Symud i'r prif gynnwys
Cuddio Rhestr Erthyglau

17 erthygl ar y dudalen hon

-THE CHARITY OF THE PEOPLEI…

Newyddion
Dyfynnu
Rhannu

-THE CHARITY OF THE PEOPLE I OF ENGLAND. Whether it is true or not that we English people are going backwards in the matter of skilled mechanical labour, no one can deny that in our charitable pro- ceedings we show continual signs of advance, though sometimes our movements are of a somewhat eccentric kind (remarks the Pall Mall Gazette). Every Whit- suntide sees some fresh manifestations of one of the very best of these movements—the annual holiday- making of the children of poor schools. Manchester, for some time one of the foremost in the good work, is now as advanced in this way as it is advanced in politics. All its various schools, both Church and non-Church, are making trips into the surrounding country, not for a few hurried hours on a single day, but for two or three days together, and some of them to sui prising distances, reaching even such far-off places as Llangollen, Matlock, and Dove Dale. Then there is the Manchester Unity of Odd Fel- lows," which at this season holds its miniature annual Parliament, reviews its condition, and announces its cash balance. It now numbers more than 400,000 members, and has a capital of nearly two millions sterling. Its members have just subscribed about 500Z. among themselves to present a lifeboat, to be cill^rl the Odd Fellow, to the National Lifeboat Institution. In London the last-announced movements of the charitable are of the more eccentric kind. The season of fancy bazaars is setting in with its usual severity, and those who will study the advertising columns of the papers will be duly edified with the intensely fashionable character of the various lists of lady patronesses and lady stall-holders. They will also perhaps wonder who in the world are the gentlemen amateurs known as the White Lilies of the Prairie," who are to give a series of performances at one of these bazaars, and whether they call themselves White Lilies because they blacken their faces m order to look as like nigger minstrels as possible. But what may not be expected to be the proceeds of a concert at Exetr-r H:tll-an oratorio performance, it need hardly be added—to which the British public is invited to hear an actual British duchess sing all the soprano solos ? The list of patrons and patronesses is, we can assure the said public, in the highest degree aristocratic and ecclesiastic and if the House of Relief for Chil- dren with Chronic Diseases of the Joints" does not* largely benefit from the singing of two ladies of fashion, the British public must have very strangely altered of late. Not that there can be much objection to the appearance of ladies, from duchesses downwards, on the platform of a concert room. The practice has for years past been spreading in the country, and certainly a lady appears in a much more agreeable light when she sings in a musical per- formance than when she flirts behind a stall at a fancy bazaar.

----_--__-----CURIOUS PRESENTS…

A NEW SYSTEM OF RAILS.

BRITISH WORKMEN IN PARIS.

THE GLOSSOP CONVENT.

AN EPIDEMIC WITH AN ALIAS.

THE SILVER MINT OF JAPAN.

iSARMY DRESS AND EQUIPMENTS.

THE ABYSSINIAN PRISONERS.…

AN UNHAPPY MARRIED LIFE.

THE PRUSSIAN EMBASSY BALL.

THE HOUSE OF PEERS.

A SCOTCHMAN'S TASTE FOR MUSIC!

A SAD TALE OF 'THE SEA. »…

VACCINATION AS A SAFEGUARD.…

FATAL RESULTS OF A QUARREL.

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