Symud i'r prif gynnwys
Cuddio Rhestr Erthyglau

9 erthygl ar y dudalen hon

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PACTS AND FANCIES.

Newyddion
Dyfynnu
Rhannu

PACTS AND FANCIES. EDIBLE SEAWEEDS. There are at least two seaweeds common on our shore that are good to eat. The first is the Irish moss, or carrageen. It is a red weed, though occasionally tinged with green, and may be known by its forked and fan- shaped fronds, slightly resembling the antlers of a deer. It is found in deep, sheltered pools, and when boited yields a colourless jelly, which doctors often prescribe for invalids. The other edible seaweed is the dulse, or dillisk, commonest on the Scotch and Irish coasts, but also found on English shores. It is a red, membraneous weed, with broad, fleshy fronds, from which project lobes, or fingers." Dulse is a staple article of diet with many of the Scottish and Irish fisherfolk. There is, of course, seakale, the sprouts of which, cooked after the manner of celery, make an excellent dish. Seakale, however, is not a seaweed, but a perennial plant growing on the seashores. n THE BLARNEY STONE. Visitors to Southern Ireland should on no account miss the Blarney Stone. As the train from the North approaches Cork, the tower, which is practically all that is left of Blarney Castle, may plainly be seen, and the magic triangular stone is situated near the top of this tower. The tradition is that all who kiss the stone will be endowed with the power to "blar- ney," or to humbug with wheedling talk, so as to gain a desired end. Again, they will have exceptional facility in the art of flattery and compliment. The gaining of this wonder- ful power sounds very easy of attainment on first hearing of it, but ir reality the aspirant is faced with a physical difficulty. To reach the stone one must be held by the heels and lowered face downwards till one's face reaches the kissing level-no easy task by any means. The legend dates from the time of Queen Elizabeth, when the Lord of Blarney very effectively made empty promises of surrender and plausible excuses.

NOSE-RUBBING.

WHEN A PRINCE PAWNED HIS WATCH.

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DRESSMAKING AT HOME.

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DRESSMAKING AT HOME.