Cuddio Rhestr Erthyglau

18 erthygl ar y dudalen hon

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--I CYCLECAR AND MOTOR CYCLE…

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Farmers and Poiltios. I

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.PROFITABLE POULTRY CULTURE.

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IACROSS THE TABLE. I

Newyddion
Dyfynnu
Rhannu

I ACROSS THE TABLE. I The death of the Duke of Argyll brings tftw amnber of widows in the immediate RoyaE circle up to five-rather a curious fact when* one remembers that there are no widowers in the list. Of Queen Victoria's children, the- two daughters now surviving—Princess Louise and Princess Beatrice—are both widowed,, while another case is supplied by a daughter- in-law in the Duchess of Albany. Then there are Queen Alexandra and her eldest daughter, widowed by the death of the Duke of Fife. It is strange that the same thing was to be- observe"! in the last generation, for Queen Vieto" was a widow for forty years. Her eldest aughter, the Empress Frederick, was a witknv for thirteen years; the Queen's mother, the Duchess of Kent, had a very long widowhood; and there was also Queen Ade- laide, widow of William IV. The succession of the new Duke of Argyll adds another to the list of unmarried Dukes, the f,f: ler two being the Duke of St. Albans and j" Duke of Leinster. Some of those who are married have no heirs in the direct line: these include the Duke of Westminster, whose only son died some years ago, the Duke of Sutherland, the Duke of Newcastle, and the Duke of Somerset, apart from the Duk*- of Rothesay, who is the Prince of Wales. The marriage of one of the late Duke of' Argyll's brothers occasioned a classic in- stance of things which might have been ex- pressed differently." When the wedding was announced, says Grant Duff, a certain Duke remarked to the Prince of Wales: "What queer people Argyll's 'sons do marry to be sure," and received the laughing reply: "I am sorry you think so badly of my sister. "I had quite forgotten," said the offender, afterwards, "that Lome had married the Princess Louise." Anecdotes of the late Mr. Danckwerts con- tinue to be told in the Common Rooms. Here is one relating to his habit of resuming his seat whenever the Judges of the Divi- sional Court conferred together while he was arguing. Go on, Mr. Danckwerts. go on." sa,id the presiding Judge on one occasion. "Do I understand," asked the sarcastic ad- vocate, rising to his feet, that I am per- mitted to interrupt your Lordships' conver- sation ? t Ur. Danckwerts was never particularly concise in argument. I admit your skill, Danckwerts, very much, but you differ from me in one important particular," a leading advocate in the Commercial Court once re- marked to him. I choose my best point to rely upon, but you take your stand on all your points-good, bad, and 'indifferent." Quite right, my dear —— replied Mr.. Danckwerts, but you practise in the Com- mercial Court, where the Judges know some- thing of the law, while I practise chiefly in1 the Divisional Court, where I usually find my worst point to be the most successful." This is how the schoolboy did it when asked to explain the three creeds, says tho Daily Ohronicle: "First of all, there was the Apostles' Creed. But they found there were some people who didn't believe in that. So then they made the Nicene Creed. But there were still some people who wouldn't believe in that. So at last they made the Athanasian Creed, which nobody could possibly help be- lieving." In the United States the revenue auihorifciea have found that people deliberately over- assess their incomes in order to gain social prestige in the local plutocracy. This is reminiscent of Mark Twain's tale of the kind stranger who congratulated him on his books and asked him how much he made for such brilliant work. Mark was delighted, and let himself expand, and found out only in the next day or two that the polite stranger had carefully noted his statements, and, being a tax collector, had assessed him as he deserved. Fortunately the author had a knowing friend, to whom he took the terrible papers. The friend started making deductions," and by the time he had finished Mark Twain found that the United States owed him several hun- dred dollars, and that he really had no in- come at all. There is a barber in the hairdressing saloon of one of the great London railway stations who looks suspiciously at all customers who ask him for a particularly close shave, says the Daily Mail. Recently a man of a sport- ing type came into the saloon, sat down in his chair, and asked to be shaved. The expert handled his razor lightly and featly. But the sportsman put a ruminating hand under his chin, and Not close enough," he said. Carefully the barber lathered again and shaved his best and nearest. Good," said the patient, but not quite close enough yet. Just here and here there is a shadow of something left, and I must have it absolutely smooth for this evening." Then the barber bent over the chair and took the head into chancery. He scraped, he rubbed, he touched, he flicked, he hovered, he almost breathed with the razor. He practically leant upon his patient in the process, such pains did he take. At last he stepped aside; the sportsman now could have no more been shaved further than an egg. Quite right this time," said he as he rose from the chair. He pressed a sixpence into the barber's hand and hurried out. Ten minutes later the barber missed his watch and chain. No man has a better appreciation of effect than Mr. Roosevelt. He always lives up to his reputation as a strenuous man, but he was "had" once. A party of delegates called on him at his country home at Oyster Bay. The President being warned appeared to greet them coat.less, collarless, and apparently per- fpiring from recent physical labour. Mr. RooreVclt was, as usual, "delighted to see" them: "You've caught me hard at work put- ting my hay in the barn. gentleman," he a(lri(,d. ,Just come along there-with mo and tnIk as I work." and he led the way through the farmyard, picking up a pitchfork as he went along. But when they reached the barn and there was no hay on the floor, Roosevelt was perturbed. "John, John," he cried, "where's that hay?" And a vo;ce from the loft replied. Sorry, sir, but I ain't had time to throw it back again since you threw it up last time gentlemen called, sir." The do. putation smiled. A benevolent old gentleman went into a hosier's shop and asked to look at some ties for evening dress. The assistant produced made-up bows. My dear fellow," said the benevolent gentleman, "I want those I can tie myself. A ready-made bow makes one look like a sliop assistant." Then he realised the awful thing he had said and became abso- lutely «peechle.ss. He is still searching for the form of apology which would quite fit the occasion.

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REVIEWS. I

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SOOTH WORCESTERSHIRE. [

Ledbury Produoa Market.I

1,Ledbury Corn Market. I