Cuddio Rhestr Erthyglau

22 erthygl ar y dudalen hon

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Rhannu

FROM WEYMOUTH TO ST. IIELIERS (JERSEY) AT NIGHT. It's 12 p.m. at Weymouth, it's dark and dull o'er head, The busy town is silent, the weary are in bed But what's this noise and bustle by strangers to and fro? They are passing to the steamer, which lies ensconced below,— They are bent on going to Jersey across the dark blue wave, For a day or so of sunshine, which for weeks they've had to crave. They've been toiling in old England-for toilers there must be, But now they seek for pleasure across the troubled sea. They hasten to the vessel's side, send luggage to the h ld, O'er s and blocks they hurry, and in their arms enfold Some ticles too precious to be stowed amongst the ass, Tb, .,Id them tight for safety, or they would go like ^lass. Tlies- inexperienced landsmen are now jolly, stout, and brave, The pood ship's still at present-she has not disturbed a wave; p." steam is up, the anchor's weighed, we gently glide from shore, P.d dangerous points and sunken rocks-the tidal wave is o'er. But !J upon the water, what glittering stars we sight, While dark o'erhead as dungeon—'tis phosphorescent light; It shine and glistens in the gloom with radiance known to few, 'Ti, :,ot .) those who plough the deep such sights are h, ugh t to view. Anon, the breeze is stronger-the waves begin to rise And battle with the proud bold ship as o'er their crest she flies. But. that's going on below the deck? Shall I the scene descry ? Or. rather, shall I pity those who thought they then must die ? The brave's cast down, the stout heart quails, the jolly, too, are mute. Oh, steward, what's that vessel for ? For me? Ah yes, 'twill suit. Lut o'er this scene I draw a veil, 'tis now the dawn of 'lay, I to the deck ascend some steps and see a grand display; The wind had died away, and from mid channel to the shore There stretched a scene of beauty I ne'er had dreamt before. Far away in the east, in a line with the sea- Where cloudlets and mists are all scattered and free- The bright orb of day, now rising so bright, Taks* away from my thoughts the scenes of the night. What glorious light now rises o'erhead, Whilst laggard and sluggard are resting in bed Wi at a scene for a painter-the man of fine art- If he to his canvas its charms could impart. But Nature's supreme, and art is but faint, And the artist's best efforts would fail him to paint- The vast fiery globe come from Neptune's deep grave, To lighten the land and the deep rolling wave The sea-bird now rising aloft in the air, With white spreading pinions its glories to share, Now of our good ship keeping close to the trail To pick up the crumbs which on the waves sail. My silver-winged friend, where do you reside ? On the wave-crested rock, or the wide flowing tide ? No cry have you uttered nor do you complain, But pick up the morsels that float on the main The wind is against you, yet still you succeed To pick up sufficient to satisfy need \ou ve no discontent nor thought of the morrow, No forebodings of gloom or halfway-met sorrow. Now. may I from you a lesson retain, T re patient and thankful and never complain, But receive what is sent from the Hands that sustain, And practice the wisdom of birds of the main. Now Guernsey and Sark we descry far ahead, « eli giidcd with rocks from ocean's deep bed- But fertile withiv with air bracing and free- A landmark for th"se far away on the sea. Again we pass onward for thirty miles more, And enjoy the land breeze while reviewing the shore. AN hat huge blocks of granite here cover the strand Sure a battle of giants was fought hand to hand have rounded the point, St. Auben's in view, And farther down south see Fort Regent, too. But what is that sound-that concussion of air- That splash in the water-wha.t's going on there? 'Tis a shell from Fort Regent, high towering rock, That caused the concussion and gave such a shock. Elizabeth Castle,—the Hermitage—past. And hurrah for St. Helier's, we've found thee at last' Pontypool. J. II.

'TWIXT CUP AND LIP.

CHAPTER XIV.

CAPTAIN CAREY.

KILLING WOUNDED ZULUS.I

I SEA BATHING ACCIDENT.

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CAPTAIN CAREY'S CAREER.

- INEXHAUSTIBLE FUEL.

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REV. J. P. BELLINGHAM ON PRIMITIVE…

A CWMBRAN CASE AT NEWPORT…

REPRESENTATION OF MONMOUTHSHIRE.

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THE WEST OF ENGLAND BANK.

ALBERT MEDALS FOR WELSH COLLIERS.

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--------CONTINUOUS CORN-GEOtTOO-

THE MAD KING OF BURMAH.

I 1, THE EUSTON SQUARE MYSTERY.'

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