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23 erthygl ar y dudalen hon

..-..--d__--CiJR LONDON LETTER.…

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d_ CiJR LONDON LETTER. I i, ( i? [From. Spcial Gorr,dent.] I i Mr. Balfqur Ilh-as Felclom been in better form than in-fhis p(iloech at the Mansion House celebration of the anniversary of America's entry into the war. To him was entrusted the toast of "The Day We Cele- brate," and it couid not have been in better Zecretar y since his hands. The Foroign Secretary, since his visit to the United States last year, has been with Americans cue of the most popular of the Allied statesmen, and the warmth of hia references to President Wilson and the great ideals for which he and the American nation stand, must tend to strengthen the bonds between ourselves and the United States. Particularly well-phrased was Mr. Balfour's reference to the decision of the American Government to allow their troops to be brigaded with the British and French. He saw striking proof of devotion to the I common cause and clear insight into the magnitude of the military struggle in the feahsation by our American Allies that in this way their soldiers could do better ser- vice than by waiting to fight in the first in- stance in an American Army. To measure what the American decision meant, said Mr. Balfour, let them ask whether a British Government would, without hesitation or Condition, consent to brig-aa!e British troops with troops under another flag. "I believe We should do it," he said. "I hope we should not fall below our brothers across the Atlantic in the higher patriotism. But it should be understood and realised by the prhole public in this country." The most striking passage in the after- noon's oratory was this, in the speech of the American Ambassador, Dr. Page: "In this hour of supreme test we are hurrying, and we will come with as many millions as are needed-.some, along with you and our French companions-in-arms, so to redden the fields of France that rulers or nations who hereafter meditate conquest will see there the price that free men paid for freedom, and will hesitate and desiol." "As many millions as are needed "-no wonder the Ger- xians are trying to force a decision before America can put forth her full strength. The Curfew Order has made a great dif- ference in the night life of London. "Lights out in restaurants by ten o'clock, and in theatres half an hour later, has upset the habits of quite a lot of people. Their num- ber is not so large as it would have been if such an Order had been issued in the days before the war.. People have been living simpler lives during the past year or two PrQ,m one motivo or another. There are many people who prefer to stay in their own houses o' nights instead of seeking amusement as in days of yore in West-End theatres and restaurants. But in spite of Wal" conditions there has been little notice- able lack of patrons either of the table or the stage, and even in these times of darkened streets the West End has "carried <m" till midnight and past. But that is ended now. After half-past ten theatreland is almost as quiet as the City. In order to comply with the new Order some of the theatres are starting their evening perform- ances earlier, but others, fearing that their patrons may object to hurrying over dinner, are sticking to the old time, and by shortening the intervals between the acts, and other devices, are managing to get the curtain down before the curfew rings-well, IK), it doesn't ring, of course. Something will certainly have to be done to restrict railway travelling, and it does seem as though a system of permits is the only thing that will meet the case. Raising the fares has failed to reduce the number of passengers, and the effect of the rolling- stock shortage is that every carriage is crowded, and frequently the luggage van as well. Any further reduction in the number of trains would simply make things worse. People of leisure would be early at the stations, and those whose time is valuable would never get a seat at all, and often, not even a place in the train, though the book- ing-clerk would have taken their money without a qualm. Apparently there is no law to prevent a railway company from sell- ing a thousand tickets to, say, Brighton, though they have no intention of sending a train that will carry more than six hundred people. Two companies have decided to take action in the matter of the alien air-raid refugees who have found London* bad for their nerves, and have flown to the seaside or the country. They have announced that no more season tickets will be issued to cer- tain towns, and that there will be no re- newal for any less period than six months of tickets already issued. Well, this does net) eeem particularly drastic, at any rate with regard to the people who already have season-tickets and are crowding out of the trains season-ticket holders of long stand- ing. People who can afford to live so far out will not be frightened by a six-monthly season-ticket. It is not money that scares em. Neither is the pressure on railway accom- modation likely to be much relieved by the increased price of season-tickets generally, which is being talked about. Season-ticket rates, says "a prominent railway official," are far too low, and he compares the price with that of- single-journey tickets. He seems to think that when ordinary fares were increased by 50 per cent., season-ticket rates ought to have been put up too. But, of course, the cases are entirely different. The increase in ordinary fares was decided upon in order to reduce the amount of travelling for pleasure. True, it seems to have failed, but that was what was aimed at. Season-tickets are nearly all held by business people and by workers who have to make the same journey every day. What- ever happens they must continue to travel, and therefore to make them pay more will not .make more room in the trains. As for the season-ticket joy-riders, of whom there are a few. they will probably pay the in- creased fare quite cheerfully. Any proposal to put up the price of season-tickets will certainly meet with vigorous opposition. Some years ago the Sunday Musical Union gave concerts on Sundays. It will be good lleW9 to music-lovers who may be spending week-ends in London that after being sus- pended for some seasons the concerts have now been resumed. They are given by Sir Henry Wood's orchestra at the Queen's Hall, the afternoon's programme being re- peated in the evening. The first concerts of the series consisted entirely of familiar items, well-tried favourites. Miss Carmen Hill sang very charmingly, and, Mr. de Greef gave an admirable performance of the I Grieg Piano Concerto. A. E. M. j

ORDER OF THE NILE. I

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——..——-S C-H E M E OPERATING…

PREMIER'S CALL TO INDIA. I

THE PRICE OF VICTORY.I

! THACKERAY AND CHARTERHOUSE.…

DOCTOR'S DEVOTION TO DUTY.…

KILLED AT HER WORK. I

DON'T USE TAXICABS. I

AMERICA'S DETERMINATION. f

)91 NEW IRISH JUDGE.? 

REVIEW OF EXEMPTIONS. II

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HUMOUR OF THE WEEK.I IHUMOURWEEK.I

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I OTHER MEN'S MINDS.

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OUR CHILDREN'S CORNER

THE LONDON RIFLE BRIGADE.