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32 erthygl ar y dudalen hon

.600 YARDS OF ENEMY TRENCHES…

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600 YARDS OF ENEMY TRENCHES CAPTURED. .— —- SIR D. HAIG'S REPORTS. The following reports from Sir Douglas Haig have been issued by the Press Bureau: Sunday, 11.14 a.m. Early this morning the troops holding our line east of Villeret (south-east of Hargi- court) attacked and succeeded in entering the German trenches on a front of several hundred yards. A. number of prisoners have been taken by us. We successfully raided the enemy's trenches during the night in the neighbour- hood of Gavielle and east of Vermelles, and secured a few prisoners. Hostile artillery was active during the night in the neighbourhood of Westhoek. We captured thirteen prisoners as the result of local fighting north-east of Ypres. Sunday, 10.8 p.m. In the successful local operation carried out by us this morning south-east of Hargi- court, Northumberland troops attacked and captured 600 yards of German trench south of the positions gained by us in this area on August 26. We also captured fifty-two prisoners and two trench mortars. At the same time our troops attacked a small portion of hostile trench required to round off our line east of Malakoff Farm, and captured it after heavy fighting, in which considerable casualties were inflicted on the enemy. During the night hostile raiding parties attacked two of our pests south of Holle- beke. After sharp fighting, in which they suffered several casualties, the raiders suc- ceeded in entering one post, from which three of our men are missing. ITie attack on the second post was driven off with loss to the enemy. Early this morning the enemy also attacked our trenches in Inverness Copse, and were repulsed, leaving twelve prisoners in our hands. We improved our position slightly during the night north-east of St. Julien. ENEMY RAIDS REPULSED. Monday, 10.35 a.m. During the night the positions captured by us yesterday south-east of Hargicourt were successfully consolidated, in spite oi some bomb fighting on our new front. An enemy raiding party was driven oft last night east of Loos. ther raiding parties three times attacked our posts east of Armentieres, but were suc- cessfully beaten off in every case. We took a few prisoners in the course of the night in patrol encounters north-east of Monchy-le-Preux and north of Langemarck. MINOR OPERATIONS. Monday, 9.17 p.m. In addition to those reported this morn- ing, a few prisoners were taken by us during the night in the course of patrol encounters in the neighbourhood of Lagnicourt. Last tight local fighting, in which we cap- tured several prisoners, took place soiftn- east of St. Julien. South-east of St. Janshoek the enemy raided one of our advanced ppsts, from which a few of our men are missing. The post has since been re-established by us. Artillery has been active on both sides during the day east of Ypres. On the 9th inst. thick mist greatly hin- dered aerial operations. Artillery oo-opera- tion was carried out when possible, and a few bombs were dropped by day and night on hostile aerodromes. Three enemy machines were brought down, and four driven down out of control. Five of our machines are missing. ALL IN THE DAY'S WORK. I On Monday night the Press Bureau also issued the following dispatch:— As it is not po6sible to include in the daily communiques the almost numberless inci- dents occurring daily and nightly along our Front, often entailing hard fighting by small parties, and demanding high qualities of courage and endurance on the part of the troops concerned, a short summary is given below showing the general nature of the work which is constantly being done. Our patrols are continually at work both on the battle front and also upon what are generally regarded as quiet parts of the line. Small parties go out by day and night to investigate the enemy's wire, to ascertain the condition cf his trenches and the strength of their garrison, or the position of German machine-gun emplacements and strong points. Much valuable information is obtained, and encounters with the enemy's Satrols and working parties are frequent. Often considerable casualties are inflicted on the enemy, and prisoners are secured. A few instances will serve as examples of many. Recently a small party of troops belong- ing to a Scottish division lay up one even- ing on each side of a track in the neighbour- hood of the Bapaume-Cambrai road, and, after two hours of waiting, successfully am- bushed two parties of the enemy. Several Germans were killed or wounded, and one was taken prisoner. We had no casualties. On the afternoon of August 24 a New Zealand N.C.O. swam a river and spent five and a half hours reconnoitring the ground on the German side of the stream. In the evening he found a raft, on which he re- turned. Two hours later he took a patrol of three men across the river on the raft, surprised a small German post, and, after killing its occupants, brought his patrol back safely to the British lines. In the course of the fighting for the knoll east of Epehy, at the end of last month, a email partv of North-country troops, with- out loss to themselves, rushed a. German post south-east of the knoll, bombed the adjoin- ing dug-out, and destroyed the enemy's de- fences. In the same sector a patrol of dismounted Indian cavalry holding a small wood was at- tacked by an enemy raiding party and forced to withdraw. A counter-aiittack was at once made, and, at the cost of four casualties, the wood was cleared of the enemy. On another occasion British patrols en- countered a large enemy party working on the German wire in the Havrincourt sector. Our men opened ire with rifles and Lewis guns with such effect that the German party left half their number as casualties in their own wire. The greatest vigilance is demanded also of the troops holdiiS; our own forward posts. At the end of August a small German patrol endeavoured to rush a post held by North Country troops north of the Scarpe. One of the hostile patrol was taken prisoner and the remainder were shot. About the same date two parties of the enemy were obeeryod approaching the :pœte held by English county troops east of Wyt- echaete. Fire was opened upon them with Lewis guns at short range, and the parties were dispersed, leaving twelve of their num- ber dead in front of our outpost line.

TRAVELLING IN JAPAN. I

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0-BREACH BETWEEN KERENSKY…

SMALL SHOPKEEPERS DEFENDED.…

DEFRAUDED WIDOW OF £ 11,300.

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STORIES OF HEROISM AND SELF-SACRIFICE.

SIR E. CARSON ON PEACE.

RELICS OF ZEPPELIN RAID.

NEIGHBOURS' TRAGIC DEATHS.

REBEL LEADER'S BROTHER.

NEW ADMIRALTY SECRETARY.

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ITROUBLE AT AEROPLANE WORKS.__I

!DESCENDANT OF NELSON.I

£ 50 PETROL FINE.I

TOBACCONISTS WARNED. I

ISTARVED TO DEATH.I

IBLAZE AT MUNIIION WORKS.I

I DISCHARGED MAN'S SAD END.…

SILVER BADGE FOR SEAMEN. I

DRUNK AT SEA.I

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IN THE POULTRY YARD.

I SIGNALS FOR RESTAURANTS.

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IPRISONFORGERMANV IPRISON…

I AIR RECRUITS WANTED.

IWORRIED BY AIR RAIDS.!