Symud i'r prif gynnwys
Cuddio Rhestr Erthyglau

39 erthygl ar y dudalen hon

__------.--THE LOCAL VETO…

Newyddion
Dyfynnu
Rhannu

THE LOCAL VETO BILL, MEETING OF PUBLICANS AT CARDIFF. CONDEMNATION OF THE GOVERN- MENT PROPOSALS. A eetin was held on Monday night in the Queen-street Hall, Cardiff to protest against the Govprnmpnt's licensing )1rupo,:al", as set out in the Liquor Traffic (Local Control) Bill. Councillor Robert Hughes was called upon to preside. The hall was well filled. On thy platform were Coun- cillor S. A. Brain, Councillor W. Evans, Coun- cillor Gerhold, Mr D. J. Lennox (Dublin), Mr E. Prickett, Mr S. O. Williams, Mr John Williams, Air John Edwards, Mr D. S. Johnston, Mr Marks. Mr Lennox, Mr T. Edwards, Mr Taliesin Morgan, &c. The CHAIRMAN, in opening the proceedings said he would venture to describe the Bill as one of the most iniquitous measures ever presented to Parliament. In the first- place he would like to say that that was no political gathering. ( Hear, hear,) If the otner party in the State had pro. posed such a measure as that they would still be gathered there to protest against the action in like manner that they were now protesting against this. Both parties in the State drank beer and spirits, and the Veto Bill, therefore, ap- plied equally to both parties. He would give the Government every credit for having intro- duced this measure with a. sincere desire to lessen drunkenness. (Applause.) They were quite willing to recognise that fact but it was impossible to deny that in one respect—theSunday closing—the result of pro- hibition in Wales had lieen a lamentable failure. (Applause.) He could unhesitatingly state that the pe0ple who were Ulost immediately connected with the liquor traffic were doing a great deal more towards lessening drunkenness than all the ministers in Cardiff put together—(hear, hear)— for the simple reason that whilst the ministors were unable to reach those who were called the lost sheep, the been sed victualler was brought into constant contact with those people. (Ap- plause.) MrD. T. MORInS (Penarth), submitted the first resolution as follows .— That this public meeting of the inhabitants of Cardiff desires to reenrd its em, hatic protest ag8inst 1he Liquor Traffic -.Local Control) Bill introduced by the Government in the Howe of Commons, becanse it contains proposals which are unfair and unjust to those enaged in the licensing trade, and involves a wholly unwarranted interference with the liberty of the subject; and that, for these reasons, this meeting also stronglv condemns the Liquor Traffic Local Veto (Wales) BIll. He declared himself as being quite independent of the trade." Mr W. H. DAVIES seconded the resolution, and Mr D. J. LENox (Dublin) spoke in support. He said the Bdl introduced into the House of Commons by Sir William Harcourt—(applause and hisses)-so violated every principle of honesty and fair play, and so infringed upon th° liberties of the subject, that it stood immediately self- condemned. (Applause.) It was a piece of class legislation, and had been rightly calied "The Rich Man's Protection Bill and the Poor Man's Oppression Bill." (Applause.) They found that after the passing of the Bill the brewer could go on brewing beer, the distiller making whisky, and the wholesale merchant importing wines and gins and while the big buyer could go on buying all these articles in bulk, the working-man was to be prohibited from rationally and socially enjoying his pint of beer. (Shame.) Having quoted words of the late Mr John Bright in opposition to the Permissive Bili, he said that all the objections which that statesman then urged, with equal force and with re- doubled intensity on the Liquor Traffic (Local Control) Bili of the present Government. The total revenue raised in this country from all sources was over ninety millions sterling, and of this some thirty-one millions were contributed from the trade of intoxicating liquors. And besides this, an additional sum of three millions was collected from the same trade, and placed to the relief of the local rates. Now,if this Confisca- tion Bill passed, from where would they get this thirty-four muiions ? (A Voice: From the coffee taverns." Laughter.) Was the income tax to be raised to thre times its present amount, or was the duty on tea, coffee, tobacco, and such like commodities to be doubled ? He denied that the Bill would promote the interests of sobriety, temperance, and morality, and contended that it would have quite a con- trary ffect. Shebeens anù bogus Cillbs w,)ulrJ be multiplied indefinitely. Then, if the Bill became law, questions would be continually arismg as to whether a house was a bogus eating- house or a bogus hotel and the difficulties which lay in its way would be innumerable. As to the Local Veto (Wales) BUI, this was a private member's Bill, which the Government did not feel inclined to support because it comphoatej the situation regarding their own Bill. But on that Bill there would be a fair and square stand- up fight m the House of Commons on Wednes- day. (Applause.) The verdict pronounced upon it two years ago, when it was read a second time by a majority of six, wiil be emphatically and distinctly reversed on the present occasion. (Ap- plause.) Mr HARRY MURPHY, who as one of the greatest upholders of the present Government, supported the resolution. There were, ho said, about a million and a half people employed in the trade," and he would ask what would bocome of tbese people if they were thrown upon an already over-stocked labour market. Mr W. H. OWEN, district secretary of the Grand United Order of Oddfellows, said he had been deputed to attend that meeting by a Lodge. held at the Craddock Hotel, to speak in opposi- tion to the Government licensing proposals. He asked what would be the effect of the provisions of the Bill ujxm-trade and friendly societies, the large proportion of which met at public-houses ? The experiment of holding meetings of Friendly Societies at coffee-taverns had proved an utter failure. He did not know why, but such was the case. The resolution was carried by a large majority, the CHAIRMAN declaring that" ten beardless boys" had voted against it. (Laughter and hootin. ) Councillor BROWN proposed the following resolution :— That copies of the resolution be forwar.1ed to mem- bers of her Majesty's Government and to the whole of the Welsh IL> embers. He knew it would be a course which would be rather" up" against the Welsh members, who were trying to ram their opinions down the throats of the electors. He would contend that the majority of the people of this country were iu favour of the sale of intoxicating drink and he maintained that thu proposed measure wa. simply and purely a direct attack on the working classes. It was a piece of grandmotherly legislation, and if carried would double the amount of crime m the country. He was sorry to see the Welsh members had brought it forward. It was so very foolish, and a disgrace to any House of Commons tbat ever existed. (Applause). Councillor GFJRHOLU seconded the motion. He said in the past the licensed victuallers had had to stand alone to fight the battles waged against them by the opponents of the trade, but to-day .they were in the proud position of having the working men—the backbone of the country— on their side. He (the working man) had found out that this was no political matter, and had ranged himself by the side of the licensed vic-uallers to endeavour to defeat this iniquitous Bill. (Applau=e.) With his support they had no fear as to the rpuIt. He complained that some legislators wished to treat Wales as an exceptional country. The opponents of the trade in Wales were not satisfied with leaving them simply to the tender mercies of the Government Bill, but they had :1 second barrel to their gun, and if the English Bill failed, they would h3ve an0ther shot at poor, unfortunate Wales. This was distinctly unfair, and an insult to the Welsh people. (Applause.) The resolution was adoptt>d, and the meet1D closed with a vote of thanks to the chairman. At the weekly meeting of the Swansea Gospel Temperance Union, the following resolution was unanimously passed:- That this meeting whilst rejoicing-:1t tile steps now being taken hy th Govprmnent with rr-¡,:ar to the stoppage of the drink traffic, desires them to prei's the BiH forward. It also the Liberal Party to watch it,; pror"s, and wishes them to add or "11"\J(1 clauses as they think fit, at the same tirao praying for the upport of the Welsh members.

LIBERAL BREWERS AND THE BILL.

MR T. P. JENKINS, J.P., ON…

THE STRIKE OF BOILERMAKERS…

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SERMON BY THE BISHOP OF SWANSEA.

MEETING OF LAYMEN AT CARMARTHEN.

SWANSEA.

CHURCH ACTIVITY AT WHITCHURCH.

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THE EMPIRE (CARDIFF).

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MOUNTAIN ASH.

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BLACKWOOD. ;

MARGAM.

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COMMENTS BY THE " VOLUNTEER…

CARDIFF COUNTY BOKOUGII !…

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NEWPORT.

THE FATAL BRAWL AT NEWPORT.

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ANTICIPATIONS.

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