Cuddio Rhestr Erthyglau

31 erthygl ar y dudalen hon

[No title]

Newyddion
Dyfynnu
Rhannu

The Allies, unfortunate as they were on many occasions in the conduct of the war, have been more unfortunate in the conduct of peace. The conference between M. Cle- menceau and Mr. Llovd George in London registers a real tragedy in their mutual rela- tions. A peace was reluctantly accepted by one "Mio iuret major Allies upon a founda- tion of which the theory was supplied by America and the practical working-out by Britain. The adhesion of America to a peace otherwise in many respects disappoint- ing and mistrusted by the French was ac- cepted as compensation for a hazardous ex- periment by a country whose idealism has withered in the bitter winds of cahimity. Now America, "baulking the end half-won, has in effect, almost, dissolved the partnership before the fulfilment of the obligations volun- tarily accepted, and, absorbed in partisan strike and domestic pre-oocupations, con- fronts the world with a spectacle of confu- sion and futility that is lamentable. In full faith that Mr. Wil&on was repre- sentative, the European Allies permitted American influences and theories to mould powerfully the terms of the peace and the organisation that was destined to consummate the work of the war by rendering its repeti- tion as difficult and dangerous as possible for a, deliberate conspirator against the wel- fare of the world. In Britain there was con- siderable real sympathy with the American idealism; but it was throughout understood without misgiving that the enormous weight and strength of American co-operation would be thrown into the scales in a permanent partnership designed to render effective a new and untried system conceived in full accord with the genius of "both races. In France, a treaty largely American was ac- cepted upon a similar understanding that American power would be pledged to .tand between a sorely-stricken nation and a new -war of revenge from Trans-Rhine. Britain now finds herself without a partner and France without an ally. By desire of the French, the general sys- tem of the League of Nations was reduced to it concrete formula to meet the danger that France apprehended, by the stipulations of the Anglo-American Alliance that was pledged explicitly, apart from the vague,' uncertain, and mistrusted provisions of the League, to come to the succour of France against aggression. To-day France and England find themselves devoid of the co- operation of America in winding up the war, in goiaranteeing the future, and, in the economic sphere, without the assistance that is indispensable if much of Central Europe is to be saved from foundering, and the lesser Continental Allies preserved from a catastrophe nearly as imminent, of which the prelude is heard already in a rate of exchange that is ominously dropping. To Britain is, moreover, an aspect of the American defection that is peculiarly ours. Never before had there been so great a craving to enter into a closer partnership with the great kindred nation across the At- lantic. The conviction prevailed that upon the moral community of ideals and the enor- mpus power and resources of the British Empire and the American Commonwealth it would be possible, and upon no other basis, to provide for .the future regulation of the world in peace and progress. Others, it was felt, were too weak and too unconvinced to co-operate effectively, or even to desire to co-operate; and indeed beyond these two States the conception of politics appears to us to be either Chauvinist or Bolshevist. Neither Lenip nor the unrestrained passion of a D'Annunzio, prototypes of the two most potent of contemporary forces, offers much real hope to a-eh&fcfcered JEuxope save the per- petuation, possibly in a more savage aspect, of ancient feuds, the settlement of old, and the birth of new occasions of strife. To Britain there is, therefore, a special mortifi- cation in the abstention of America. It is not sought to misinterpret the mo- tives that have left America still technically in a state of war, and in a mental confusion and indecision for which it is hard to name a parallel. Republicans have given assur- fcnces that in a similar emergency America will fly, and with no hesitation this second tune, to the relief of the wronged; and ;ay Stress upon the naturalness of a collision be- tween the two doctrines, to some degree in- evitably opposed, of self-determination and an Idealised in terna tionaIism which the Treaty and the Covenant of the League of Nations rest upon. Nevertheless, such assur- ances cannot dispel the disastrous effect of a refusal to endorse a settlement that will have the definiteness and force or a written under- taking. A future Germany with American action nominally uncontrolled by any specific pledges or undertakings might well be tempted to try anew, and with more dex- terity, a policy so nearly crowned with tri- umph before there had boen a glimmering of the idea in America of the tremendousness of the issues involved. And in material matters, apart totally from considerations that can become opera- tive only in the future, Britain recognises the extreme difficulty of the restoration of Europe to solvency from her own enfeebled resources, the impossibility of such a task for her impoverished Allies, and the essential need of a scheme of American support con- ceived upon the broadest lines to enable the Continent to procure credit, raw material and food, over a period of years, in which in- dustry can recommence, and the broken threads of international life pieced tos pethfcrx j again. r JSEi the immediate present there is the Th!?? <- ciosurmg the lingering discussion! f;tweeti Versailles and Berlin, marked V a ? creation ofdifH^S ^y °n^ion6 a"d the Partly, fhf? ?? :?? ?? r??? ?Germans.  thIs provocative and obsti™ctlonis" spirit on the part ????o?tioni. ment may be ribed to the ne<:essity under! which it feels itself, ?nd? thfe fires of the Monarchists and ? b?e\r ?? een "?T' Socialists, and with no?y?S? ?? ??. convinced ?nd energetic suppSo??  t' i --e show of resistance, a display of inde. Pendens, an endeavour to Jure some ?:J rumour? of  'circles disbelieve ?e rumaurs of -ft armies and surrept?Mu? arm? amen?s. There are loosely organised end lI1derIninate bodies ortensibly for the prese:vatlon of order, whœe neceMity to e certain ex??t -?h ? ?? L ? recognised, but it i? not to be aredit,d that the Allied intelligence ?? rvices that w co?P?ent enough during tVip war in  w? -In Penetrating the secrecy of'»« (Term?? piens are ?? mcap?ble of «uo^ rthait ^arre e^ Z he country lies open, thef? that are still maintained. However th, salient feature of the moment i» that th Anie?' COIlfe^y.atlon has insensibly dissolve imo ? dual alhar.ee for the purpQse im £ radiate s?hTt?kk!mng ? bac?k ?"- America bold t??.4 h sh^ g back ?to her former isola "fir Italy has serious internal problems •> own, the securing of control over L ^nnun/io. who has so fnr sideeessfullv de fied the Italian Government, and ispre occumed with the Adriatic. France f'nr1 Britain have to bear the brunt of dealing with the great and urgent cares that ari-e to beset tera.1 Allied cause, and it m,, be said indeed, with the demobilisation r' the British Colonial forces, that Gre-V Britain and France have to shoulder thr burden that was a fev months ago distn buted over America. Italy, the British fV pire, Japan, Belgium, Rumania, and Serbi- Franco-Brit'eh intimacy, disturbed it- far itS certain circles in Paris at least w concerned, by the adjustment of the Syn" problem, is'int?nsined. The two conntr t':e a hedouded and uncertain future, which their most solid comfort is trust each other's loyalty. Of, the two statesm who personify the States in council, the 1' H M*. Llojpvi George is markedly tha harder.

I RAILWAYS FUTURE. ! - -I

CANAL TRAGEDY.I

"KTLWAY FATATTTY AT BRITONI…

II THE POST BAG. ! I I

I TRUSTEES PLIGHT. I

I SAFES -CARRIED AWAY. j

i RAZOR BY HIS SIDE. I

CHAMBER OF COMMERCE. I

EAST SIDE -MILK CASE.I

ST. JUDE'S CHURCH, SWANSEA,…

IHELD-UP HOUSES. I

HELPING THE WIDOWS AND ORPHANS.

.LOAL N.U.R. MEN. I

EX-SERVICE MEN.

RAILWAY STRTKT! RUMOURS I…

[No title]

WEST WALES PITS.

AFTER 35 YEARS.

SWANSEA BUFFS.I

I .PORT TALBOT EISTEDDFOD…

ITHREE DEATHS. ——o———

go=--THE "WILD" WEST. -10-

WIFE AND CHILD. .———........

[No title]

DUNVANT WOMAN'S DEATH,

! CAPT. -PERCY HAY'S WEDDING.

EJECTMENT APPLICATION AT SWANSEA

I MUZZLES OFF ON THURSDAY.

REV. E. JONES AND SWANSEA…

[No title]