Symud i'r prif gynnwys
Cuddio Rhestr Erthyglau

16 erthygl ar y dudalen hon

Advertising

I-----ITHE PROGRESS OF THE…

Newyddion
Dyfynnu
Rhannu

THE PROGRESS OF THE AUTUMN SESSION. PARLIAMENT has now been in Session since Tharsday, the 23rd, and what has it done ? It was talked,and so has many assemblage of old women, but it has done very little else It has convened for a special purpose, and it met with a definite object in view. But! instead of devoting itself to the effecting of that purpose and to the attaining of that object, its time has been frittered away by I frivolous questions, and by angry recrimin- ations. The address to the CROWN was moved on the day of the opening of Parlia. ment, and the debate upon it, if it is worthy of being called a debate, has occupied the attention of the House and consumed its time up till now. lvhat might have been well and completely done in two sittings has taken seven. In addition to the obstruct. ion caused by the Tories, there has been that of the Irish party. There has been vulgar abuse from the one, and an insult to the majesty of justice from the other. Lord RANDOLPH CHURCHILL has used the vilest of language, and given utterance to the most unscrupulous expressions with regard to the PRESIDENT OF THE BOARD OF TRADE, He has offered himself as a candidate at the next general election for Birmingham, which is now represented by three Liberal members, and with the view of furthering his candi- dature and of advancing his interests in a, political point of view, he paid a visit to Birmingham a little more than a fortnight ago, when the riot took place at Aston, which has now become historic. To the noble lord the very mention of that intent- ional insult is grevious, and its remembrance is intolerable. He has abandoned Wood- stock, which he now represents, and has attempted to woo the great Midland capital, and it may be that the House of Commons will be eased of his presence, and with him, of that vulgar abuse and that manifestation of coarse impudence which have characterized his entire parliamentary career. The mem- ber for Portsmouth, his satellite, and one of the three who think and act with him, has lent him very valuable assistance in the attacks which have been made. That was to be expected, but it was hardly to be expected that a respectable Tory like Mr CHAPLIN would have joined the reckless crew. Yet he did so, and even seemed to revel in his degrading employment. Not only have the riots at Aston furnished material for Tory spite to vent itself upon, but even some of the! events which transpired during Mr GLAD- STO;" S journey to Midlothian have been called into requisition. On Monday evening Lord RANDOLPH CHURCHILL asked the President of the Board of Trade if his de- partment had taken any action to prevent the public frum bc-in,, inconvenienced by, political demonstrations at Hail way Stations, The answer to this question was that the Board of Trade had no authority or eoiitiol over the arrangements which way be made for preserving order in railway stations, and! that the railway companies were thernselves capable of protecting the public If Lordj RANDOLPH CHURCHILL had cared even one' iota about the convenience of the public at 1 railway stations the matter would have been very different, but his real object was to annoy the Liberal leaders and to parade himself. To effect either of these objects he will not even shrink from inconveniencing himself. But the end of Aston riots has not yet been reached, they have afforded a new opportunity for Tory obstruction and have been seized upon by Lord HANDOLKI for another display in the House Jommons. He has aetua elevated than into a subject which is deemed worthy of forming a matter for an amendment to the address. On Thursday Lord RANDOLPH CHURCHILL moved the following amendment:—"Arm we humbly assure your Majesty that we regret to find in recent speeches and the action of one of your Majesty's Ministers, holding the high office of President of the Board of Trade, an incitement to an inter- ference with the freedom of political dis- cussion and a justification of riot and dis- disorder." In support of the amendment the noble lord referred to certain passages in three of Mr. CHAMBERLAIN'S latest speeches—one he delivered in Birmingham on the 4th of Au- gust, the second at Ilanley, and the third at Newtown. Upon these he founded his general indictment. His particular accusation was that Mr. CHAMBERLAIN1 wa; responsible for the Birmingham riots. Mr CHAMHER- LAIN'S reply was a crushing one. After an ex- citing debate, the amendment was negatived by 214 votes against 17b—a majority of ;36 over the combined Tory and Parnellite forces. Toryism may profess as much as it likes that it is in favour of the Franchise Bill and the extension of the Franchise to the country labourers, but no one can give credence to the profession. The very fact of the moving of such an amendment to the address is a clear proof of the non-existence of iny desire to see the consummation of that whch is the real object of the Autumn Session. The transcendent ability of the PniMF. MimaTER and the unfaltering loyalty of his followers constitute the only antidote to those baneful and weary outpourings of the vials of Tory wrath which seem to form the stock-in-trade of a majority of those members who sit upon the Opposition benches. It is to be hoped that the House of Commons will now settle down to its realiwork and that in the early part of the week after next the Franchise Bill will make its second adveut into the House of Lords, into that painted hall where pageantry is enshrined and where stupidity oiten slumbers. By the side of the Franchise Bill Nemesis will stalk in secret, in silence, and there will she calmly watch its fate, waiting to punish, ready to strike and eager to let loose the dogs of war. The nations will be on the alert, and many an anxious thought will be turned to the painted chamber, and its fossilized members, when the crisis is being neared. What will the Lords do ? is a question which is asked more than a million times every day. That question will increase in importance and it will grow to a magnitude which will transcend all other considerations. The passing of the Bill by the Lords will give them a new lease of political life and they will be fools if they are unable to realize their position and grasp at the conditions for continued existence. On the other hand if they reject it, then a storm of righteous indignation will be aroused against them which will grow in intensity and increase in might until like an angry soa it shall sweep their house away so that its name shall never again find a place in the anr als of the nation.

! IloÜs anh Smwim'n l I—

[No title]

[No title]

[No title]

[No title]

[No title]

[No title]

THE WATER SUPPLY.

LLANASA.

ST. ASAPH. -

Family Notices

Advertising

----------.--------MISCELLANEOUS.…

-----------! RHYL PETTY SESSIONS.