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Cuddio Rhestr Erthyglau

8 erthygl ar y dudalen hon

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IWOMAN'S REALM.I

Newyddion
Dyfynnu
Rhannu

I WOMAN'S REALM. I DRES5 — FASHION — H0M3 I THE DIGNITY OF HOUSEWORK. Some twenty years ago, wlien I was an enthusiastic beginner in the art of home- 1 making, says a writer in the Girl's Own j Paper, I had my first experience with the J emancipators and their propaganda for undermining the morale of those of us who are so old-fashioned as to follow a career of domesticity. The present-day atmosphere is charged with anti-domestic argumentation, often I crude and blunt as in this instance, often cleverly subtle. Always the aim is to con- vince the home-maker that she is wasting herself upon the insignificant details of life. She is warned of the constant mechani- cal repetition of monotonous duties that cause her very soul to revolt, until only the sternest sense of duty holds her to the deadening daily grind. Yet, now, considering absolutely nothing but my own welfare—I vote for the grind. I It is not a matter of economy with me at the present time—it is a matter of self- respect. I never like myself so well as when I am doing my own housework. A SMART CAPB-COAT. The popular garment depicted in 'the sketch is made of green and grey plaid, with gathered waist effect and pointed sides. There is fancy stitshery on the collar. The cape-coat is surmounted by a j very elegant feather toque. The shape of I PATTERN No. 2,450. I the collar and the hanging sleeves .9 par- ticularly novel; otherwise there is a plain- ness about the whole that adds to its chic. It hangs rather full around the figure, and entirely covers the frock worn beneath. There are many examples of these capes on the market at the moment, but none more elegant than the one pictured here. BLOUSES-AND BLOUSES We shall wear our beloved blouses in any of the materials which are especially adapted for summer days, says an expert in the Woman at Home. Georgette and ninon trimmed with Valenciennes are smart and practical; fine lawn inset and trimmed with Irish crochet has an air of distinction peculiarly its own; crepe-de- chine in all colours offers itself to the votary of blouses; lace over tissue is suit- able for theatre wear. The country girl Cfton remain faithful to her severely simple linen blouses, the artistic girl can revel in the Indian silk handkerchief-blouse, but for golfing, and hockey the blouse is eclipsed by the soft flannel shirt with its workman-like pearl buttons. There are patterns available for every description of blouse, so no girl need go blouseless, or plead that she cannot afford one. She will probably iiot be able to in- I dulge in the model shop blouse at eight or nine guineas, but she can easily make a I model blouse at home. SUIT FOR A SMALL BOY. The picture illustrates a most fascinat- ing suit for a little boy. The knickers are I composed of black satin; and thp dRi..t" little blouse is of spotted muslin, with I PATTERN No. 2,451. I frills at collar and cuffs of the kind known as "Toby"—only slightly modified. The little lacing in the front is a pretty touch, adding much to its artistic value. There is a sllit pocket in the knickers that is sure to please the small man. j TO-DAY'S RECIPE. I POTATO RISSOLES.—Press one and a- half cup of mashed potatoes through a sieve, and season with a tablespoonful of butter, salt, cayenne, and celery salt, and add either one-fourth teaspoonful of onion j juice with one teaspoonful of minced pars- lev or three tablesDOOufuls of crater! juice with one teaspoonful of minced pars- lev or three tablesDOOufuls of era.f.-tl

NEWS IN A NUTSHELL.!

r HOW TO OBTAIN THE PATTERN.

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IWOMAN'S REALM.I