Symud i'r prif gynnwys
Cuddio Rhestr Erthyglau

20 erthygl ar y dudalen hon

NOTES ON NEWS. I I

Newyddion
Dyfynnu
Rhannu

NOTES ON NEWS. I I Only a few months ago there seemed to be good reason to hone that this country would in another year or A GREAT two be made self-snp- ACHIEYEMENT. porting. It looked as though we were ou the tvav to growing enough food for our needs. That dream* however, is not u ee d s. I realisable at present, for the reason that food cannot be produced without labour, find the Army's need of men is so urgent that agriculture has to get along as best it can wiifi those that the Army leaves. From Mr. Prothero's speech to the House of Commons it appears that "we have reached the. limit under present conditions of ploughing up new land. Great things i he been accomplished, however, the arable area of the country having been increased by 2,142,000 acres. Wheat acreage alone has been increased by 752,000 acres,, and the total area under crops is the highest ever recorded in the history of the country.. That is a splendid achieverrentl,- upon which the Board of Agriculture and the farmers deserve to be "commenùed. The success of the move- ment has been far greater than most people anticipated, and if it falls short of the moat sanguin. hope's, it is yet suffi- cient, w.th* America's contribution of foodstuffs, to ensure us against any danger of serious scarcity. The wheat reserves of the country have Jeen made absolutely safe. rill4t is the BETTER BREAD AND MEAT. very gratifying state- nient of t r i the ment of Mr. Clynes, the new Food Controller. All fear of the failure of the bread supply has now been removed. Even if the war should last a considerable time longer, we are in a position tc re- lease a; greater supply of wheat from our reserve. More than that, th& Food Con- troller makes tho welcomo announcement that the quality of bread is to. be im- proved. The food position generally has greatly, improved in the last few months. Fears of scarcity and hardship have fortu- nately not been fulfilled and with every week our supplies of essentials have been getting better, while distribution has also improved considerably. Besides better bread we are now promised better meat. For some time 70 per cent. of the meat consumed has been imported. This was a wise provision in order to conserve and increase the home production. This policy has had excellent results, and the proper- tiorrs are now to be reversed, so that we shall get from 70 to 80 per cent, of home- fed meat. The one drawback, from the consumer's point of view, is that better jjuality will mean a higher price. A remarkably interesting description has been published of new type of aero- I THE SUPER- AEETOPLA-NE. plane or which it is said j that the Royal Air Force I will soon have swarms at the front. It is capable of carrying pilot and observer, machine-guns, and a great weight of bombs, and of rising to the great height of 20,000 feet in an extraordinarily short time. Hying at this height it will be above the average range of guns and Ger- man airmen. One gathers that it will bo psíble with this machine for our airmen to. carry out bombing raids with little more risk than they would encounter in a joy-ride. They will be able to drop their bombs and sail swiftly back for a fresh load. The new aeroplane is so fast that .raids which formerly took the whole of the day will now be carried out. in a couple of hours. The engines are said to be completely reiiabk?—not merely better or more iellable than aeroplane engines have been thitherto, but completely reliable —so that the risk of failure no longer exists. It was well known that vast improve- ments hdlte been recently mad o in aero- To FRIGHTEN THE ENEMY ? plane construction, but these claims are stupen- dous, and one hopes, if we have really got a machine which can do all these things, that the Germans may not be able to built a tvpo to equal it while the war lasts. Exactly why such an account of the machine should have been published is rather a mystery. Was it to encourage our own people or to frighten the enemy:' The "G ermans every now and then send out sensational accounts of something now in aerial terrprs, and there seems to be no particular reason why we shouM have taken a leaf out of their book. Why not -have carried oat a long-distance raid-say to Berlin—with the new machines, and then have told us about tliem? In art. interview with the Associates Press of America, Lord Robert Cecil made A WARNING TO GERMANY. an important statement with regard to the eco- nomic policy of the! nations after the war. Adopting President Wilson's tormula as to the "partnership of nations which must henceforth guarantee the world's peace," to which without a change of mind and "heart Germany cannot be ad- mitted,. tlfiy more- than to tho free eco- nomic intercourse which must inevitably spring out of the other partnerships of a real peace he went on to say that Ger- many was the only ohstacle to such an economic association of free nations. Her treatment of the peoples within her reach rules her out. Says Lord Robert Cecil: Before we can offer, her any participation in our resources the must release her vic- tims from the economic slavery that she has imposed upon them. While the war continues we must take as measures of war all the steps required to destroy the economic basis of her military effort. When peace is restored the place of Ger- many in the common^v calth of nations will e determined by the test established by President Wilscn" If she abandons her old wavs and .her restless and aggres- sive policy, if she ceases to uso economic policy as a preparation for further war, • we shall not lie slow to recognise the- change, but the sacrifices for which this war. has called are too great and too bitter « to permit of our neglecting the Presi-" dent's warning- that a complete change of mind and purpose in her Government are the necessary preliminaries to her admis- sion to participation in our economic partnership." This is a plain and unmis- takable intimation to Germany that the Allies will never acquiesce in the settle- ments" on the Eastern front, and that unless. she mends" her ways and gives guarantees for the future, the economic -weapon, tremendously powerful as it is, will be used against her.

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ENEMY FORCED TO RECROSS THEI…

I. NEW FOOD ORDER.I

r.THE TABLES -TURNED. I

I THE AIRMAN'S NERVES. f

IHOLIDAY RESORTS HIT.

iEDINBURGH CASTLE. Ii

ISUPERSTITIONS ABOUT GEMS.…

IBABY'S FOOTPRINTS.

MORDERERy BODIES.

BUTCHER'S HEAVY FINE.__I

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< BOMBS ON HEIDELBERG STATION…

INELSON AT ST. ViNCENT.-t…

.TOBACCONIST FINED £250.

EARL OF ANTRIM HEAD.II

SOLDIERS AND SOUP.I

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I OUR LONDON LETTER. II