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15 erthygl ar y dudalen hon

---------...,.---I14ORDAUNT…

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I 14ORDAUNT DIVORCE CASE. t,' I jSr the days fixed for the trial of the special jury I II Mordaunt v. Mordaunt, Cole, and Johnstone," I 0f the Court of Probate and Divorce were be- I A a crowd of curious strangers long before the I hour of sitting. The circumstances of the case I Jf known. In the summer of last year a petition I rented to the Judge Ordinary for dissolution of I h$e ky Sir Charles Mordaunt, Bart. Lady Mordaunt I t? &o plea, and it was soon known that the state of I was such as to make it matter of question I er she was in a state of mind as to be legally com- I .ta.ke such a step. The Judge Ordinary, there- I g reason to believe that the representations I h,911 this head were well-founded, directed a jury to I ^Helled to try the special issue of the sanity or IR- I the respondent, and this was the question ac- I now submitted to their decision. Mr Sergeant I r*^e, Q.c., Mr Stavely Hill, Q.C., Dr Spinks, I 'lI.d Mr Inderwick, appeared for the petitioner; Dr I J/' Q.C., Mr Arehbold, and Mr Searle for the respon- I and Mr Lord held a watching brief for one of the I ^°adents, Viscount Coks. The evidence is so I [^°us, that we cannot "even attempt & summary. I days were occupied is. bringing preof and counter I h. J8 to the alleged insanity of Lady Mordaunt, and I (6^ettune«.t physicians, including Sir'lames SirupsoR, I to show that her ladyship was insane. It was I n^ded on behalf of the petitioner that the madsess I but on Saiwrday morning Mr Serjeant Bal- I ifitimated that he should call ao evidence te con- I k that which had described. Lady Mordfttint as I Present of unsound mind, The substantial ques- I 3*ch he wished to be put te the jury was whether I J^yship was not, within a reasonable period <after the I to ^he citation, in a fit state of mind to instruct her I L?0^. Witnesses were called to prove the'charges of I T, and one of the most important of these was I Ce, Clarke, lady's maid to *he respondent. I general interest is felt in the case th*t we suppose I ^cessary to give some of the evident. I wpharles Mordaunt, examined by Sergeant Ballantine: I the original petitioner in this case. My marriage I the respondent took glace at Perth in 1866, with the I 'lection of both families. I made a settlement of I LT?up°n my wife. Nothing occurred to disturb my I ftT011 her up to the very moment of my discovery I fe? Host painful circumstances whioh are now being in- I |?Sated. TJp to that time my happiness in her was I Plete, I sought t«-consult her wishes in every possible I I put no restraint upon her, but allowed her to re- I Wher acquaintances. I heard her speak of Captain I t^tUbar, Lord Cole, and Sir F. Johnstone as old friends I family; and I therefore received them into -the I 'i?f my acquaintance. At Lady Mordaunt's instiga- I invited bir Frederick Johnstone to Walton. ^Mr I ^nt Ballanti*e Were you a)so aware that the Prince ■ was an acquaintance of. your wife's ?—Witness I believe you had no personal acquaintance with ■ r^yal highness ?—I cannot sey that I knew hici well. ■ Spoken to him. He was never a friend of mine. I I 3^'that he wes on visiting terms with my wife's family. I .)p he ever come to your -house on your invitation ? ■ er.-Did you ever have a conversation wfah your ■ ut him ? Did you ever express a desire that your I should have no relations with him?—t did. I I her against continuing her acquaintance with him. I l>enaanc.e: Te^ us what you said.—Sir Charles I iJ^aunt: I said I had hesrd in various quarters certain I C?8tances connected with his previous character which I (jN- me to make that remark. I did not -enter into full I rs.-Sergeant Ballantine: At the 3time you ex- I ^at desire to Lady Mordaunt, had he, to your I &e> been at your house on one or two occasions ?— I L^et saw him but onoe. It was after that I expressed ■ W desire.—Were you in Parliament at the time ?—I re- ■ l^'ited the southern division of Warwickshire for nine ■ luj^JJitil the last dissolution of Parliament.—Were you ■ 1L aware of the fact until after your wife's confinement I ^nce Wales had been a constant visitor at ■ ^'Uouse?—I was not.—Were you aware before your I ^j that she had received, letters from the ■ of Wales, and written to him after your marriage ? I n°k I cannot recollect havimg-seen any letters.— H Penzance: Did you know, no icatter from what ■ > that there was any correspondence, however in- I or trifling, going on between your wife and the ■ of Wales'!—Sir C. Mordaunt; No, I knew of none. ■ J^eant Ballantine And, supposing the Prince of ■ s had been at your house uj?cn several occasions ■ (L1 you were attending to your duties in the House of ■ l^^ions, or elsewhere, were yon acquainted with the ■ -The Petitioner: I was -ot-Lord Penzance: Ex- ■ once, when you saw his royal highness, were you ■ C\t Acquainted with the fact that he ever called?—Sir ■ Wdaunt: I had heard that he called, but I never I tjh him.—Sergeant Ballantine: you hear that he I Or frequently ?—Sir C. Mordaant: No; but I heard I Called occasionally. It was mentioned to me by a ■ taction of the family. I spoke to Lady Mordaunt on I Object after I had received that communication. ■ t ^as occasion I have naeistioned I ^the third day after her couf nement, said the peti- I s^e sa^ tome—" Charii^. I have deceived you I lw not the father of my child." At that time I be- I • the observation must have been made owing to H illness which might naturally accompany her con- ■ y^eat. Subsequently she repeated the remark, and, I 1 saw no indication of her mind wandering, I did On e"eve what she said, as I had full confidence in her. I ^h of May, when she was quite composed, but I W^x^d' she said, Charlie, you are not the father of H c child; Lord Cole is.the father of the child, and I my- I W 4111 the cause of its blindness. She did not speak H for a quarter of an hour, when she said, Charley, ■ fa|rve been very wicked. I keve done very wrong." I fc, Whom with ?" She said, "With Lord Cole, and H Frederick Johnstone, an £ the Prince of Wales, and others, often, and in openicay." (Sensation.) WTien I ljv^Said this there was nothing to indicate that she was Cer any delusion. She spoke as though remorse had her. I made no reply. I was much distressed.— ■ Penzance: Did you b^aere what she said?—Sir C. uQfdannt: I cannot say that I believed her at that time. Wa suspicions had not been .-thoroughly aroused. Never ■ a suggestion of her being insane until Sir Thomas "cOllcrieff came to Walton un saw her for three minutes. H 4 towexanurked by Dr Deace: When he left home for I Jj^'ay he understood that Lord Cole was paying his 6h esses to Lady Mordaunt-e sister, and was, in fact, 1-to her; but that• hisi'Iather's consent could not K. obtained. It was in the ,-year 1868 that he saw the of Wales in his house. He was lying on the sofa, ■ the witness Bird camenpstain ana said the Prince J ^ales was in the house,'and witness went down and his royal highness. H kj the court adjourning, L-ord Penzance said be had B it intimated to him that the Prince of Wales, had H 1\ subpoenaed on behali.cfr- £ ir Charles Mordaunt. He t it¡, °ttght they should in some-way consult his convenience ^tending. ^■hv^^rgeant Ballantine said lha& he was consulted as to the ■ ppriety of doing so, but.he wes not in favour of it; and H ^.foyal highness he did not Relieve was subpoenaed. ■I Penzance said then he must have been misin- ,-h^t la right to say that the letters which the Birmingham t>rj?' and other papers ha*e published as those of the of Wales's are all harmless enough. The following ete some of them ■ Sandringham^Xa?g's Lynn, January 13, 1867. I *HY DE^R LADY MORDAUNT, am quite shocked never to tK Ve answered your kind letter,^written some time ago. and for H »v?e Very pretty muffatees, which are very useful this cold H hither' I had no idea where you had been staying since your vwfTiage • bnt Francis Knollys- told me that you are in War- (^ckslure" I suppose you will be np in London for the opening parliament, when I hope I may perhaps have the pleasure of y0u, and of making the acquaintance of Sir Charles. I H ,H 48 in London for only two nighty and returned here on Satur- ■ a?y. The rails were so slippery that we thought we never ■ arrive here. There has been a heavy fall of snow here, J1*! vvte are able to use our sledgest which is capital fun.—Believe ■ Souys ever sincerely, ALBERT EDWARD. Monday. V^' ^DEAR LADY MORDAUNT,—I «M sure you will be glad to the Princess was safely delivered of a little girl this 0niin>r and that both are doing very well. I hope you will ■ >e,to the Oswald and St. James's Hall this week. There da °Uld.^ am sure, be no harm your reanaining till Saturday in 'j f»ha.n like to see you again.—E»er yours most sincerely, ALBERT EDWARD. MarlboroBgh House, May 7,1867. H My LADY MORDAUNT,—Many thanks for your letter, i am very sorrv that I should haw given you so much H '^uble looking for the ladies' umbrella for me at Paris. I am glad ;io hear that you enjoyed your stay there. I shall be P0»ng thete on Friday next, and as the Princess is so much 5etter Jiope to remain a week there. If there is any corn- el elusion I can do for you there it will give me the greatest ?[easure to earry it out. I regret very much not to have been > to call nyon you since your return, bnt hope to do so when LCoHe back froyi Paris, and have an opportunity of making the ^Uaintance of your husband.—Believe me yours very sincerely, ALBERT EDWARD. ■ Marlborough-house, Oct. 13. Jy DEAR Last MORDAUNT,— Many thanks for your kind letter, *hich I received Just before we left Dunrobin, and il have been m ^usy here that I have been unable to answer it before. I am to hear that yo(i are flourishing at Walton, and hope your H SN-tnd has had good sport with the partridges. We had a turning stay at -.Duprobin-from September 19thito the 7th of IS month. Our party consisted of the Sandwich Grosvenors ^ily for a few days), Sumners, Bakers, F. MarshalL Alrud, fionald Gower, Sir H, J1 illy Oliver, who did not look so bad in a ^■^Ut as you heard Lascelles, Falkiner, and Sam Backley, who to^ked flrst-rate in his kiflt. I was also three or four days in the H ?^eay Forest, with the Grosvenors. I shot four stags. My total twenty-one. P. John thanks you very much for your photo; and ■i received two very good ones, accompanied by a chanming H^lstle from your sister. We are all delighted at Hamilton's ^■^arriage and I think you are rather hard on the young lady, as, ^Uough' not exactly pretty, she is very nice-looking, has fl'aigauicr manners, and is very popular with everyone. Frem letter he seems to be very much in love—a rare occurrence t °*-&-days. I will see what I can do in getting a presentation s°r the son of Mrs Bradshaw for the Royal Asylum of London, Ana's Society. Francis will tell you the result. London ie *ory empty, but I have plenty to do, so time does not go slowly, H I g0 down shooting to Windsor and Richmond occasionally. Hp the 2&lh I shall shoot with General Hall at Newmarket, the H Rowing week at Knowsley, and then at Windsor and Sand- r^hamhefore we go abroad. This wiil be probably on the 18th 19th of nejet month. You told me when I last saw you that were probably going to Paris in November, but I suppose ^■f°U have given it up. I saw in the papers that you were in ^iclon on Saturday. I wish you had let i»e know, as I would made a point of calling. There are some good plays going and we are going the round of them. My brother is here, ™Jt at the end of the month he starts for Plymouth on his long Puise of nearly two years. Now I shall say gopd-bye, and ^■?°Ping that piobably we may have a chance of seeing you "e'ore we leave, I remain, yours most sincerely, ALBERT EDWARD. The evidence for the petitioner in the Mordaunt .divorce ^H^e was resumed on Wednesday, when the witnesses §*lled- were Mr and Mrs Herbert Murray, Florence Stephens, the cook at Walton Hall, Mr Orford and Mr surgeons, and Dr Tyler Smith. The medicaA ^^B^timony went to show that whatever may have been the of Lady Monlaunt's health y/h^u the citation was served upon her, she was not at present in her rig:1:.iï mind. Shortly before three o'clock in the afternoon, and ^heh the case for the petitioner had closed, Dr Deane said two names had been intwdW^d pro- minently into the case, one being the Ptintte 'ot Walea, whom he proposed to call. The other name Was that of Sir F. Johnstone, with whom had been xj^Mccted a hideous story, and he proposed tc <all hii £ His Royal Highness the Priitf e of Wales "then entered the court from a private rooia behind thfe bioneh, and, on stepping into the witness-fed^aS sWorn. Before he proceeded to gi\*fc evidence, Lerd Penzance ssi& ufe thought it his duty to call the attention of his royal highness to the jt of last session by which it was provided that a person accused of adultery was not obliged to submit himself tc interrogatories on the -Subject. The Prince of Wales, examined by Dr Deane, said—I have been. for some years acquainted with the Moncrieflf family. t knew Lady Mordaunt before her marriage. I wrote to her and made heir a present on her marriage. Before her marriage she visited at Marlborough House, and she has been to tfefe theatre with myself and the princess. In 1867 and 1868 I saw her frequently. I was acquainted with Sir Charles Mordaunt. I have often met llim with Lady Mordhunt. On one occasion at a. pigeon match at Hurlingham, in June, 1868, I and Sir Charles were the captains for two counties—Warwickshire and Norfolk. Lady Mordaunt scored for both sides. I spoke to her at times when Sir Charles was by. I believe I use hansom cabs ccoasionally. Dr Deane—Has there ever been any imprperfamiliarity or criminal act between yourself and Lady Mordaunt ? The Prince of Wales—There has not. (Applause.) Mr Serjeant Ballantine-I have no question to ask his royal highness. His royal highness then left the court, amidst some applause. Sir F. Johnstone, having had his attention called to the act of last year, was examined by Dr Deane, and said—I have been acquainted with Lady Mordaunt's family many years, In December, 1868, I dined with her at the Alex- andre; Hotel alone. Mr Forbes told me she WAS in town. I get there about eight, and left about twelve. We Were in the sitting room. 'From first to last, has there been any fatniarity or im- proper intercourse between you and Lady Mordatint?— Certainly not. The statement that I was suffering from disease is utterly untrue.. Cross-examined by Serjeant Ballantine I was not suffering at this time, nor for many years previously. I did not know it was to fee a tête-a-têt interview. We were in the sitting room. It was furnished as sitting rooms generally are. I hafi no business relations with Lady Mordaunt. Dr Deane said that was his case. Lord Penzance said before Serjeant Ballantine addressed the jury he wished to observe that certain'letters had been put in and not read. He thought the letters of the Prince of Wales ought to be vead. Dr Deane remarked that there was a course taken with respect to those letters to which ke-ought to call attention, though it might be unimportant. The letters were put in but were not read, yet they all made "their appeararce in the next morning's papers. Mr Serjeant Ballantine-A most'improper proceeding. Lord Penzanee-Most improper. Mr Serjeant Ballantine-And one which I am totally unable to account for. I was never more surprised in my life. In truth, I had intended to refer to one of them for a date, but it was not my intention to read them. Lord Penzance—They could 'not have been procured from the officers of the court;; rthey therefore must have been procured from some other party. It was a great act of impropriety, and I very much doubted whether the court should not take notice of it as contempt of court. The great impropriety consisted in publishing them then it is proper that they should be read now. The letters of the Prince of Wales to Lady Mordaunt were then read. The proceedings in the Mordauht divorce case on Thursday consisted entirely of counsels' speeches, Mr Serjeant Ballantine having addressed the jury for the petitioner, and Dr Deane for the respondent. Lord Penzance stated that the questions which he would sub- mit to the jury were-First, whether the respondent, Lady Mordaunt, was on the 30th of April in such a condition as to be enabled to answer the allegations of the petition, and duly to instruct her solicitor for her defence and, secondly, if she was in such a condition, did she at any, and at what time afterwards, cease to be so. The learned judge would sum up yesterday.

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