Cuddio Rhestr Erthyglau

18 erthygl ar y dudalen hon

» - OUR LONDON LETTER. I

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» OUR LONDON LETTER. I [Prom Our Special Corrupondtni.] I I Even in the quietest suburbs there have been exciting things happening these last few days. The Territorials have been marching through the streets to the depots, with bands playing. Women have stood at their doors to see the men swing by, their brothers, cousins, sons, sweethearts^ "It's the band," the women say to one another, to explain and excuse the tears and the lumps in their thuoat-s. "I was a.ll right until the band begua to play." Certainly the music has a w'ondcrfnl elfoot, upon the men themselves as welt ae upon the ob- servers. They swing along in splendid fcwaioc, very &mart, very wcrkmanlike, verv eager, patriots every one of them. Thov have made eacrifk>es, these fine young fellows, and though every one has responded J che-erfully to the country's call, they would j be less than human if in the hearts of aome J of them there were not anxious thoughts i now and then aa to what will happen when their time of service is over. Will they be able to go back to their employment? Well, it is good to know that the employers, many of them, at leant, have set all anxiety on that point at rest. Many firms have not only promised to keep the posts open for the men, so that they can take them up when quieter times come again, but iiave also promised to pay them a proportion of I their wages while they are doing the country's feervi ce. It was quiet enough on Sunday morning in the suburb where I live. Bella were ringing, and people were going to church and chapel. It was for all the world like any other Sunday morning. Only down, by the station the paper-sellers were busier than usual, and a few more shops were open, displaying outside the placards aamotraoing the latest war news. And even people on their way to ehurch stopped and bought papers. The 'buses and tramcars were rather more crowded than usual at this hour. People were going up to the centre of things, to walk up and down Whitehall, to cheer outside the King's p 1. Among the passengers on the 'bus were three young Territorials* -with rifles, haversacks, and full war kit. At intervals we met or passed more Territorials, singly or in companies. Some were encamped in the parks, and men were hard at work un- loading vans of stores. A police station on the route had its queue of "aliens of German nationality" waiting to register according to the terms of the proclamation. There were hundreds of them, and for days the work of registration has been going on at every poliee station in London. People who paEt",{'d looked at them with curiosity. eome talked together with serious faces, and some were silent. All seemed anxious to get the ordeal of registration over and to get away. There were crowds in Whitehall and about Parliament-square, as there have been now for many days. Outside St. Margaret's Church there were hundreds waiting. The Abbey doors were closed. The great building was full, had been so for an hour or more. Many of those waiting outside St. Mar- garet's Church were Americans, and one tiny boy, who shouted with glee when a numbeT of horses wanted for military ser- vice parsed towards Victoria-street, had a tiny American flag fluttering in his cap. Downing-street was quiet enough. There were, perhaps, half-a-dozen people walking about in a leisurely fashion, and a motor- car was waiting outside the Prime Minis- ter's house. At the War Office there was a good deal of animation. Cars were drawn lip at the kerb, and there was a stream of people passing in and out. Four or five boy scouts, with ribbons flying from their shoulders, marched boldly up the steps, and were moved on to another entrance by the policeman on duty. The people waited about hoping to see Lord Kitchener. Only a very few of them seemed to recognise Lord Hal- dane when he came out of the War Office and crossed the road to the Horse Guards. The Lord Chancellor looked cheerful and walked jauntily, as though things were going well. The crowd was thickest about Bucking- ham Palace. Mounted police were riding slowly backwards and forwards, and there were motor-cars and carriages in the court- yard. A tremendous burst of cheering broke out as a carriage and pair passed slowly along through the crowd. Hats were waved and people pressed forward to see. In the carriage, leaning forward to respond to the people's enthusiastic greeting, was Queen Alexandra. Her Majesty looked very serious, but her manner had all the wonderful charm and graciousness which long ago en- deared her to the public. Before this the crowd gathered in the vicinity of the palace had witnessed a stir- ring spectacle. The Grenadier Guards marched out of their barracks at the end of Birdcage-walk. The King and Queen and several members of the Royal family had assembled in the forecourt of the palace to sea the men march by, and then his Majesty came out into the roadway and stood there to take the salute as his soldiers paseect. And the band was playing the "Marscillaise," and playing it magnifi- cently. My word, how the people did cheer. Just afterwards I met a Frenchman walk- ing along the Mall. He was stout and elderly, his fighting days long past, but he walked erect with a martial stride, his eyes gleamed, and he smiled. After all, it must be a fine thing to hear one's own National Anthem played under such circumstances and tremendously cheered by the people of another country. I can well believe that it was a great occasion for that Frenchman, 60 it was for the rest of us. It is in Whitehall, however, where the in- dications are most significant of the spirit which has taken possession of the people of London, as it has also of the people throughout the land. It is the spirit of ser- vice. There is no longer any party or fac- tion. Everybody is anxious to do something for the country. The central recruiting station, Great Scotland Yard, is under siege. Young men by the thousand are re- sponding to Lord Kitchener's appeal for re- recruits. They are of all classes, and their eagerness and enthusiasm are inspiring. r. another place there is a yard full of motor- cycles and motor-cars, and every few minutes a motor-cyclist comes dashing out and away up Whitehall, carrying de- spatches perhaps, or it may be only hand- bilfe for display in shop windows, calling for further service. Special constables are being enrolled, and those who cannot join the Army may in this way do the State some service. A splendid respon" is being made to the Prince of Wales's appeal on behalf of the National Relief Fund. Those who feel themselves unable to serve in other ways may send their contributions, however small, to his Royal Highness at Buckingham Palace. A. E. M. I

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MANY GERMANS ARRESTED. I

CANADA'S SPLENDID GIFT. I

FRANCE AND AUSTRIA. I

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PARLIAMENT ADJOURNED.:

ICAPTAIN'S SUICIDE.

I -HIGHLAND RAILWAY ACCIDENT.I

IOPENING OF TATTERSHALL CASTLE.…

I - PRINCE ARTHUR'S HEIR.…

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I MOTHER AND HOME. I

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TEA TABLE TALK.

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