Cuddio Rhestr Erthyglau

22 erthygl ar y dudalen hon

- - - _ -ENEMY REPULSED WITHj…

PUSHING ENEMY BACK. I

OFFICIAL COMMUNIQUES. j -…

I CHASEO TO HELIGOLAND. I

KING AWARDS V.C. TO LIEUT.…

WHY MENIN WAS NOT OCCUPIED.

THE CHILIAN ACTION. I

AUSTRIAN SAILORS DEFEATED.I

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INTERESTING LETTER FROM THE…

jSWANSEA WAR PRIZES.

| PONTARDULAIS HERO'S WELCOME.

jPONTARDULAIS BOY SHOT.

MR. MASTERMAN'S REPLY.…

! COUNCIL7S DILEMMA. I !-I

WAR CAUSES FAILURE. I

- _- I NEATH WORKERS HELP…

WALES AND THE WAR

Newyddion
Dyfynnu
Rhannu

WALES AND THE WAR MRS, LLOYD GEORGE ON THt COUNTRY'S RECORD. Writing on "Wales and the War in the "Daily Chronicle" to-day, MTP. tloyd-GeorgF, sa.ys.—If one may judge from the steady si ream of shirts, socks, mufflers, and mit- tens which is tJowiug: into Downing-street, the women of Wales are as eager to make a. record for themselves as the men folk havo thready done. For. although it would bo difficult to tell the total number of Welsh- men now serving in the Army or the Navy, we do have the figures for recruiting since the beginning of the war, and tiiese show, i a.m proud to bay, that, in proportion to her population, Wales has at last beaten Scotland as" the best recruiting country of the United Kingdom. In the fit two mc-utlis of the war she sent 40,000 men into the Army. That 111 itfceJi is :1, whole corps, but, towards the end of September, a small provi«ioiia,l commit- tee summoned to Cardiff the wonderful biisiiieee conference of peers and working men, soldiers, and civilians. Churchmen and 1\ olloonformi"t6, who came to the conclusion that, \,Ta.Jœ ought to start afresh and raise .1 new army corps of her own. It was m this way thai our National Executive IR- cvniting Committee came into being, and ? should think that such &. oommitt-ee waA something unique in the way Of com- mittees. Its purpose was nothing short of carrying through for the Welsh counties the arrange^ -inont-s for mismfr. organising, feeding, and clothing their country'* little army, tire expeme being 1,)ort,e. by the War Office, to whom, when oomp'.ete^l, the corps WIlE to he handed over for higher training. Their aim was t4 rai&e three Army divi- sions, made up of 12 battalioue of in- fantry, two field end one sipnail company of Royal Engineers, three field ambulejices of the Royal Army Sledioai Oorpe. and one divisional train, and one reserve park of the Army Service Corps. According as they came from North Ws.les, Mid-Wales, or Sr u-th Wales, the new infan'tj-y recruits baTO where po«6dbl>e. heeT! formd. into freeh bat- talions of the Royal Weieh Fusiliers, the Welsh Regiment, or the Soruti WaJes oBr- derers, namee of which most have done much to attract their latest xnemhfrs. Of the three, the youngest ie She Welsh Regiment of Mid-Wal«=. which is now dose upon, two cen- turies old. It h.6 taken part in the fiMt Afghan War. and it foughrt at Alma. Inker- man. e.nd through The siege, of Sebastopol. Both the South Wales Borderers and the Royal Welsh Fusiliers were raised in March. 168?. ami both of them, curiously, won fame in Flsuider* aA the very beginning of their history. The Borderers served Kibrough the fit siege of Xa.mur in 1695. a.nd from then down to the splendid heroism of Borke'n Drift it bae brought greater and greater re- nown to W alee. I need say nothing of the Royal Welsh Pusiliens, famous all over the world, beyond recalling the faot that their first fighting was aleo in Flander* and that, besides Samur. Lille and Douai are places in the present war where the Fusiliers long ago won renown. With such a tradition behind them, to say nothing of the part which the sons of Wales have already played in this war. it is not surprising that. in leag than threa months, the new Army Corps should bo rapidly approaching its full war strength. The men are now in training at Llandudno. Colwyn Bay. and Bhyl, and. upon the whole, they are comfortable in their Quar- ters. But I hear that many of them are in sore need of tbe little things which make such a big difference to soldiers in training. A few days ago I appealed in the news- pa-p&r for comforte to send to them and. a" I have said, there has been a very ready response, chiefly in the shape of shirt*, so-ks, mufflers, and mittens. We should like more and more of these, and tobacco and pipes as well. I say "we" because, in the meantime, the women of Wales wh, can do most good in the matter ba, formed ourselves into a central commit,t-o to organise the distribution of comfort* the Welsh troops.

SEASONABLE GIFT.

SWANSEA MEMBER AND RED CROSS

- -.- _- - - -DEATH OF A SWANSEA…

THE TINPLATE EMBARGO.