Cuddio Rhestr Erthyglau

9 erthygl ar y dudalen hon

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POET'S CORNER.

HER VENGEANCE

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FUN AND FANCY.

FOR THE YOUNG FOLKS."

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Newyddion
Dyfynnu
Rhannu

0. _=- FOR MATRON AND MAID. 1 NEATNESS IS BUSINESSLIKE. It is not vanity that leacts a woman to bother over clothcs. Tbiit they are a bother she does not deny; often she sighs that she was net born a savage or in the era of one best black silk for half a lifetime. The beauty cannot afford to be scornful of clothes and the ugly woman dare not afford it. A becoming dres*; or a fetching hat has sealed many a rift in the family circle that no amount of argument could banish. Whore is the business man who is not influ- enced insensibly by well-dressed employees? A dowdy, unkempt woman about a business of- fice or shop has become a rarity, not because woman lovos clothes, but because she knows they are a distinct ai6 £ t, and that no long- headed employer woulaletand for careless dressy ing. WRITE FEWER LETTERS. This is not generally considered a letter-writ- ing age. Tho telephone and telegraph have done away with volumes of correspondence; and the hurly-burly and rush of modern exis- tence with more. There are persons, however, who overdo in writing letters in ways that are injurious to their general health. One of the first commands to nervously ex- hausted patients when put into the hands of a specialist, is "Stop your letters for a time." Doctors declare this pursuit uses up a sur- prising amount of nervous energy that should be stored up for building up of tissues and nerves. This may seem ridiculous to the woman who writes easily. She feels-it is nothing at all, a mere matter of course to dash off half a dozen notes and one or two friendly letters at a sit- ting. Yet let her once give the subject considera- tion and she will acknowledge a feeling of las- situde and a certain sense of strain after get- ting up from her desk. THE SENSIBLE MOTHER. The mother who desires. comfort does not spend her time telling her children what not to do; she provides them with things they will want to do. She frowns on daintiea between meals except as a special treat. Indigestion means family ructions all round. She does not believe in fine feathers making fine birdlings. She knows that the dressed-up child is thoroughly uncomfortable, and soon has his mother in a like state. Nor does she think it conducive to her own child's comfort to keep it up to all hours. The early to bed rule is worked for the peace of the household. She is not inordinately' ambitious. Prodigies are flattering to maternal vanity, but the un- pushed boy or girl is more comfortable to live with. with. She does not think indulgence makes for content. The mother who is thoroughly uncom- fortable in her children is the one. who has ,never trained them to obey. OLD TEAR TRACKS. Some folks keep straying back mentally to the paths where their feet wandered in the gar- den of sorrow. They continue to dwell in the temples of lost joy, and live over again the moments of their keenest sufferings—sometimes even of their bitterest mistakes. These "tracks of old tears," as the poet has called them, allure so that the woman who forces herself apparently to forget things that are best forgotten is often spoken of as heart- less, flippant and superficial. A BEAUTIFUL SILENCE. Good listeners rarely have things to regret— and that is much in the favour of silence. Then, too, by listening attentively there will be gain- ed a certain knowledge and valuable informa- tion that may in time result in an easy, self- possessed ability to talk well. Indeed, it is often found that more good listeners are needed in the social world. This is a plea for the useful art of keeping the lips closed while others speak. For the silent ones there should never be despair. LEARNING EARLY. To learn to respect the perfection of things is of infinite value to a child. If it is a .flower, to shelter and try to keep it alive, never wan- tonly to pluck and fling away a blossom; if it is a book, not to deface or mar it; if it is a wall, not to mark or deface it; if it is a smooth rolled lawn, not to litter it with rubbish or j spoil it with wheel marks. To learn to wait ] patiently, all the lives long they will give i thanks for having been taught how to do this. How many a pleasant talk has been interrupt- | ed, how many an otherwise helpful visit has been lost by a teasing, pulling child, torment- ing its mother either to listen to its demands or to go out! The whole of its life lies in what the child learns of these things, and unless taught happiiy and early, it must either grow into eaJfhh manhood or womanhood, or have the evil beaten out by the bard and bitter teachings of the world. JOTTINGS. To conquer one great fault is something. It is well to repeat anything good of others. Avoid useless conversations which make you lose time and hinder real work. We always hear the sermon for the folks in the next pew. One sharp word is worse than all the faults you see in others. Politeness is an air cushion. There is not much in it, but it eases the joints wonder- fully. Wisdom consists in knowing when and how to speak, and when and where to be silent. PREPARE FOR EMERGENCIES. It, should be no hardship for any girl to take hold and learn the science of housekeeping, even if she may never be obliged to do a single one of things taught her. She should learn that there is an easy as well as a difficult way to prepare a meal, and that if she will but bring a small part of the intelligence she has shown in mastering rules of syntax and per- fecting herself in languages to the doing of these apparently homely but really vital neces- sities of daily existenoe, she can do them far better than if that intelligence had never been tested. Even if your daughter rejoices in the fact that she need never trouble about house duties her- self, forget not that life is full of woeful sur- prises in the way of changing fortunes, so pre- pare her for the emergency which may never come. HINTS FOR THE HOME. When Pouring Hot Fat into a basin add a tablespoonful of boiling water to it. This will cause all pieces of meat to sink to the bottom. When it is set dripping that is treated in this way will be found beautifully clear and white. Sulphur Ointment.—Take 1 lb. of pig's flare, cut up and render down. Strain off. Add 4 oz. flour of sulphur, and mix well together. When thoroughly mixed cool and pot in small jars. This is a simple recipe, and will be found very cooling for irritation, etc. This is also excel- lent. for limb3 with rheumatism which irritate. Strengthening Jelly.—Steep 2 ozs. of isin- glass and £ oz. of gum arabic in a pint of port wine all night. Then put it in aclean sauce- pan with 2 oz. of brown sugar candy and half a small nutmeg grated; simmer them to- gether until quite dissolved; strain through sieve or piece of muslin. When cold cut :n small pieces. Take one three or four times a day. This recipe is excellent. To Revive Dusty Black Straw Hats, put a kettle of water on a gas stove or over a good fire, and when it boils hold the hat in front of the spout, shake gently, and move the hat about so that all over the straw gets the steam. It removes all dust and makes the hat quite fresh. Artificial flowers can be freshened in tLc same way. The kettle of water must bo kept boiling fast during the proiess. Rhubarb and Orange Jam. Take equal quantities of rhubarb and, preserving sugar, and to every pound of fruit allow two sweet oranges. Cut rhubarb into inch lengths, grate the rind of the oranges very fine, being careful to re- move all white pith, cut fleshy part up thinly, as if for marmalade; put all in preserving pan, brinpr gently to the boil and then boil quickly for 40 minutes. Pour into pots, and tie down when cold. CAKES AND PUDDINGS —No. 20. A good substantial and perfectly harmless Cake is made from the fol lowing:- BUNLOAF. 1 packet of Cakeoma. 5 ozs. of Butter or Lard. 4 Eggs. 1 lb. Currants. 1 lb. Raisins. 4 ozs. Candied Peel. 3 or 4 tablespoonfuls of Milk. Method. Rub, the butter or lard into the Cakooma. until it is as fine as breadcrumbs. Beat the eggs, and with the milk add them to the prev- ious ingredients, and lightly mix; then add the fruits, etc, and again mix lightly but thorough- ly, and bake in a moderately warm oven. Plain Gingerbread recipe next week. Cakeoma is sold only in 3jd. packets by Grocers and Stores everywhere.

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HER VENGEANCE