Symud i'r prif gynnwys
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18 erthygl ar y dudalen hon

THE FOOD SUPPLY OF THE POULTRY…

Newyddion
Dyfynnu
Rhannu

THE FOOD SUPPLY OF THE POULTRY YARD. In the management of the poultry yard the food supply is a. matter of no small importance, for very much depends upon the manner in which this matter is regulated whether the keeping of poultry is profit- able or not. Indeed, where the number of fowls kept is large, it is by no means difficult to incur a heavy loss, either by the injudicious selection of food or by giving it to the birds in excess of their require- ments. With reference to the selection of food, it may be said that those who have but little time on their hands, or are averse to taking much trouble, will find the Indian corn or maize to be most excellent, as it will require no preparation, will maintain the birds in fine condition, and there is no risk of its being eaten by the sparrows, as they cannot swallow it when whole. But a diet consisting wholly of maize is not so good for laying hens as one somewhat mixed in character, as it-is rather too heating in its effects, and usually promotes the production of more fat than is desirable. Oats and barley are both excellent, and may be given separately or in mixture with each other or with maize, and undoubtedly the most successful results are insured by varying the diet somewhat. The cern should, as a matter of course, be largely supplemented by scraps, consisting of pieces of bread, potatoes, and meat from the kitchen, and a vessel should be placed in a cool place near at hand for receiving such scraps as are capable of utilisation in the poultry yard. Pieces of meat chopped up fine will also be exceed- ingly useful for birds that are shut in small yards, and will in some degree make amends for the loss of worms and insects, which can only be obtained where there is a good run over meadow and pasture lands. Pota- toes well boiled and broken up and well mixed Jwith bran or coarse pollard, preferably the latter after it has been scalded, are of much value for feeding pur- poses, and this is a capital way of utilising surplus stores. No matter what the food may be, sufficient should be given to keep the birds in good condition and no more, and a little observation will enable any- one to determine this point. They should, in fact, have as much as they will eat without leaving any, for when the food lies about on the ground for any length of time after each meal it may be assumed that the supply is in excess of the requirements, and that considerable waste is gomg on. In a general way, fowls kept entirely within enclosed yards should have three meals a day, the first to be of soft food, consisting of kitchen scraps, potatoes, and pollard in mixture, and the other two of corn. The preparation of soft food is undoubtedly attended v ith some degree of trouble, but as it affords a ready means for the utilisation of waste, and the change is an agreeable one to the occupants of the yards, it will give an ample return for the trouble occasioned. A bountiful supply of clean water must be provided, and if practicable, the supply of green food, such as the leaves of cabbage, lettuce, cauliflowers, and broccolis, should be liberal, and whether the quantity of green food available is large or small a portion ought to be thrown into the yard once a day.— Gardeners' Magazine.

IMPRISONMENT OF CHILDREN.

SANITATION IN NEW YORK.

SUSPENSION OF A LONDON BANK.

THE AGRICULTURAL OUTLOOK.

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THE ROYAL ACADEMY BANQUET.

THE NAVAL BRIGADE AT TAMAI.

OUR CARRIAGES.

DEATH OF THE EMPRESS MARIA…

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THE MAHDI AND HIS MEN.

THE LATE VISCOUNT TORRINGTON.…

-., KILLED BY A LION.,

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GARDENING FOR THE WEEK.

THE PORT OF MONTREAL.'

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