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Life Undep the Terrible Bolshevik

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Life Undep the Terrible Bolshevik LADY SPEAKER'S ADDRESS '10 CARMARTHEN UNIONISTS. -AIR. MERYYN PEEL AND COALITION. Despite the stormy weather, there was a good attendance at a social evening held a' the sale-room o £ the Ivy Bus'.i Hotel on Ihursday evening, 18th inst., in connection with the Carmarthen Borough Conservative and Unionist Association, and he audience were deeply impressed by an n:shudiyc address OIl life in Soviet Russia given hy Mrs. E. Urch, a. British woman, who, with her hnsbnnd and family. has lived under P.olshevik rule for about 18 months. Mrs. CTch narrated harrowing- stories of cruelty and oppression, starvation and mas- sacre under the Lenin and Trotsky govern- ment. The other speaker was Air. Mervvn Ppel, Danyrallt (chairman of the Carmar- then Division Unionist Association., who delivered a rousing address. Aid. Walter Spin,'roll (vioe-pnesident ol the Carmarthen Division I'nionist Associa- tion), presided, and was supported on the Puitform by the speakers. Miss P. Richards, Picton-ter^ace (vice-president Carmarthen Woirjpn's Unionist Association); "s. Alfred Thomas (secretary Carmarthen Di.vi^on Women's Unionist, Association); Aid. Wm. Evans (chairman Carmarthen Borough t-iiionist Association); Aid. J. B. v rthur (vice-chairman), Mr. James Davies (treasurer). and Mr. T. F. James, Unionist Agent for the Division. The Chairman explained that they hoped that meeting would be the first of a series 0; meetings to be held. Letters of apology for inability to attend were received from Lord and Lady Dyn- evcr, Sir Owen and Lady Philipps, and Col. Delme DaVies-Evars, D.S.O. Mrs. Urch. who was attired in one of the Russian national costumes, explained that her husband opened a. school at Riga to teach English, but when the Germans entered during the war, she and her hus- band and children removed to Moscow. She ventured to assert that not one British worker who had escaped from Soviet Russia could be induced to say one syllable in favour of Soviet Russia, neither would h0 deny what she was going to relate to 'hem. Was not the question of the struggle of Russia against Bolshevism of impor- tance to us? Did they not know that the Bolsheviks boldly declared that their foreign policy was a guarantee of a world 'revolu- tion: When the Tsar and his bureaucracy was overthrown, all classes were agreed on the country's stagnant state of corruption nnd the great need of reform..No right- minded man denied that the lahouring and peasant, classes had been greatly oppressed, lnd when the first revolution came the hearts of the people swelled with patriotic pride, and they expected the wonderful ad- vance of new Russia, but the stupendous problem of that. hour proved beyond the grasp of Kerenskv, who at that time was held as the saviour of his people. The Bolsheviks, a small party in the Provisional Government, knew what they wanted, and unlike Kerensky, they did not mtml descen- ding to any depths in order to obtain their ends. That, coupled with the apathy of the people, was one explanation of the Bol- sheviks' successful seizure of power. The -Jjarty was composed chiefly of political exiles of Jewish or Geifnan or^in and a P:: few scoundrels, who pursued their own views of what government should be by ^exterminating all who differed from them. Zenovia, the head commissaire for Pet-ro- grad. said ol the second Petrograd Confer- ence. "We must win over 90 millions out of the 100 million people in Russia, and those who oppose us must be annihilated." In August. 1918, one of the proclamations posted up in the streets of Moscow con- tained these wards; "All who are not on our side must be swept from the face of -it the earth," and a later proclamation de- clared: 'All Socialists who are not extre- mists will be treated as traitors. At the beginning, the Government regarded the Bolsheviks as a harmless minority. Was. not that the attitude of the British public to-day towards our Bolsheviks? Referring to the second Revolution, Mrs. Urch (des- cribed the scenes in Moscow, and said that after a week of fighting under their very windows, the noise began to suddenly cease, and people begtan to steal out of their houses. On reading the declarations in the streets that the Bolsheviks had won, their astonishment was very great. The dead had all been removed, but the gutters of some of the main streets, especially the t/ramway junctions, were riming with blood. Whole blocks of buildings were destroyed. How many perished would never be known. It was only a matter of a few days for might to have become right. All laws were abolished, and the govern- ment depended on the will of the head Bol- sheviks, whose decrees appeared every few days on the walls in the streets. Limita- tions and restrictions increased until the people expected nothing, were sure ot nothing, save death. Neither were they free to leave the town. Liberty—there was ISO much of it that an ordinary individual was afraid to go out. Not content with enslaving the body, they deprived the in- dividual of mental and spiritual liberty too. The Russian ikons were covered with a red flag or removed or replaced by a placard stating, "'Religion is opium to the people." All newspapers were suppressed save the Bolshevik press. The anti-Bol- shevik movement originated in the bitter experience of the enslaved people. She had been reading of Britishers calling them- selves Bolsheviks and who were looking forward to a Soviet Republic in this country. Let the people of this country not awake from their apathy and neutrality to the danger of these extremists too late, as was done in Soviet Russia. Let them realise that such a flood of ruin would engulf not only the titled, wealthy, and middle classes, but also the working-classes themselves. The horrors of Bolshevik war- fare outrivaIled the cruelty of the Germans. Speaking of what she saw al Moscow, the headquarters of the Bolsheviks, she stated that whilst the head Bolsheviks travelled in luxurious motors and well-upholstered trains others had to go on foot. Last March prac- tically all the horses had died and had been eaten. In Moscow, with over two million inhabitants, there were no trains, only a few military trains and one French Mission train once in six weeks, by which foreigneis might leave the country. No Russians could travel by that train. Rotting away outside the drill hall in Moscow- were numbers of motors which had been taken from the caoitalists and were 1101. needed by the head Bolshevik? How did the worker- profit by all this? Whilst the head Bolsheviks lived in the finest houses. fli(, pavements ot which were blocked nnd well guarded, others were without a roof. ould any worker

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CARMARTHEN SOLDIER'S DEATH.

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GORSLAS.

NEWCASTLE EMLYN.

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Life Undep the Terrible Bolshevik