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POLITICAL GOSSIP IN MERIONETHSHIRE.

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POLITICAL GOSSIP IN MERIONETHSHIRE. (From a Correspondent.) The Conservative meeting at Corwen was a cau- tion in more ways than one, for it revealed Tory tricks most unblushingly. The Hon. Charles wished all his tenants to vote for Col. Tottenham" (according to the colonel), and was not going to leave the county until the election was over. Such a wish is a degradation—if not a menace the colonel's repetition of it is an insult and an impertinence. The Honourable Charles has just as much right to wish' his tenants to eat pork, if it disagreed with their stomachs, or to drink brandy if they are pledged teetotalers, as to wish' them to vote for a candidate whose political convictions are an offence to their principles. And the Hon. Charles is not going to confine his interest to mere wishes. He will not move from the county until the election is over." The mother of Tony Lumpkin, in bewailing the shortcomings of her hopeful son, said: Did I not prescribe for you every day, and weep while the receipt was operating?" The Hon. Charles, like Mrs Hardcastle, is going to watch the effect of his prescriptions, but it remains to be seen whether his tenants will make Tony Lumpkins of themselves. According to Colonel Tottenham they will, for he boasts of a majority of sixty-two promises in Corwen. In the light of the Hon. Charles's wishing and waiting it is not hard to dis- cover how this majority is attained, and if the prescrip- tions are swallowed there will be weeping on Saturday Mr Whalley is a Widdle' the Right Hon. Lord Dun- dreary himself would find it hard to unravel. Punch calls him Whalley the Wise if all that has been said about him this week is true, some will rather call him Whalley the Whiffler. Until he unravels the mystery it will be unfair to form an opinion, but here are extracts from a couple of speeches delivered during the past week- BII Col. Tottenham at Corwen. I mentioned at the meeting we had this day week that Mr Whalley, with whom I had had some differences on railway matters, had come up to me on the previous Tuesday, and regretted much that he had no vote for the county, but assured me that as a magistrate of this county, he would be most happy to give me every assist- ance- that he would attend meetings or do anything I wished to assist me. Mr Whalley sent me a letter yes- terday to say that "I am called to Peterborough on Friday, and therefore cannot attend at Corwen or Bala; but have no hesitation in repeating what I stated in conversation with you at Llangollen, viz., that if a conservative is to be returned for Merionethshire, no one could, in my opinion, render greater service to the county at the present juncture than yourself." He also states that Mr Holland's address is not satisfactory to him as evi- dencing his claim to represent a Welsh county as a liberal. Mr Whalley dislikes Mr Glad- stone, and considers him a dangerous man. By Mr Jones, Vron, chair- man of Liberal Meeting, at Bala. In opening the procedings, the CHAIRMAN intimated that he had no intention of occupy- ing the time of the meeting in any preliminary remarks he felt that none were needed, as his opinions and sentiments had already been heard by the electors of Bala upon many occasions. A letter had been addressed to him by Mr Whalley, whose name, as they were aware, had been very freely used by the tories, and especially in the neighbour- hood of Bala, in which Mr Whalley distinctly stated that the conservatives had no authority for the use of his name, and that it had been done entirely without his authority or cognizance. Mr Whalley had sent special mes- sages from Ruabon to explain that he was a liberal at heart, and that, as such, he would not support or lend his interest to the candidature of Colonel Tottenham; he would support Mr Holland. Now no one doubts the word of Colonel Tottenham, for he is a gentleman. On the other hand, no one doubts that of Mr Jones, for he is a gentleman too The question is, What did Mr Whalley write to these two gentlemen ? The public naturally ask that both letters should appear in the papers. This will only be just to Mr Whalley, for there must be a misapprehension somewhere. Amongst the incidents of the election has been men- tioned a donation of 2800 from a gallant officer towards the Conservative opposition, which has reminded the public of the old adage concerning the class that is soon parted from its money. It is gratifying to know that no such sum has been so foolishly offered. Perhaps the same may be said of the C500 said to be subscribed by Lord Penrhyn, and the ditto from Sir Watkin, although the latter has a stake-that is, property-in the county, and the rumour is that his money is given conditionally that his party goes to the poll. Colonel Tottenham, in a rather qualified jinanner, pooh-poohs monetary assistance altogether. The nomination came off on Wednesday, when your correspondent took his place in the crowd below the hus- tings, in a good place to catch the drops of eloquence from above. The High Sheriff, in his toga, looked like a Tribune, and said what he had to say in a manly straightforward manner, cheered by all. Mr Jones, of Vron, in nominating Mr Holland, charged vigorously on the tories and dared them to say that they had not confessed to admitting the struggle was a hopeless one. They answered by a laugh -a laugh, as Mr Jones remarked, that would be repeated on the other side of their mouths on Saturday. Mr Casson was very brief as a seconder. Then Mr Oakley stepped to the front to propose Colonel Tottenham, and gave as his first recommendation of the tory candidate his services in carrying a line of railway from Denbighshire. The people became impatient. They were dull enough not to see what selling land for a railway had to do with voting on imperial questions in Parliament. But Mr Oakley had nothing better to offer them and gave place to Captain Thomas, of Talsarnau. The people jeered and the captain lost his temper, his head of course following. Then came a scene. A manuscript was brought hastily out of the captain's pocket by the captain's hand, and the captain's tongue rolled forth the following magniloquent sentence; "I believe Colonel Tottenham is well qualified, and will faith- fully represent the principles of true and enlightened conserva- tism in the maintenance of our old constitution, which secures to every British subject full and equal liberty." This coming from a Tory was too much, and the crowd fairly yelled. This blessed Old Constitution's notions of 'free and equaf liberty' until recently included com- pulsory church rates on Dissenters it once included a denial of simple justice to all religions not within the pale of the Church it even denied to the people a vote and would have denied all these just dues still but for the pressure of the Liberal party. Captain Thomas was re- commended to hand his speech to the reporters, to save time, but he persisted in reading and said nothing Mr Holland then gave an outline of his principles, similar in the main with the speeches of his already re- ported but Colonel Tottenham gave his Corwen speech almost to the letter. Your correspondent knows this be- cause he had the Oswestry Advertiser of that morning in hie hand and followed the colonel in his arguments (?). The colonel again aired the little jokewe all rememberin our juvenile days of a "man born in a stab'enot being a horse," and argued from this that although born in Dublin he was not an Irishman. But why should he not be an Irish- man ? The foolish Tories before they knew the colonel was coming forward, tried to fix the charge on Mr Holland and Colonel Tottenham very properly pointed out how Parliament had been enriched by Irish blood—though, by the way, he did not mention the newest importation, Mr Donovan Rossa, I During the speech of Col. Tottenham, and especially after he drew the illustration from Harlech Castle, which he had previously drawn from Chirk, the audience cried out for 'principles,' and suggested that as the day was cold they would rather hear what the colonel believed politically, than what he was socially. This brought him out on the ballot, which was, of course, un-English although "it would benefit the conservatives." The gallant colonel did not add-" at Corwen!" A little was said on taxes, in which the fact was ignored that although the liberals have to pay for the tory conduct of the Abys- sian war, Mr Lowe has generally reduced payments, and has every prospect of a budget that will be a grateful one to the nation. Education was good, but the Corwen illus- tration of education being a knife that would cut children unless tempered by theology, was again uttered; and no satisfactory answer was given to the query, What theology r We might have a wide mixture in a school under the protection of the 'dear old Church of England.' "The show of hands is all for the Dutchman—' No Irish need apply'for Merionethshire," said a Welshman when all was over. And so it was there was as large a majority for Mr Holland on Wednesday as there will be on Satur- day—when the news will be flashed all over England that toryism has had its final quietus in Merioneth. Dolgelley, Friday.

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EAST AND WEST.

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YSTUMTUEN.

ILLANILAR.

ABERDOVEY.

LLANDRILLO.

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THE NOMINATION.