Symud i'r prif gynnwys
Cuddio Rhestr Erthyglau

13 erthygl ar y dudalen hon

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ELECTORAL THROES.

Newyddion
Dyfynnu
Rhannu

ELECTORAL THROES. THE sluice-valves of electioneering literature are open, rival electoral bands are playing, irrepressible canvassing nuisances are rampant, and until the 27th, when the climax will be reached, floods of cards, posters, addresses, will inundate the voter; music, pitched in the minor and major keys, covering eveiy conceivable tone and semi-tone, and producing a medley of sounds of the unrhymic order, will assail his ears; and incessant appeals for his suffrage, sensible and insensate, by principals and by envoys, will continue to make the ratepayer's life oppressive. Everything has its price, and this is the price the people pay for democracy. True, the printer's products may be ignored; to the Babel of tongues-the inharmonious music-a deaf ear may be turned; but the canvasser is ubiquitous, and from him there is, there can be, no escape. This is the thorn in the rose, the bitter element in the democratic sweet. When the elector is lastingly conscious of his importance, when he permanently, not transiently as is the case to-day, realises his power—realises to what extent the government of his country, his county, his town, is in his own hands, canvassing will be made illegal. But the time for that is not yet. The British workman has not grasped the meaning of the franchise; he is in the "larva" state in relation to his privileges; but wheu the potentialities of the vote dawns upon him, when his education, which the Board Schools, the press, and the political organisations are hastening, is com- plete, the significance of government of the people, for the people, by the people," will be fully understood. Canvassing is an inevitable adjunct of the indifference collateral with unenlightenment, and until it can be removed the soliciting incubus must be endured. Happy is the Trades Council in their nominee; happy the nominee in a strong opponent generous enough to withdraw from the contest; and happy the North Ward ratepayers in a re- presentative elect who will give full value for the confidence reposed in him. Everything has its price, and full value on the part of a public representative is the only price that can con- scientiously be paid for the distinction of selec- tion and election. Full value should be asked for and demanded of every successful candidate, and only those aspirants to municipal laurels who are capable of paying the price should be favoured with the votes of the people. And of what does full value consist ? In a represen- tive it means, not the apotheosis, but the abnegation of self; the subordination of private to collective interests the sacrificing of home and family claims to public duty; unfailing attendance, not only at Council meetings where there is a little glory and less work; but at committee meetings, where there is much work and no glory—it means sterling honesty in every deal; careful application to every question; the possession of a natural aptitude for the avocation, and the constant manifestation of patriotism in its widest and best sense. The latter attribute covers the moral ground, for the Councillor who is patriotic is upright in his transactions, faithful in the discharge of his duties, jealous of his own and his constituents' honour, and a stranger to every ignoble quality. But for efficient administration there are pro- perties other than ethical required in our public men, and these should be insisted on as a fair exchange for the honour of a seat on the Council. In the South, the East, and the West Wards, a superabundance of candidates appeal for the elector's votes. The Wards have their price; let full value be exacted. It is necessary to have the promise to pay in full; but a promise is at best poor security to rely on. The intel- lectual and moral banking accounts of the candidates should be enquired into, together with the opportunities each one is likely to have of redeeming his pledges, and those only chosen who are in the best position to pay full value. Motives, when ascertainable, determine in a measure the punishment meted out to the breaker of the laws, and the motives of the Council aspirants, if "get-at-able," should decide the support accorded by the ratepayer. It is not difficult, as a rule, to distinguish the self-seeker from the disinterested one-the spurious from the unadulterated article.

ST. PATRICK'S DAY.

ALLEGED INFANTICIDE AT BARRY.

THE BARRY JURY'S QUANDARY.

LOCAL CASES AT THE ASSIZES.