIGLER Have you ever cut a hedge yourself ? The CLERK No. Mr. ZEIGLER How is it carelessness and wanton mischief ? A man cannot be doing two things at once—cutting the hedge and brush- ing up the thorns at one time. j The CLERK: I say a man who has property adjoining the highway has no right to do one thing. Mr. ZEIGLER: If you were a farmer, you would not talk like that. The CLERK: I am not a farmer, and I am not talking from that point of view, but I say it is quite clear if a man puts anything on a road which is a nuisance to any people travelling along that road he is responsible, and brings himself within the Aet. In Wirral I am bound to say they cut the hedges very properly, and do not scatter the thorns over the road, but it is exceptional. Mr. ZEIGLER: You cannot cut the hedges properly without scattering the thorns over the road. Mr. R. JOHNSON (Prenton) maintained that when a farmer sent a man to cut the hedges he generally gave him a rake to rake up the trimmings. Before bicycles came into fashion nothing of this sort was ever thought of. He proposed that the communication should lie on the table. The CHAIRMAN (Mr. Thomas Davies) said as a farmer he was not going to brush up the trimmings for the sake of anybody's pneumatic tyres, but he always sent a rake to rake up the thorns from the road. They could not, however, rake up the little bits, and prevent them from puncturing bicycle tyres. Mr. TURTON If we are liable for this kind of thing we will never be free, because thorns are carried about by sheep, and may be blown away in all directions. The CLERK Well, I should recommend all farmers to ride bicycles, and they would never have thorns on the road after that. Mr. ZEiGLER I ride a bicycle, and you cannot possibly do it. Mr. LATHAM thought that when a farmer had cut a hedge he ought to see the thorns were raked up. The CLERK: I am bound to say so far as the Hundred of Wirral is concerned, I have never had any cause for complaint, but in some of these other places in Wales it is something awfal. The CHAIRMAN maintained that in the case of a narrow road it was impossible to remove all the thorns with an ordinary rake. The CLERK said the point of complaint was that farmers, instead of removing the trimmings after raking them up, left them on the road for months together, with the result that they were blown and kicked about. He was only speaking of the district he had alluded to. There was no doubt a farmer could be convicted if such a case was brought before the magistrates. Mr. ZEIGLER Instead of having one man to cut a hedge, it would take two—one to cut the hedge, and the other to brush up the thorns. The CHAIRMAN estimated at the least that it would require three men when a wind was blowing. Mr. LATHAM: Well, it generally takes three men to do what one man would do ten years ago. (Laughter.) Mr. ZEIGLER I propose that bicycles should be taxed, and then they will try to brush the roads. I think now that the cyclists want extra money spent on the roads it is a favourable opportunity to bring the question of a tax forward. I never met a man yet who would not pay a tax. The CLERK: I should be delighted to be taxed so far as I am concerned. The proposition that the communication should lie on the table was seconded by Mr. J. EVANS (Thurstaston), and carried. The same letter was read before the Chester Rural District Council on Saturday, when Mr. RoWE MORRIS gave notice that at the next meeting he would propose a resolution asking the local members of Parliament to give the proposed cycle tax their support. The letter was read at the Hoole District Council on Monday. The Clerk (Mr. A. E. Caldecutt) remarked that the Council would prosecute in cases of this sort, and no doubt the Cyclists' Touring Club would pay the costs. (Laughter.)—Mr. Night- ingale thought it would be hard lines on farmers to do this. Cyclists should pay 2s. 6d. a year—(a Voice: Say 7s. 6d.)-for a licence, and the money should be Epent in the district where the licence was taken out. The road- men should then remove the thorns; it would take farmers and others all their time in look- I ing after that kind of work.—Mr. Woodward said any one could do it with a switch in a few minutes.—The Clerk suggested that cyclists should have a cow-catcher kind of a thing in front of their machine to brush thorns &c., away. (Laughter.)—The matter here dropped. The communication also came before the Denbigh Rural District Council for the St. Asaph Union on Friday. The reading of the letter was received with laughter, and it was ordered to lie on the table.

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