Cuddio Rhestr Erthyglau

31 erthygl ar y dudalen hon

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. A CONVENIENT TIME FOR LIMING.

HOW THE LUNGS BECOME DISEASED.

START PIGS WELL.

Newtown's Opportunity.

CHOICE OF A BOAR.

Newyddion
Dyfynnu
Rhannu

CHOICE OF A BOAR. Size is a point of considerable importance in a boar, but coarseness at any point should be carefully avoided. This characteristic is particularly objectionable when it shows itself in the form of an over-loaded shoulder. A sufficiency of bone to carry the weight of the body is, of course, a prime essential, but too much bone must be avoided, as it is invariably indicative of a tendency to the production of an inferior class of meat. Another point that should be aimed is a fine, silky coat of hair, and plenty of it. Many of the pigs to be met with are sadly deficient in this respect. The possession by a pig of a coat of the correct texture may always be counted upon as an accompaniment of good quality of meat. Pigs which are deficient in hair are usually of too fat a type to command the top price of the market, whereas, on the other hand, pigs which have very strong, bristly hair, are notorious for the production of a coarse quality of meat, which, like that containing too much fat, never brings the top price of the market. In the ordinary course, animals intended for being kept for use as boars are separated from their dams at the same time as other members of the litter. It is possible that by leaving them with their dams some little time longer than the six or seven weeks usually allowed, such animals might benefit somewhat, but experience goes to show that there is really no necessity for such exceptional treatment. Neither is there any great necessity for exceptional treat- ment in the matter of feeding such animals, for the food usually given to pigs kept for bacon- producing purposes will also be found very suitable for animals intended for breeding pur- poses. If anything, such foods err on the side of being too rich, and calculated to put on too much condition. A good food combination for young boars between the time of weaning and the age when they are first put to service- say, eight or ten months-is a mixture of grain foods consisting of crushed oats and maize meal, in the proportion of two to one, given along with potatoes or kitchen scraps, and, whenever I separated milk can be spared, worked into a soft mashewith that liquid. CAUSES OF SCOUR IN SHEEP. Scour in sheep is not always due to excess of nitrogen, but to immature roots containing some principle which is prejudical. When the cake allowance is light suspicion should always be placed on the condition of the roots, though mouldy cake may be the cause. Apart from unripeness in roots, there are other conditions which cause scour, such as decay from mildew, not from frost; or bitter principle from exces- sively caukered roots, whether it be from finger-and-toe or from grub in the skin found m I in the galls caused by the little By Anthomjrlz brassiere. Wherever this is the case the supply of roots should be lessened, and it is better to move the sheep to a sounder crop, but sweet and sound food, whether it be hay, cake, or corn, should be given. The causes of scour are rarely far to seek when the sheep are on roots. The good autumn this year should do much to produce sound roots. Those who have a good supply ot cabbages through autumn rarely get much scour, because cabbages are excellent food. Moreover, swedes are not then so often fed in an immature state. Beans and undecorticated cotton cake are useful to stop scour when it does not come from too much nitrogenous food. It is important in sheep feeding not to give cake in too big lumps, and especially so if there is intestinal trouble. It is always wasteful to give it in big lumps, but when the bowels are in an excited condition the trouble is aggra- vated. Any piece bigger than a bean is an unnatural size for sheep, for a sheep meets with no corn that size in nature, and its digestive organs are not meant to deal with hard sub- stances.

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CATTLE-FEEDING EXPERIMENTS…

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QUERIES ANSWERED.

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ROOTS NOT ENOUGH.

TRANSPLANTING FRUIT BUSHES.

The Question of Health.

CROOKED BREASTS.

TURKEYS FOR CHRISTMAS.

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zC14 FOR AN APPLE.

"KEPT" EGGS.

PEN POINTS.

THE CHOICE OF A CAREER.

tteath Sentence Scene.

The Late Dr. Bannister.

BWLCHYFFRIDD.'

CHURCHSTOKE.

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CATTLE-FEEDING EXPERIMENTS…

TRANSPLANTING FRUIT BUSHES.

TURKEYS FOR CHRISTMAS.

CATTLE-FEEDING EXPERIMENTS…