Symud i'r prif gynnwys
Cuddio Rhestr Erthyglau

18 erthygl ar y dudalen hon

SPAIN'S EFFORTS TO BECOME…

FACTS ABOUT THE NEGRO.

DEBTOR AND CREDITOR.

PAST AND PRESENT TIMES.

RAILWAYS IN TIME OF WAR.

THE EMPEROR OF RUSSIA AT THE…

A PANEGYRIC ON THE POPE.

THE CONVEYANCE OF CATTLE,…

A RAILWAY CASE.

LUGGAGE ON RAILWAY CARRIAGES.

HOW MRS. JONES GOT HER SUBSCRIPTION.

NOTES ABOUT HIGHWAYMEN.

THE CROWN JEWELS OF PERSIA.

THE POLISH AMNESTY.

BANNS OF MARRIAGE.

ITEACHING SAVAGES TO SING.

Newyddion
Dyfynnu
Rhannu

TEACHING SAVAGES TO SING. More than five years ago classes on the, tonic sol-fa method of teaching singing were at work in Capetown, South Africa, among the native children and adults. Mr. Curwen has at the present time the addresses of twenty-five teachers in "South Africa. There are seven in Capetown, and five in Grahamstown. Mr. C. Birkett, who introduced the method in Grahamstown, writes as follows to Mr. Curwen:— Though I have left the work it is still carried on by those who were members of my different classes. The Rev. Mr. Turpin (Episcopalian) is most enthusiastic in his native school and congregation. Mr. Weddi- burn (Wesleyan) conducts classes in connection with one of the Wesleyan chapels, and also at the native Sunday schools-Kafir and coloured. Mr. Hawkins (Baptist) has classes which have at different-times come before the public very creditably. The propaga- tion of the system amongst the rude heathen, and also on the out-stations of the missions, is somewhat inte- resting. One or two school people go out and are on a visit among the people for sometime they carry the school tunes with them. They sing them in sol-fa," not at all caring for the words unless they are in Kafir. Night after night they entertain their friends with the pieces they have learned from the teachers at the stations, and the pieces are soon picked up by the listeners. Tunes with harmonies in full are thus car- ried from one place to another. They don't require written copies indeed, many who thus learn have not acquired the ability to read letters. Once I heard some sweet voices in a strange place where I was travelling most sportively humming an air that I knew. I listened, and recognised "SIniling May but there were other voices playfully accompanying the air-a rolling female bass and a staccato second- and all in the graceful rythm of the measured step of girls with water-pots on their heads coming from the fountain. I enquired of the lady where I was lodging for the night, and she told me that Josiah Bemi, a native teacher from my school, had been up there on a visit the previous week, and the young people had been singing night and day ever since.

A PLEASANT PROSPECT.

THR DANGERS OF, TIGER SHOOTING.