Symud i'r prif gynnwys
Cuddio Rhestr Erthyglau

14 erthygl ar y dudalen hon

 ESNrML&S?V.

I -THE -BRITISH ARMY.

Newyddion
Dyfynnu
Rhannu

I THE BRITISH ARMY. HOW "TOMMY" IS LOOKED AFTER. SCOPE AND BRIGHT PROS- PECTS FOR YOUNG MEN. This is the first occasion on which any Government Department his ever used I popular advertising to make known its needs or its advanta'^s. The object of the ad- vertising i?? not. ?'tc?ethRr to aft recruits at the moment. As a matter of fact, M- ve :,t;ng at the pp???nt time is particularly good, but it is felt that comparatively speak- ing very few people Know anything about the ¡real conditions of life in the Army, or realise at all properly the manv advantages of the men in the rAnks of itis Majesty's Army. The main (hct of the advertising is therefore to tell in plain language ju?t what are the conditions of SOT vice in the Army. No man ever went through his term of service in the British Army without coming back to civilian life a better, .wronger, and shrewder man for.the experience. Hi3 daily discipline and round of duty breads charac- ter and a certain self-repression tiia-t is be- yond price to him when he comes out, time-expired," to resume civilian life. And arrangements are now made to help him to a good post of discharge. NO WORRIES. The sports, the drill, the open-air recrea- tions, the librar'es, 'he billiard rooms, the hundred and 0113 amusements, indoor and outdoor, in which th;< young soldier can in- dulge, make his life at least as ^^a-sant and enjoyable as the civilian's—and aiways it is healthier and more manly. There are no worries in a soldier's life. He is clothed, fed, housed, and looked after by the State— and all these things are done for him to- day so well that none can complain. there are nearly 1,200 officers on the ac tive list who havs riren from the ranks. The opportunities for promotion were never good as to-da.y. Th ere are the laurels foi distinguished conduct on active aervice. There ara the chances to see the remote cor- j TIers of our Empire—every man may vclun- I teor for service abroad. There are pros- pects in a hundred direction. SOME OF THE ADVANTAGES. Among tne many advantages of a soldier s life which will b, "atured in the advertise- ments are that he is a good class of man, for the average Tommy to-day is better educated, more temperate, more ambitious, more virile, and in every way more com. panionable than nis predecessor of ten and twenty years ago "? t.h? life ? largely an outdoor one; that he has ample leisure fur recreation of all sorts; that modern bar- racks have nearly all the advantages of a club; that the iocki is well cooked and plentiful; that there 1.l'e long holidays, and that the pay is good when it is remembered that the soldier has ,.<rovided for him free, his lodgings, rations and clothing.

ISWANSEA SCHEMES.I

"SWANSEA MENP" I.,

I" WHIJE ELEPHANT." I ,I

PLOUGHMAN'S 'DERBY.'

" LAND OF MY FATHERS.

.--i CENTURY AND A HALF OLD…

SENCHENYOD COLLIERY DISASTER

I SWANSEA MERCHANTS. ? CHANTS.I

—— 1. BLOW TO THE BILLj !

LLANELLY LAND DEAL

I" COMPELLEID TO SELL."

MR. JOHNNY JAMES.